from Bowery Boogie:

Posted on: October 26th, 2016 at 5:00 am by


Suit up for more nightlife on Doyers.

The photo above seems the likely inspiration behind the forthcoming nightclub of same on Doyers Street. Chinese Tuxedo was as advertised, a tuxedo shop across the street from the imposter. Note the Third Avenue El off to the side, casting shadows onto the corner of Doyers and the Bowery. (There’s a Chase bank branch there today.)

The return of the moniker is a bit more controversial. A defanged Chinese Tuxedo bar-restaurant is pegged for a nebulous November debut at 5 Doyers Street. And there is a teaser website.


You’ll recall that the Chinatown community is none too pleased with this newest nightlife entrant. And with good reason. Lack of trust. Buckingham and Lam tried to get one over the neighborhood in April 2015 by going directly to the State Liquor Authority for beer-wine without informing Community Board 3. This after the advisory body had already denied full liquor outright. (The strategy being that full OP could follow after getting the gateway license.) However, CB3 would ultimately approve the slimmed-down version of same; the binding stipulations reportedly call for no upgrade to liquor for 18 months.


It’s worth mentioning that there were also rumors back in January that ownership was looking to sell the business altogether. Gives you an idea of the potential stability.

Here’s another peek inside. Chinese Tuxedo opens next month.



Continue reading


On Monday, October 31, West Village craft cocktail lounge Analogue will travel back in time to the 1920s for the exclusive No Password, No Party.

From 8pm-12am on Halloween, Analogue will be transformed into a sultry speakeasy, complete with live jazz and vintage cocktails.

On the menu: Rum-spiked Punch Romaines (the last cocktail served to first class passengers on the famed Titanic before its tragic fate), Rob Roys, Hemingway Daiquiris, Old Fashioneds, French 75s, Rosemary Maple Rickeys, and Sazeracs. Dress like it’s the Roaring Twenties and email for the magic words, plus table reservations.

Michael Tulipan / Analogue

There is no cover charge, and all drinks are $15.


Continue reading


In conjunction with the Culinary Historians of New York

From the earliest days of American history, food has played an important political function, especially in election years. Food can draw people together and create a sense of national identity, as it did in the years following the American Revolution. Food can also reflect deep political divisions, as the torrid battles between political parties in the 1800s demonstrate. Moreover, the symbolically significant nature of food allowed for the political participation of people otherwise excluded from public culture–namely, women.  Just days before the presidential election, Montana State University Assistant Professor of History, Emily J. Arendt, will explore how food, from Federal Cakes to Jackson Jumbles, contributed to Early American political and women’s history. Includes a sampling of food from the era. Reservations required by calling the Museum at 212-838-6878.

$40 Adults, $25 Members, $22 Senior Members, $10 Students with ID


Continue reading

from pulsd:
Join LES’s Most Famous Bars & Essex Street Market For A Discussion, Along With Tastings
120 Essex Street |
6:30PM – 8:00PM

The Lower East Side has undergone so much change in the last decade, and is arguably the only neighborhood in Manhattan where Jewish fabric stores and mom-and-pop shops stand next to trendy boutiques, hair salons, and hotel bars. Join Essex Street Market and proprietors of the neighborhood’s most famous bars and clubs, such as Max Fish, Lucky Jack’s and Hair of the Dog, for a discussion of the changing retail landscape. The discussion starts at 7pm, but come early for the reception at 6:30pm with complimentary tastings and drinks.

Continue reading

Friday, October 21st:  1pm – 8pm
Saturday, October 22nd:  11am – 6pm


Bold both visually and politically, the Moschino brand was known as outragous, with more to say than just the clothes they had to sell. Founded in 1983 by Franco Moschino under the name Moschino Couture!, Moschino used their marketing campaigns to state political views against violence, racism, environmental issues, animal cruelty and drug issues, even digging sometimes at the fashion system. Our special shopable vintage exhibit called ‘Make Manhattan Moschino Again!’ featuring iconic Moschino designs celebrates and reflects the amazing creativity, eccentricity and style of our great city! Curated by James Veloria Studio. More details coming very soon!

at the Metropolitan Pavilion
125 West 18th Street (Between 6th & 7th Aves)
New York, NY 10011

Get Tickets Now To Save $5 off Admission!

