Month :

Sep ,2015

Murder & Mayhem Trolley Ride
GREENWOOD HEIGHTS
November 14, 1 PM
Green-Wood Cemetery

The Halloween spirit has been in full effect since Labor Day, but this tour will make sure it stays strong ’til it’s almost turkey day. A mid-November trolley ride through massive Green-Wood Cemetery will allow you to explore the most haunted spots as you visit the final resting places of victims that died from the Brooklyn Theater fire, the Malbone Street train crash, the Morro Castle Disaster, and more.

$20│Get Tickets

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Little-known fact: There’s a time machine in Times Square. Walk to the back of the Liberty Diner and a 1920s-style burlesque variety show awaits you. Presented by immersive New York theater company Speakeasy Dollhouse, Ziegfeld’s Midnight Frolic is bringing the glittering glamour of Paris to this unlikely space through October 17.

234 W. 42nd St. (at Eighth Ave.); 646-221-5239 or speakeasydollhouse.com

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from NYmag.com: How an 1890 Townhouse Was Brought Back From Near-Ruin

“Our first visits to our future Harlem house were conducted by flashlight because much of the building had been boarded up. It was impossible to work out what certain parts had once been like. Empty for eight years, it had previously been an SRO, a synagogue and school, and some kind of clinic. Tiny closets held unpleasant bathrooms, stuffed in after the fact. There was graffiti on the walls. The basement held two or three inches of water. The blocked drains had overflowed, ruining the ceilings. …

But it had been built as a grand family home, and behind the iron-spot Roman brick façade lay a stack of four oval rooms. Four! One would have been exciting enough. The house had kept nearly all its original fireplaces and a great deal of its paneling and plasterwork. It had been built in 1890 by the baking-soda magnate John Dwight, co-founder of Arm & Hammer. His initials were embossed in plaster on the dining-room ceiling.

Not long after we bought the house, members of the Dwight family got in touch to say they had photographs of the building from the 1920s, made when the family had left Harlem. Would we be interested?

Would we be interested! The album, together with the original blueprints, answered nearly all of our questions. Every room, except the bathrooms and the cellar, had been photographed. “It’s the Rosetta stone,” said our contractor, Mike Casey. Our architect Sam White (the great-grandson of Stanford White) said he had never worked with such a well-documented house.”

 …

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These pictures of the newly-restored Dyckman House museum were taken during a New York Adventure Club “after-hours” tour on Sunday, September 27, 2015. More and better pictures can be seen on the NYAC website/meetup group.

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Park Benches at the approach to Dyckman House. The docent said that Dyckman House is the only historic house museum within a city park.

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Parks Department sign at the top of the steep stairway to Dyckman House.

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Of course, one of the first things you may see as you approach the house is the modern restroom installed by the NYC Parks Dept in the foundation/crawl space area.

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The “winter kitchen” on the basement level of the house. This room was used as a kitchen in winter because the fire from the great hearth would heat up the house. On top of the mantelpiece; an old-fashioned flat iron; in the niche on the right, a long-handled pot meant for melting and pouring candle wax.

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Exhibit of Colonial-era kitchen utensils found in house/area in the “relic room”. The display case for the utensils atypically contains some present-day artworks by an up-and-coming area artist whose artwork is being shown in the public areas of the house.

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From The New York Times:

“On June 5, THE DYCKMAN FARMHOUSE MUSEUM, at Broadway and 204th Street, reopened after a six-month spruce-up. Dyckman’s descendants bequeathed it to New York City’s parks department 100 years ago. Admission is pay-what-you-wish.

Brick paths wind to a two-story Dutch Colonial farmhouse with a sloped roof, the property veiled by a riot of roses, lavender and wisteria vines. Under a canopy of century-old beech trees in the backyard is an excavated and rebuilt Hessian log hut typical of the 60 or so barracks that housed German mercenaries on the British payroll during the Revolutionary War.

The patriotic Dyckmans fled their home and cherry and apple orchards during the British occupation (1776-1783), only to find it all in ashes when they returned. The current structure dates to the 1784 rebuilding.

