Month :

Apr ,2017

-Event Passed-

from CityLimits.org:

April 29 @ 11:00 am5:00 pm

South Street Seaport Museum celebrates its 50th Anniversary

The South Street Seaport Museum, situated in the original port that built New York into the city it is today, will celebrate fifty years this year! The Seaport Museum invites the city to join in the celebration of this important milestone, which will be recognized over an entire year (April 2017-April 2018) of special programming and exhibitions. …

April 2017 marks fifty years since the Museum received its charter from the New York State Department of Education Board of Regents. Over that fifty years the Museum has grown dramatically, collecting artifacts and works of art documenting the rise of New York as a port city.; developing and implementing innovative and award-winning programming; mounting exhibitions; and preserving a fleet of historic ships on the East River. Despite three massive setbacks: the 9/11 attacks, the Great Recession of 2008, and the floodwaters of hurricane Sandy, the museum is growing once again. With support from New York City and a dedicated group of staff, volunteers, members and friends, the Seaport Museum remains an educational and cultural gem in lower Manhattan.

The Seaport Museum’s 50th anniversary will be marked throughout the year with the opening of new exhibitions, including Millions: Migrants and Millionaires aboard the Great Liners, 1900-1914 (opening June 2017), artistic and musical performances, lectures and book talks, walking tours, and a formal 50th anniversary cocktail reception aboard the 1885 ship Wavertree in September.

Capt. Jonathan Boulware, Executive Director of the Museum, spoke enthusiastically about the anniversary. “It’s a great privilege to celebrate the five-decade life of this vital institution. We’re here in the original fabric of old New York, the ships, the piers, the 19th-century buildings. It’s the history of New York, but the topics we cover are still highly relevant today. The original values that made New York what it is, the Dutch values of trade and tolerance, the New York values of immigration, of multiculturalism, and of ambition, these all touch on urgent issues of New York and America today. Indeed, as we celebrate this important anniversary, we’re also celebrating the very best of New York values, past, present, and future.”

A brief history of the Seaport Museum:
The Museum proper is housed several buildings known collectively as Schermerhorn Row, but when completed in 1812, Schermerhorn Row was, in many respects, the city’s first world trade center. The Row housed a series of counting houses where merchants bought and sold coffee, tea, cotton, molasses, and countless other trade goods from around the world. South Street was nicknamed ‘the Street of Ships’ for the countless sailing ships that docked there, linking the city with some of the most important centers of trade in Europe, the Caribbean, South America, California, and China. The commercial activity along South Street had by the mid-nineteenth century transformed New York from a former British colonial outpost, into the largest city in the United States that controlled half the country’s trade.

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From Veranda Magazine:

Aaron Burr’s West Village Home Is for Sale

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I previously went on a different tour with Boroughs Of The Dead, and receive e-mail from them:

NEW Tour! Lovecraft in Brooklyn

 

Boroughs of the Dead is excited to announce a brand new tour in partnership with writer, tour guide, and H.P. Lovecraft aficionado Jane Rose. “Lovecraft in Brooklyn follows the trajectory of the writer’s time living in Flatbush and Brooklyn Heights in the 1920s – a brief, difficult, but ultimately artistically significant period in the author’s life.
BUY TICKETSMore About The Tour

Twentieth-century horror writer Howard Phillips Lovecraft, whose persona and works are closely tied with his native Providence, RI, spent just over two years living in Brooklyn. Beset by a troubled marriage, financial difficulties, and a phobia of New York’s immigrant population, Lovecraft produced only a few stories while living in the city – works reflecting his attitude toward the teeming metropolis. Lovecraft’s time in Brooklyn, although difficult, proved transformative. Upon returning to Providence, H. P. Lovecraft would immediately produce his most masterful and best-loved works.

This tour will trace a path from Lovecraft’s high hopes at the beginning of his Brooklyn sojourn in Flatbush, to tough times in the area now known as Brooklyn Heights, and artistic renewal beyond. While Lovecraft, an avid walker and antiquarian, roamed New York City and its surroundings widely, this tour will focus specifically on his ties to Brooklyn, exploring his impressions and inspirations along the way.

The tour will take place in two sections, with a prequel in Flatbush and main section in Brooklyn Heights. Attendees can come to either section, but both are strongly recommended in order to get a full picture of Lovecraft’s life while in Brooklyn. Transportation time is allowed between the sections. Admission covers both sections.

Dates, Times & Tickets

Saturday, May 27 10:30am*
Saturday, June 10 at 10:30am*
Additional dates to be announced in Summer/Fall 2017
Visit our website to purchase tickets
Advance purchase is strongly recommended

* Tour meets at 12:15pm if you are meeting at Borough Hall in Brooklyn Heights for the second half of the tour only; additional meeting point details, directions, etc. are provided to ticket holders.