Print out this VIP invitation and bring with you to save $5 off the regular admission price of $20 at the door. Or purchase tickets below for the discounted rate!




October Show Exhibitor list!

If you are interested in becoming a vendor at an upcoming Manhattan Vintage Clothing Show contact today. Cover photo by Zandy Mangold, Show Photos by Luc Kordas


Continue reading

from pulsd:

This Halloween, turn back the clocks with a Prohibition inspired theme of bootleggers, gangsters and flappers at exclusive hotspot, Mr. Jones. The fun starts at 9:00pm on Saturday October 29, 2016.

Grab your $19 Ticket (a $35 value) for a Halloween celebration that promises to ooze class and style. Your ticket includes admission, a 1 hour vodka cocktails open bar (9:00pm until 10:00pm) and live DJ spinning the night away.

Located in SoHo right next to the West Village, Mr. Jones is one of downtown’s most highly sought after lounges. With this ticket, you are guarantee entry and your first hour of drinks are on the house.

This is where you want to be for the spookiest night of the year…

Mr. Jones
246 Spring Street
(212) 842-4566

  • May purchase as many tickets as you like for personal use or for gifting.
  • Open Bar runs from 9:00pm to 10:00pm.
  • Expires on Saturday October 29, 2016.

Inspired by a well-traveled, well-heeled bon vivant, Mr. Jones, pays homage to the last classic New York City lounges of the 1930s, and caters to the city’s tastemakers at this high-end, timeless venue.

Both the cocktail and food menus are influence by Mr. Jones’ globetrotting escapades and feature flavors and ingredients from around the world. The perfect spot for a Prohibition Themed Halloween Party.

Ladies and gentlemen alike will get to start their evening off with a complimentary 1 hour vodka cocktails open bar. With expert mixologists and state-of-the-art sound and light equipment, this boutique venue is designed for festive drinking and dazzling fun.

Your $19 Ticket (a $35 Value) Includes:

  • Admission to A Prohibition Themed Halloween Party at Mr. Jones.
  • Complimentary 1 Hour Vodka Cocktails Open Bar from 9:00pm until 10:00pm.
  • Live DJ entertainment.

Mr. Jones’ Website | Halloween | Tickets


Continue reading

sat 11am-4pm: see the beauty behind the brownstones at the 38th annual self-guided bedford-stuyvesant house tour. $20 adv, $25 day of.

Continue reading

sat + sun various times: more than 275 nyc historic landmarks and private
residences open their doors for tours and talks for the 14th annual open
house new york weekend. free.

Besides this, several buildings which are part of National Parks property within the NY Metro area are open to the public for free as well. From the OHNY website:

“Open House New York is proud to partner with the National Park Service to present Celebrating a Centennial – National Park Service, a special 2016 OHNY Weekend celebration of the nation’s most treasured sites and to help kick-off a second century of preservation and stewardship.

Experiences include after-hours tours of Hamilton Grange National Memorial, the historic home of Alexander Hamilton, and the General Grant National Memorial, the final resting place of Ulysses S. Grant; NPS Ranger-led tours of the African Burial Ground National Monument, the hallowed ground where free and enslaved Africans were buried through the late 18th century, and the Stonewall National Monument, one of the National Park Service’s newest site.

Open House New York an the National Park Service are also presenting “Empty Ellis”, a special tour of Ellis Island that lands at sunrise before it opens the public. On Saturday, October 15, twenty lucky winners will have the opportunity to explore the Ellis Island National Museum of Immigration as the early morning sun bathes the Great Hall in a quiet stillness rarely experienced by the site’s four million visitors each year. Tickets to this tour are being raffled here. Entries will be accepted through 5pm on Tuesday, October 5. Winners will be randomly selected and announced that day.


