NY Adventure Club Presents: New Year’s Eve Speakeasy @ Civic Club Mansion

Don your flapper dress or three-piece tux and ring in the New Year inside a century-old mansion usually closed to the public, until now.

Join New York Adventure Club as we step back in time for an intimate, prohibition-era celebration inside a private mansion — originally built in 1899 for the Civic Club (which was dedicated to reducing poverty and gambling in the neighborhood), the house is now owned and operated by the New York Estonian Educational Society, which acts as the main center of Estonian culture on the U.S. Eastern seaboard

Once you relay the secret password at the entrance, you will enter into a highbrow affair and be treated to:

 

  • A host of interactive antique decor and props such as antique radios, Edison cylinders, stereoscopes (with prohibition-themed slides), and original prohibition prescriptions
  • Opportunities to purchase food and drinks from the house’s full restaurant and bar
  • Parlor games from the time period, including billiards and foosball
  • A champagne toast at midnight, which Volstead Act agents would have tried break up had they caught wind of it
  • Your ticket to this unique gathering includes entry into the private gilded age mansion, interactive opportunities with tons of authentic antiques from nearly a century ago, parlor games, and a glass of champagne to ring in the New Year.

     

    Flapper dress / black tie optional.

    See you there!

     


     

    Disclaimer

    Must be 21 or older.

    ID will be checked at door.

    By attending a New York Adventure Club experience, you accept our terms of service.

    Categories: Hidden Spots, Food, Historic Sites, Social

    58 tickets available

    $30

    Sunday, Dec 31
    9:30 PM – 1 AM

    New York

    Estonian House

    243 East 34th Street

    New York, NY 10016

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Victorian Holiday Party

What better way to celebrate the holidays than in a beautiful Victorian home? Enjoy offerings of hot spiced wine, apple cider and cookies while singing along to some traditional Christmas carols! Starting at 5pm, there will be a special radio performance by the Fireside Mystery Theatre. Victorian regalia welcomed! Tickets are $10, $8 Members/Students.

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December 15th: Winter Myths
Join us for a journey into the underworld of holiday lore and celestial solstice diversions! Victoria Flexner of Edible History will unveil the pagan roots of today’s seasonal traditions, followed by an astrological forecast for 2018 with astrologer Alice Sparkly Kat. Grab a cup from the cauldron of mulled wine and join in an introductory lesson on cult card game Magic: The Gathering, or browse the richly illustrated 19th-century McLoughlin Brothers children’s tales on view from the BHS collection. It’s the antidote to the holiday party circuit you’ve been waiting for, though tacky holiday sweaters are encouraged!

To learn more about the McLoughlin Brothers publishing firm and their vibrant picture books, visit the exhibition Radiant with Color & Art: McLoughlin Brothers and the Business of Picture Books, 1858-1920, on view now at The Grolier Club.

The Evening’s Schedule

5:00 pm – 9:00 pm A Magical Gathering
Test your might and the strength of your sorcery with a game of Magic: The Gathering! Tutorials available from local expert Peter Rawlings at 5:30 & 7:45.
Beginning at 5:45 pm Winter’s Tales
 Dig in to the BHS Archives for wintery folklore and stories from our collection of McLoughlin Brothers picture books. Stories of Santa Claus and other folk heroes come to life in vivid illustrations on these pages!
6:15 pm – 7:00 pm Winter Solstice & The Old Religion
Why did people choose some of the harshest months of the year as the focal point of their community holiday observations? Victoria Flexner of Edible History unveils and revisits some of the ancient &  Pagan roots of today’s holiday traditions.
7:15 pm – 8:00 pm What’s Going On?: An Astrological Analysis of Our Contemporary Climate
Astrologer Alice Sparkly Kat will talk about what will happen astrologically in 2018 in order to frame the near future as a segment of longer cycles. The intention of the discussion is to lead to an understanding of astrology as a tool for looking at time in a socially conscious way.
8:15 pm – 8:45 pm Folks, It’s Cold Outside
Warm up the ancient way: with a sample of cozy and spicy mulled wine! Enjoy a warm drink before heading home.