About the Tour Guide

Jane Rose comes by her interest in H.P. Lovecraft, weird horror, and the supernatural honestly due to her upbringing in rural New Hampshire, where crumbling Colonial houses and centuries-old graveyards abound. A writer, filmmaker, and sometime special FX makeup artist, her movies have screened at the H.P. Lovecraft Film Festival in Portland, Oregon, and elsewhere. Ms. Rose created and designed the “Lovecraft in Brooklyn” tour, which she previously led with the former Morbid Anatomy Museum.

Contact:

www.boroughsofthedead.com
info@boroughsofthedead.com
917-409-8533

NYC’s #1 Ghost Tour

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www.boroughsofthedead.com
info@boroughsofthedead.com
917-409-8533

Boroughs of the Dead is a unique tour company devoted to strange, dark, and unusual walking tours of New York City.

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This email was sent to lbrose@hotmail.com
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Before religion in the public sphere became something people argued about, some people took it upon themselves to make a public display of Christian affiliation for Easter 1956 by lighting up the windows of some of the more prominent skyscrapers of the NYC in the shape of crosses…

NYC skyline, Easter 1956 from nyc

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From Gothamist:

A Look At 1980s NYC Through The Lens Of A Teenager

Through the magical and bittersweet filter of nostalgia, it’s possible to look back at photos of 1980s New York City—a decade that followed one of the toughest in the city’s history—and think: ah, the good ol’ days. Recent transplants will say it, speaking some pseudo-knowledge and pointing to the dearth of combination Chase Bank-Duane Reades on the streets back then. But those who lived it know exactly what they miss.

Native Ken Stein has just shared some of his old photos from the decade with us, taken from 1980 through 1989. Stein was a teenager when he took most of these, and tells us, “The city was different back then. I think it was quieter, the street lights were darker, there was more room to walk and more places to wander—often everything seemed new and the different areas of the city were just that; different.”

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1983. (Photo by Ken Stein)

Stein continued:

Most of those images were shot in 1982 and 83. I was 17 and 18 year old and was the staff photographer for a weekly community newspaper in The Bronx.These images are part of a larger collection that were shot on slide film—a rare luxury for me because it was far more expensive than the black & white I could get and develop for free. Hugh Bell, the famous jazz era and commercial photographer who died after Sandy knocked out the electricity in lower Manhattan, was a huge influence on me.

Taking pictures was always thrilling and I loved the way it made me feel. It felt at times I was the only one taking pictures—I think that’s why people let me take their photos. It was a rare occurrence and I was bold as fuck back then.

Click through for a look, and you can check out a few more on his Flickr page.

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from pulsd:
Vintage & Costume Shopping: Sips & Eats
Vintage & Costume Shopping: Sips & Eats
Look For Vintage & Costume Finds While Enjoying Sips, Eats, And Vibes At Gemini & Scorpio
255 Douglass Street |
Today
1:00PM – 6:00PM

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In 1883 Mrs. William K. (Alva) Vanderbilt was determined for her family to be accepted into proper society although The Mrs. Astor, the gatekeeper of the exclusive 400, had done everything to keep out the tacky nouveau riche. To her, the Vanderbilts were vulgar and their ostentatious display of wealth were garish and offensive. But after William and Alva built their majestic ‘Petit Chateau’ at 660 Fifth Avenue, they could no longer be ignored. The Vanderbilts opened their majestic home by throwing an extravagant party and invited New York’s leading families. By manipulating the press and the city’s elite, Alva masterfully forced Mrs. Astor to accept her and the Vanderbilts into her rarified circle. Join us as we present the details and drama surrounding this ball and learn how gilded age society was consumed by its own excess.

NOTE: There is one flight of stairs to event space.

Tickets are $35 through eventbrite.com

INSTAGRAM @colonnaderow + @mansionsofthegildedage

Click here for Facebook page

Date and Time

Sun, April 9, 2017

4:00 PM – 6:00 PM EDT

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Location

Colonnade Row

New York, NY 10003

View Map

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On View April 7–August 20, 2017

The first major museum exhibition to focus on American taste during the creative explosion of the 1920s,The Jazz Age will be a multi-media experience of more than 400  examples of interior design, industrial design, decorative art, jewelry, fashion, architecture, music, and film. Giving full expression to the decade’s diversity and dynamism, The Jazz Age will define the American spirit of the period. Find out more.

The Jazz Age: American Style in the 1920s is co-organized by Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum and the Cleveland Museum of Art.

Supporters

The Jazz Age: American Style in the 1920s is made possible by the generous support of Madeleine K. Rudin and Grant S. Johnson in memory of Jack Rudin.

