Month :

Sep ,2016

an urban walking guide

Michael B. Helmreich has walked through every neighborhood in Brooklyn, block by block, experiencing the people and places that gives King County its’ legendary appeal.  Join us as he chronicles his journey from Gravesend to Greenpoint lending his insight into the unique character, and characters of the borough.

Wednesday, November 30, 2016 7:00 pm – 8:00 pm
Central Library, Brooklyn Collection

Where

10 Grand Army Plaza
Brooklyn, NY 11238
718.230.2100
Fully accessible
Get directions from Google.

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lecture

Wednesday, September 28, 2016 7:00 pm – 8:00 pm
Central Library, Brooklyn Collection

Starting in the mid-1800s, immigrants brought their knowledge of pasta and pasta making to Brooklyn, making it the epicenter for macaroni’s widespread use in the U.S.A.  Leonard DeFrancisci discusses the people, companies, and technology that turned a simple recipe into a worldwide industry.

Age Group: Adults

There will be a wine and cheese reception, beginning at 6:30.  The program will begin promptly at 7:00

Where

Central Library

10 Grand Army Plaza
Brooklyn, NY 11238
718.230.2100
Fully accessible
Get directions from Google.

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Description

Adam Gopnik, staff writer for The New Yorker and author, will speak on the legacy of writer and preservationist Jane Jacobs (1916-2006), whose work changed the way the world views and understands cities.  Award-winning author and preservationist Roberta Brandes Gratz will introduce Gopnik.

Presented with the Center for the Living City.

free

Date and Time

Wed, September 28, 2016

6:30 PM – 8:30 PM

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Location

Museum at Eldridge Street

12 Eldridge Street

New York, NY

View Map

 …

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Friday, September 30, 6:30 p.m.
Open Mic Nite in the Garden
In the 19th century, literary salons gathered great thinkers, artists, and writers under one roof for a night of socialization and “improving conversation.” In that same spirit, the Merchant’s House celebrates the works of today’s new writers, performance artists, and musicians. Come to share your work or simply enjoy. Wine & light refreshments will be served.
If you’d like to perform, please bring no more than 5 minutes of material; sign-up available upon entry.
Admission $10, Students & Seniors $5, FREE for Members.
Upcoming Open Mic Nites: TBA

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-cut-and-paste-
“I am working on disability activism in NYC in the 1930s–including, of
course, the League of the Physically Handicapped.
I understand that in the late 1980s DIA interviewed members of the League,
including Florence Haskell and Sylvia Bassoff. Do you know how I might be
able to access those tapes?
Thanks!
Warren ”
www.WarrenShawHistorian.com…

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from The New York Times:

World-Class Photojournalism, at Home in the South Bronx

By JAMES ESTRIN

When Eugene Richards opens his next exhibit, it will not be at a Chelsea gallery or a major Midtown museum. It will be at a location that he much prefers: the Bronx Documentary Center.

It is a fitting location for an exhibition of images of poverty in America from the 1980s. If the show were in downtown Manhattan, he said, the audience “might not be that interested and see it as ‘urban archaeology’,” he said. But at the B.D.C., poverty is not an abstract concept, since it is in Melrose, a South Bronx neighborhood that has been among the country’s poorest urban communities.

“The audience in the Bronx will come in and have a different read to the pictures and many will have a closer relation to them,” Mr. Richards, 72, said.

His exhibit, “Below the Line: Living Poor in America by Eugene Richards,” (slides 1 – 4) on view Oct. 1st through Nov. 6th, marks the fifth anniversary of the B.D.C., an unlikely institution that combines exhibitions of famous and emerging photographers, film screenings, community-based educational programs and free photography workshops intended to create the next generation of documentarians from diverse racial, ethnic and economic backgrounds.

Mr. Richards may be one of the best-known photographers, but he is a fairly solitary figure who is not a member of a collective, or a photo agency. He tends to keep to himself and his family when he is not exhibiting his long-term projects or teaching workshops.

But the B.D.C., where he often speaks with students, is where he finds a much-needed sense of community that reflects the city’s diversity.

“It’s the total opposite of the usual photographic experience,” he said. “It’s like getting into a room full of friends. It’s important to me because it’s the only place I can go in New York that is diverse and where we’re all there to talk about photography and issues. It feels like a homecoming.”

The B.D.C. was born out of long conversations between two close friends, Michael Kamber and Tim Hetherington, both of whom were experienced conflict photographers. They yearned to create a space that would feature the kind of serious, long-term, issue-oriented photography that was anathema to galleries in SoHo and Chelsea, while also educating new visual storytellers.

Mr. Kamber saved money from his many years of covering the Iraq war for The New York Times and purchased a renovated 19th century landmark brick building on 151st Street and Courtlandt Avenue in the Bronx in 2010. Mr. Hetherington, who was also an Oscar-nominated filmmaker, was killed while photographing in Libya four months later.

Mr. Kamber was devastated, but continued to work on the B.D.C., maxing out five credit cards to buy supplies as he and a group of volunteers laid down floors, built walls and installed wiring. Danielle Jackson, who had been in charge of exhibitions at Magnum Photos in New York, helped found the B.D.C.

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Thursday, September 22, 2016, 6:30 p.m.

Program Locations:

Fully accessible to wheelchairs
First come, first served

 This illustrated lecture explores the transition of the district from industrial space to artists’ enclave to affluent residential area, focusing on the legacy of urban renewal in and around SoHo and the growth of artist-led redevelopment.

Events at The New York Public Library may be photographed or recorded. By attending these events, you consent to the use of your image and voice by the Library for all purposes.

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From “What To Catch At The New York Public Library This Fall

At The Schomburg Center…”When Sugar Hill Was Sweet (September 22), a look at some of the women of Upper Manhattan’s past who have been outshined by their famous husbands, including Shirley Graham DuBois and Eslanda Goode Robeson.”…

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Wednesday, September 28, 6:30 p.m.
Illustrated Lecture: Edith Wharton and the Food and Dining of Old New York
Descended from the city’s oldest Dutch and English families, Edith Wharton had intimate knowledge of the fading social customs of the early 19th century, Old New York, which she skillfully captured in numerous novels, stories, and her unforgettable characters. Her narrative details, of fashion, décor, etiquette – and food – are telling of the period and, more importantly, the social world of her characters. Using examples from Wharton’s fiction and non-fiction, combined with details of culinary history, food historian and professionally trained chef Carl Raymond will present a unique portrait of food and dining in 1840s to 1860s New York told through the lens of one of America’s greatest writers. Reception follows the lecture.
$25, Members $15. Click here for tickets.

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From “What To Catch At The New York Public Library This Fall“:

“For more information on New York City and its specific history, head to the Mid-Manhattan library for events on such wide-ranging New York topics as Soho’s gentrification (September 22), New York in the Gilded Age (November 7), Ground Zero and the Remaking of Lower Manhattan (November 8), and a celebration of subway buskers (November 14). To learn more about what makes New York City (and other cities around the world) so essential, the Stephen A. Schwarzman Building will host the lecture What Makes a Great City? on September 21. On November 2, the Schwarzman Building will also host The Well-Tempered City, a discussion on how cities can adapt to the problems of the future, including climate change, income inequality, and migration.”

 …

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