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Live-In Theater has come up with another interactive, participatory theater experience that is a dramatization based on real past events, in this case, the 1915 apprehension of 45-year-old Mary Mallon, called “Typhoid Mary” by the news media of the time. Reportedly, Mallon infected 51 people with Typhoid Fever, three of them died.

Alas, the one future performance of The Trial Of Typhoid Mary (Dec. 10th) on the online calendar of the Live-In Theater website is presently sold out, and no performances are (so far) scheduled for 2018.  However, your hope of seeing it may not be entirely lost. A stage manager told me that they do this production in “a lot of high schools” as well as “for private groups”. It has been around for a few years, and they performed it at The New York Historical Society in 2016.

Live-In Theater’s promotional materials for the show, “The Trial of Typhoid Mary” say, “Come give Typhoid Mary the trial she never received”. Ticketholders assemble (in this case, in the downstairs room of a Lower East Side bar), and a costumed re-enactor in solemn black who declared himself the judge set the scene, and chose various members of the audience to act the parts of jurors, bailiffs, and, at the performance I attended, a courtroom sketch artist. Another costumed re-enactor handed out golf pencils and notepads, and doubled as a “barker”. Though from the Colonial era to the mid-19th century, it was not unheard of for courts to be informally convened in taverns, (at least in Staten Island) by the end of the 19th century to the early 20th century (the time of Mary Mallon’s arrest for being a public health hazard), court proceedings had acquired a lot more formality and government control, not to mention proper courthouses. However, treatment of suspects under the premises of “innocent until proven guilty” had not advanced as much as it has now. I think the majority of the twenty- and thirty- something audience were properly horrified that Mallon had been arrested without a warrant, and some who questioned the actress who played Mallon on the stand clearly disapproved of the fact that she had not been read her rights (enforcement of this became a 1960s innovation), and had previously been summarily imprisoned on North Brother Island. Motivated perhaps by the role-playing of certain of the re-enactors, the suffragette who claimed to have been Mallon’s previous employer, who stressed that Mallon did not willfully infect others, and the one who played Mallon, who claimed to have nursed the family who got typhoid back to health, doing the more onerous duties, including washing soiled bedsheets, unlike in real life, they returned a verdict of innocent, though Mallon’s understanding of sanitary practices was to clean away all visible dirt, and she didn’t seem too concerned about whether she washed her hands “after she had been to the privy” if they were “not dirty”. All participants in this exercise had entered a time when “The Germ Theory of Disease” was as hotly debated and widely doubted as the phenomena of Global Warming is now, and with pretty much the same class divide between adherents.…

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A mural depicting New York City in the 1800s may soon be lost to time. The 1954 canvas painting by Julien Binford, entitled “A Memory of 14th Street and 6th Avenue,” is a 110-foot-long piece that is currently housed in the lobby of a now closed, one-story bank building, which stands at the intersection of Chelsea, the West Village and the Meatpacking District. The site is slated to become condominiums and retail space at the hand of developer Gemini Rosemont, which purchased the property for $42.4 million earlier this year. The New York Times reports that the interior has already been stripped. 

Andrew Cronson, a junior from New York University, spotted the mural back in October and contacted several local preservationist groups once he saw demolition permits posted on the building. Save Chelsea responded to the call, and now, alongside City Councilman Corey Johnson, it’s urging the developer to preserve the mural or turn it over to someone who will. While Gemini Rosemont is open to doing so, the company has not committed to the cause. In the meantime, it has been considering the options and contacting galleries to determine their interest in acquiring the piece, and its actual value. So far, there have been no bites.


The lobby of the former HSBC bank building

However, real estate company, Jamestown, which owns the Chelsea Market, has shown interest in taking the mural. Google has also stated that it would like to help protect the painting, The Times reports. Because the bank building is still in the design phase, no date has been set for the demolition.

