Month :

Sep ,2014

Mon 09 2014 , by

Wo Hop

Wo Hop (est. 1938): Looking for authentic Chinese food? Go anywhere else in Chinatown. Wo Hop is known for deliciously unauthentic, Americanized Chinese food. The walls of this basement restaurant are covered with photos of patrons, put there by patrons; add your own while you wait for your “Chinese” dish to come out.
15 Mott Street
New York, NY 10013
212.964.8365.…

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from Brooklyn Based e-newsletter:

“If you haven’t been watching The Knick, it’s well worth cozying up to someone with Cinemax (yes, they’ve got more than soft-core porn). As the initiated know, it’s an unsparingly gruesome portrait of Gilded Age New York, told through the framework of The Knickerbocker, a Victorian hulk of a hospital, which is struggling to modernize as its star surgeon, played by Clive Owen, battles the limitations of technology, and his raging drug addiction, to move medicine forward into the newly-hatched twentieth century.

The New York depicted on The Knick is both utterly recognizable to present-day inhabitants and also another place all together. And a lot of it is filmed in Brooklyn, from The Knick itself to the sets at the show’s Greenpoint studio. ”

Boys’ High School in Bed-Stuy is used for the exterior of the old hospital.

Howard Cummings: The heart of the story is the hospital, and the fact that the hospital had to be modernized and it was struggling. For me it was very important to choose an exterior that represented the Gilded Age, which was fading, going away in 1901. Manufacturing and the sense of uniformity was starting to become part of society, and I thought our hospital had to reflect that. The Boys’ High School is a really great example of kind of Romanesque, Victorian architecture. All the windows are all different and there lots of hand detailing and different carvings like terra cotta lions heads, which meant to me the interior could have things that were unique to itself, and a little bit chaotic, as opposed to a modern vision of hospitals, more uniform.”

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The Cotton Club had competition: it seems a number of similar establishments existed in a nearby geographical area at the same time. In many cases, physical evidence of these jazz clubs was obliterated as properties changed hands, and peoples’ behavior shifted. Find out more at http://www.bigapplejazz.com/historiclenoxave.htm

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Mon 09 2014 , by

Cafe Reggio

Cafe Reggio (est. 1927): If the assortment of dark Renaissance-era oil paintings, statues, and stained-glass windows aren’t enough of an indication that this tiny coffee shop is a classic, just ask consult local historians. Their claim: the cappuccino machine that still stands tall in Reggio, imported from Italy in 1902, was the first in America and essentially gave Americans their first taste of the beverage. At the time, the store was a barbershop that served clients 10-cent cups of coffee. It didn’t switch its focus to caffeinated beverages until 1927.…

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Mon 09 2014 , by

Marie’s Crisis Cafe

Located at 59 Grove Street, Marie’s Crisis is housed in an 1839 building. Its name is derived from Thomas Paine’s essay, The American Crisis, since Paine died on the site in 1809, and from Romany Marie, who was the proprietor of several tearooms in Greenwich Village at the turn of the century. Today, Marie’s Crisis is a piano bar where a showtune is never far away and a former haunt of Eugene O’Neill and Edward VIII. The ambiance is aided by a WPA mural, whose origins are unknown. The mural behind the bar depicts the French and American revolutions and another mural entitled La Convention depicts Robespeirre, Danton, and Paine.…

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Mon 09 2014 , by

Minetta Tavern

Minetta Tavern (est. 1930s): Since Keith McNally revived this place in 2009, it’s been selling burgers that cost $26, and that are worth every penny, according to food critics. But before that, it was an Italian restaurant that was a favorite of Beat poets and other unshaven pub crawlers in the Village. Most remnants of this time remain, and what’s been added only lends the tavern all the class and ambiance you’d want to accompany your $26 burger. This was also one of our own adds to Discovering Vintage New York‘s list.…

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Mac Conner started his illustration career in the Navy, and upon leaving the service, he had early success, with his work first appearing the cover of the Saturday Evening Post.

The Museum of the city of New York exhibition presents Conner’s hand-painted illustrations for advertising campaigns and women’s magazines like Redbook and McCall’s, made during the years after World War II when commercial artists helped to redefine American style and culture.

Co-sponsored by The Modern Graphic History Library at Washington University in St. Louis and the Rockwell Center for American Visual Studies.

Runs through January 19; Museum of the City of New York, 1220 Fifth Ave. (at 103rd St.); 212-534-1672 or mcny.org

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thru 10/5: bamcinématek presents ‘retro metro‘, a 16-film ride through the history of the new york city subway from the 1930s to the 1970s:Â the warriors, beat street, just another girl on the i.r.t., the taking of pelham one two three, saturday night fever, and more. $14 general, $10 students/seniors.…

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sat-sun: the nyc big flea debuts with 600 vendors selling vintage clothing, jewelry, furniture, art, collectibles, and more. pier 94 (12th ave @ 54th st.), $10 admission includes both days.…

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fri 12-8pm: the gentlemen’s vintage show + sale features mens’ clothing retailers selling rare denim, dapper suits, rock-a-billy wear, accessories, and more. 123 w. 18th st. (2nd floor), $15 admission.…

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