Procreating and prospering, the family helped found a library and a school. Little scandal has surfaced on the high-minded Dyckmans, although the family did own at least one slave. Around 1820, a nephew named James Frederick Smith moved in with his maternal grandfather and bachelor uncles. Said to be charming, the boy won them over and in a Dickensian twist changed his name to Isaac Michael Dyckman to inherit the estate. His portrait is among those on display, along with contemporary pieces by Ben-Christo, whose exhibition runs through August. Of Dutch ancestry and an Inwood resident, he weds the two by superimposing vivid images of people he has photographed near the house over transfigurations of museum artifacts, such as the parlor’s antique grandfather clock.

Further helping to unleash the museum from the past is an influx of visitors afflicted with “Mad Men” mania. The show’s snooty Pete “Dykeman” Campbell trumpeted his lineage, leading fans to soak up his aura in the nobly furnished parlor and bedrooms. The museum happily accepts the increased traffic and then debunks the connection.

Someone like Pete Campbell would probably not brag about being from the déclassé-sounding Tubby Hook — what Inwood was called until the mid-1800s. The new name took hold when the Hudson River Railroad opened a station and dignified merchants like the Lord family, of Lord & Taylor, and Isidor Straus, co-owner of Macy’s, kept country retreats there.

The station closed in the late 1800s and most of the wealthy residents sold off their resorts. Inwood went into decline. “The area was taken over by institutions, two for wayward girls and a tuberculosis asylum called the House of Rest for Consumptives, which I can’t imagine was popular with the locals,” said Cole Thompson, who founded the website My Inwood.

Mr. Thompson lives at Park Terrace, a co-op complex built on the site of the grandiose Seaman mansion, in the 19th century mockingly called Seaman’s Folly or Mount Olympus on the Hudson. On Broadway and 216th Street, shrouded behind an auto body shop, is a scale model of the Arc de Triomphe; it was once the entrance to the Seaman estate.

Take a look at it before or after a stop at DARLING COFFEE (4961 Broadway, 212-304-0181), featuring ceremonious pour-overs for coffee obsessives and masterful chocolate layer cake enrobing ganache and chocolate mousse.…

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From The New York Times:

“Someone like Pete Campbell would probably not brag about being from the déclassé-sounding Tubby Hook — what Inwood was called until the mid-1800s. The new name took hold when the Hudson River Railroad opened a station and dignified merchants like the Lord family, of Lord & Taylor, and Isidor Straus, co-owner of Macy’s, kept country retreats there.

The station closed in the late 1800s and most of the wealthy residents sold off their resorts. Inwood went into decline. “The area was taken over by institutions, two for wayward girls and a tuberculosis asylum called the House of Rest for Consumptives, which I can’t imagine was popular with the locals,” said Cole Thompson, who founded the website My Inwood.

Mr. Thompson lives at Park Terrace, a co-op complex built on the site of the grandiose Seaman mansion, in the 19th century mockingly called Seaman’s Folly or Mount Olympus on the Hudson. On Broadway and 216th Street, shrouded behind an auto body shop, is a scale model of the Arc de Triomphe; it was once the entrance to the Seaman estate. (From The New York Times, N.Y. / Region Two Reasons to Visit Inwood: Dyckman Farmhouse Museum and Darling Coffee )”

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H.P. Lovecraft Festival Kraine Theatre; 7:30pm; $20
Cthulhu, Shoggoths and the other trippy stars of the Lovecraft canon take center stage at this theatrical celebration of the beloved sci-fi visionary. Enjoy live adaptations of The Horror at Red Hook, Hypnos and The Curse of Yig as Kraine Theatre kicks off the 10-day festival.…

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The Roaring Twenties: A Jazz Age Party McKittrick Hotel; 6pm; $150–$500
Patrons of one of the city’s most iconic genres of music will get to party like it’s 1927 at this bash to launch Jazz at Lincoln Center’s 28th season. Take a spin among fizzy drinks, bouncing tassels and big band performers at this lively celebration.…

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