The mural, which is painted on canvas, depicts what 14th Street and 6th Avenue might have look during the late 1800s: women are depicted carrying parasols; there are horse-drawn carriages and commuters are seen running to an elevated train. Before it was gutted, the building (101 W. 14th St.), designed by Halsey, McCormack & Helmer and constructed in 1953, formerly housed a HSBC branch. Binford, however, painted the mural for what was then known as the Greenwich Savings Bank.

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Start Date : 12.12.2017
Historic Cooking Workshop: Sugar Plums and Wassail

December 12, 6:30 pm

Hands on candy making session with a toast to the holidays

Did you know that there are no plums in sugar plums?  This ancient sweet treat was a favorite of 19th-century New Yorkers.  Learn about their ancient and recent past in this hands-on session, package your treats up for gift giving and toast with some wassail to get the holiday spirit going!

$25 Adults:, $20 Members and Students with ID

At Mount Vernon Hotel Museum & Garden

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From Curbed:

New York Transit Museum’s vintage subway trains return for the holidays

You won’t want to miss this

As the holiday season approaches, the New York Transit Museum is once again collaborating with the MTA to offer subway rides on its vintage fleet of subway cars.

And this year, in honor of the one-year anniversary of the Second Avenue Subway opening, this year’s holiday trains will run along the F line between Second Avenue and Lexington Avenue/63rd Street and the Q line between Lexington Avenue / 63rd Street and 96th Street.

Beginning Sunday, November 26, riders can “ride back in time” on a special eight-car subway train from the 1930s that is decked out with ceiling fans, rattan seats, vintage roll signs, incandescent light bulbs, and original subway ads of the time period.

Holiday train rides will be around for just five Sundays, running on November 26, December 3, 10, 17, and 24. On the F line, trains depart at 10 a.m., 12 p.m., 2 p.m., and 4 p.m. while from the 96th Street subway station, trains will depart at 11 a.m., 1 p.m., 3 p.m., and 5 p.m. The best part is that it will only cost you the swipe of your MetroCard.

From The MTA:

Holiday Vintage Buses Take You Down Memory Lane

Take a bus ride down memory lane, or time travel to the past for the first time, this holiday season!

MTA New York City Transit will offer rides on its vintage bus fleet on the M42 route beginning Monday, December 4, to Friday, December 22. A variety of vintage buses will operate along the crosstown route between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. on weekdays, weather permitting.

The annual tradition of running vintage, historic buses continues, as coaches make stops from river to river along 42 Street in Manhattan. Whether you’ve been riding the buses since before they were historic, or this is your first time experiencing the holidays in the city, these vintage buses are fun for everyone.

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If time travel were possible, someone visiting New York City during late November through December 100 years ago would find familiar scenes: these 17 photos show how those living in New York City between 1900 and 1915 shopped and stocked up for the holiday season. Despite the pervasiveness of online shopping in modern times, New Yorkers still crowd sidewalks and public places, and do their share of in-person shopping before the holidays. Special, temporary “holiday markets” have become increasingly popular, despite the great improvements made to online shopping in recent years. While those photos from the previous century seem to show that commercialism wasn’t as rampant as it is today, the late 19th century saw the trappings we now associate with Christmas start to spread to all levels of society, although with less thoroughness than in our times. There were some cultural differences, though. Apparently, Christmas postcards were big.

 …

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A Bit of a Party, December 11
Celebrate Charles Dickens’s A Christmas Carol in a whole new way. A Bit of a Party is an understatement; this event combines immersive theater, free-for-all desserts, and a wild afterparty with live holiday music. Theater troupe No. 11 presents a choose-your-own-adventure live staging of Dickens’s classic; indulge before and after in the goodies and the tunes. South Oxford Space, 138 South Oxford Street, Fort Greene

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120th Egg Nog Party, December 14
We thought it was just cream, eggs, sugar, and rum, but, hey, what do we know. Chemists, apparently, know the secret to the lip-smacking-est eggnog, and they’re letting us nonscientists have a taste at their annual holiday party. The Chemists’ Club has been hosting this ode to the ’nog for more than a century now, so its secret recipe must be one for the record books (or at least a cookbook). New York Academy of Science, 250 Greenwich Street (between Vesey and Barclay Streets), Tribeca

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