Additional major support is provided by Amita and Purnendu Chatterjee, Robert and Helen Appel, Helen and Edward Hintz, and the Secretary of the Smithsonian and the Smithsonian National Board. Funding is also provided by the August Heckscher Exhibition Fund, The Masinter Family Foundation, Shelby and Frederick Gans, Marlene Nathan Meyerson Family Foundation, Ehrenkranz Fund, Esme Usdan Exhibition Endowment Fund, Siegelson, New York, Cooper Hewitt Master’s Program Fund, Karen and Joe Levine, and The Felicia Fund.

Jeweled Splendors of the art deco era: the prince and princess sadruddin aga khan collection

PantherVanityCase

On view April 7–August 27, 2017

Over 100 extraordinary examples of cigarette and vanity cases, compacts, clocks and timepieces, and other luxury objects will be installed in the Teak Room, including exquisite works from the premier jewelry houses of Europe and America. Personal gifts from Prince Sadruddin Aga Khan (1933–2003) to his wife, Catherine (b. 1938), the collection was amassed over three decades and displays the excitement, innovation and creativity of the art deco era at its most luxurious.

Opening Party

Celebrate the opening of The Jazz Age and be the first to see the exhibition! Become a member today.

Featured Image: Egyptian Bracelet, ca. 1925; Produced by Lacloche Frères (Paris, France); Diamonds, turquoise, sapphires, mother-of-pearl, onyx, black pearls, smoky quartz, tourmaline, gold, platinum; 17.9 x 4 cm (7 1/16 x 1 9/16 in.); Private Collection; Photo Credit: Matt Flynn

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The Women Who Made New York


Julie Scelfo

Author Event
Thursday April 06, 2017 7:00 PM
(History, Cultural Studies)
Event Description
Read any history of New York City and you will read about men. But that’s not the whole story. Julie Scelfo reveals the untold stories of the phenomenal women who made NYC the cultural epicenter of the world. Many were revolutionaries and activists; others were icons and iconoclasts. Some led quiet lives, but were influential. Scelfo reinvigorates not just New York’s history but its very identity.

Special Instructions
Seating is limited and available on a first-come, first-serve basis. Books can be purchased after signing. If you have questions or concerns, email crm19792@bn.com or ask a bookseller for more information. facebook.com/bnupperwestside

82nd & Broadway

2289 Broadway
New York, NY 10024
212-362-8835

Store Hours:

9-10 Every Day

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from The West Side Rag:

ENJOY A WEEKEND OF INTERDISCIPLINARY PROGRAMMING WITH THE BARD GRADUATE CENTER FOCUS FESTIVAL

SPONSORED

Focus Festival

Bard Graduate Center’s inaugural Focus Festival, April 8-9, 2017, brings thinkers and artists together for a weekend of interdisciplinary programming that draws inspiration from the key themes of our two spring Focus Project exhibitions: Design by the Book: Chinese Ritual Objects and the Sanli tu and  New York Crystal Palace 1853.

Claudia Rankine, 2016 MacArthur Fellow, poet, and essayist, will join Garnette Cadogan, essayist, in the keynote conversation “Ways of Seeing the City” on April 8 at 7 pm. Additional programs include a talk by Michael Puett, author of the New York Times bestseller The Path (April 9, 5 pm); walking tours of the Seneca Village site in Central Park with archaeologist Cynthia Copeland (April 8, 3 pm) and “Branding Fifth Avenue & the Other NY” with Jack Tchen, co-founder of the Museum of Chinese in America (April 9, 12 pm); and performances of Aaron Landsman’s critically acclaimed Love Story, a theatrical piece about a disappearing city, two people navigating it, and a fidgety, obsessive follower (April 8, 5:30 pm and April 9, 3:30 pm). Curators will offer spotlight tours of the exhibitions (April 8 and 9, 12 pm). Family-friendly workshops will be a special treat for kids (April 8 and 9, 1 pm).

For information, tickets, and the full schedule of events, click here.

Wendy’s Subway Reading Room
In conjunction Focus Project exhibitions, Brooklyn-based literary organization Wendy’s Subway has curated a Reading Room in the ground floor of the Gallery at 18 West 86 Street.

Wendy’s Subway Reading Room at Bard Graduate Center promotes engagement with artists’ books, periodicals, and other publications selected for their relationship to the spring exhibitions and public programming. A series of readings and writing workshops that gather together some of the boldest voices from poetry, literature, and performance will accompany the installation. Over the course of the installation, visitors are invited to drop off books they would like included in the Reading Room. Admission to the reading room is free, as is the wifi. It will be open during all public hours. Book suggestions may also be offered via a feedback box in the Gallery.

Wendy’s Subway launches the first of its monthly Reading Series on April 26 with an evening reading of works by Layli Longsoldier, Julian Talamantez Brolaski, and Wendy Xu. Read more.

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