Continue reading

October 19, 2016

City of Dreams: The 400-Year Epic History of Immigrant New York


With more than three million foreign-born residents today, this city has been America’s defining port of entry for nearly four centuries. These migrants have brought hundreds of languages and distinct cultures to the city, and from there to the entire country. Tyler Anbinder, author of The Five Points, discusses his new book, City of Dreams, which puts the immigrant experience at the center of the growth and development of New York City. Pulitzer Prize nominated author Suketu Mehta joins Anbinder in conversation.

Seating is first-come, first-served. Doors will open at 6 p.m. Books will be for sale with a 15% discount. If you have any questions, contact Laura Lee at or (646) 518-3032.

October 19, 2016
6:30-8:00 PM
Tenement Museum
103 Orchard Street, New York NY 10002



Continue reading

Schaffer’s Tavern: Historic Staten Island restaurant is closing

By Pamela Silvestri

on September 14, 2016 at 1:22 PM, updated September 15, 2016 at 11:00 AM

STATEN ISLAND, N.Y. — Rumors have been afloat for more than a year that Schaffer’s Tavern was sold. Well, turns out there’s truth behind the talk.

Pending regulatory and Buildings Department approvals, Victory State Bank is taking over a long-term lease of the historic space at 2055 Victory Blvd. in Meiers Corners.

Construction of a new building will begin in early 2017, according to Joe LiBassi, Victory’s founder and chairman. When that happens, proprietor Winky Schaffer and his family will retire from the restaurant business.

A final day of Schaffer’s Tavern service has not been announced.


Back in March, when rumors ran rampant of a bank taking over the spot, Schaffer shrugged off the chatter as he tended bar. He couldn’t complain about business and admitted it’s been a great stretch — 83 years in Meiers Corners — making the place the longest-running family-owned eatery on Staten Island.

Photos: A look at the enduring appeal of Staten Island's Schaffer's Tavern

Photos: A look at the enduring appeal of Staten Island’s Schaffer’s Tavern

Schaffer’s Tavern, the longest running family-owned restaurant in the borough, celebrates its 80th year

“Hello, my friend! How ya doin’?” said Winky back on that balmy spring day. He reached over to the side to shake hands with a patron, then took back to his spot behind the taps filling chilled mugs with beer.

There’s a lot of history within these knotted pine walls, many fond memories of families and neighborhood “good people” types, Schaffer has said.

And, the story of Schaffer’s goes like this: Winky’s grandfather, George, had a speakeasy, located at the top of Jewett Avenue at Victory Boulevard in the 1920s. (That’s where a Burger King is now.) When Prohibition ended, George opened Schaffer’s in its current building (2055 Victory Boulevard) purchased in 1933. The structure resembles a Bavarian tavern with its flower boxes and roof line.

Winky manages the restaurant with sons Chad and Troy. Some of the family members live in two apartments upstairs.

On Tuesday, waitress Mary Karpeles shuttled to tables Schaffer’s famed pastrami and separate platter of tender, brown sauce-topped fresh sliced ham served with string beans and mashed potatoes. She’s been a server at the restaurant for over 30 years and knows customers by name.

Other long-time employees are held in high esteem like the Schaffers’ late bartenders — Ed Cicci, Ed Lunny, Peter Barquin, Charles “Cookie” Farley, Ed Noonen — who are memorialized in the front room.


Detail inside the two-room tavern include ceramic tile floors and auburn woodwork, both original to Schaffer’s. Only the bar has changed: Seventeen years ago, a fire damaged a mantle that hung over the space and subsequently a carpenter named Joe Tuite built a new back-bar.

Other traditions in the place include small jars or bowls of hot red peppers and vinegar-pickled green tomatoes, potato pancakes and sauteed red cabbage.…

Continue reading

Copyright © 2011-2016 Bygone NYC - All Rights Reserved