Month :

Jul ,2017

From Bowery Boogie:

Breaking: ‘Cup & Saucer’ Ending Service on Monday After Decades on Canal Street

Posted on: July 12th, 2017 at 12:39 pm by

Say goodbye to that classic 1940s Coca-Cola sign at the corner of Eldridge and Canal Streets. Word on the block is that the fabled luncheonette, Cup & Saucer, is hanging it up. It’s closing shop after decades serving the neighborhood, thanks to a steep rent hike.

And there’s no time for you to process this information, either, as the last day of business is Monday.

Every few years, rumors surface detailing a demise that was continuously eluded. Especially after the building reportedly sold several years ago, creating much uncertainty whether the business would actually survive. Co-owner John Vasilopoulos told Metro in 2015 that he hoped the new owner would maintain the 5-year lease arrangement of the predecessor to keep afloat. Then there was the recent upstairs fire back in January, which no doubt threatened the operation. This time, however, it appears the talk is true. A tipster who frequents the establishment daily was informed by staff of the closure. Apparently, they started telling all the regular customers today.

We don’t really know what to say. The Cup & Saucer is a no-frills Lower East Side treasure that serves all strata of the community. “Giving the people of New York quality food, fast delivery, and great customer service,” as its website prominently touts. On any given morning, you find construction workers, commuters, travelers, and locals mingling at the countertop.

It’s been under the same ownership for nearly thirty years. Partners Nick Castanos (also a cook) and John Vasilopoulos took over the business in 1988, yet local lore suggests the corner kitchen dates back some 77 years. The duo also owns a diner in Ridgewood, Queens.

Our tipster surmises that the luncheonette also fell victim to the effects of failed development (i.e. the Canal Tower) and the encroaching Chinatown Bus situation that’s multiplying along Canal Street between Forsyth and Allen.


Visual Documentation of the distinguishing interior features of the now-bygone The Cup & Saucer Luncheonette (from Untapped Cities.com)

Iconic NYC Diner “The Cup & Saucer” Closing Down After Nearly 70 Years

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 E-mailed newsletter from Denny Daniel:
Hi Hi!

It was hard to pick interesting things for this monthly news thingy. We got some really cool stuff! Scroll down to see some. I have been posting really cool stuff on our Instagram & FB & Twitter like our Tesla show (where I met his oldest relative) and new box openings 🙂 Below is also info on Museum show Themes and Booking info of course too 🙂

And best of all the Summer of Love Secret Speakeasy and 3D VHS fest coming up and so many more shows!

– Sun July 23rd, 2017 6pm-10pm all ages
is the Museum Summer of Love Secret Speakeasy

We will debut vintage 16mm films of Bob Dylan, The Beatles, Jefferson Airplane and more! And have clothes you take selfies with!
http://www.secretspeakeasy.com/

** If you want the Museum to come to you or to visit see below or just email or call.

– Thur July 20th, 2017 7pm we are at the City Reliquary for a 3D VHS fest! Our 1st there!
https://www.facebook.com/events/1928505230514357/?acontext=%7B%22ref%22%3A%2222%22%2C%22feed_story_type%22%3A%2222%22%2C%22action_history%22%3A%22null%22%7D&pnref=story

– Sat July 15th, 2017 5pm-7pm the Adventure Club (the coolest site!) has our 16mm Jazz fest
https://www.eventbrite.com/e/the-history-of-film-through-short-film-screenings-rare-16mm-jazz-soundies-registration-35356195332

Cool News! someone came to the Speakeasy and did a wonderful article and video.
http://bedfordandbowery.com/2017/06/the-museum-of-interesting-things-is-a-roving-speakeasy-run-by-a-quirky-curator/

The Museum got some cool new things (I put some pics below for you to check out)

You can now visit our offices on Broadway!  woohoo 🙂
Details are below to schedule a visit here or to have the Museum come to you.

I send only 1 email a month but if you wanna see more pics, events or learn more interesting things then FB the Museum. 🙂 
https://www.facebook.com/museumthings

NOW WE HAVE Instagram
https://www.instagram.com/museumthings/

And even Twitter! (using carrier pigeon of course!)
https://twitter.com/dennydaniel

– Teachers/Event gurus, Librarians, humans, the Museum has sooo many new items and themed exhibitions in nearly every subject from science to history / music to photography and more that we can bring to your school or event email or call.
We have some great themes listed below like Eureka! The History of Invention, The Windup Circus & the 16mm Sing-A-Long and other 16mm festivals like music, jazz, Animation, Space and WW2,  The History of Communication, photography, the 3D VHS fest, also science, Suffragettes, WW2/cold war antiques and any era of history and even math and music!

Dennydanielx@gmail.com 212 274 8757
www.museumofinterestingthings.com

– Here are some library shows, Mineola Libr Jul 22 10-5, Port Jeff Libr 11am adults & 2pm kids July 29th Roosevelt Library Aug 1 at 1pm .

– Also, scroll down, we are partnering with many companies to get you guys discounts on food and things like Doc Mac & TAJ AND our newest partner a 10% discount at Once Upon A Tart if you mention the Museum, see below 🙂

– Last but certainly not least…More More More New Things are below too! Soon we will launch our YouTube channel with Box Openings and more! Stay tuned….

More details for everything below  🙂

Hope to catch ya sooooon!

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Officially releasing on July 15th, the book Secret Brooklyn: An Unusual Guide is written and photographed by Untapped Cities founder Michelle Young and co-founder Augustin Pasquet. To celebrate, we’ll be hosting a launch party for the book on Thursday, July 13th at the Brooklyn Superhero Supply Co., one of the 100+ amazing places in this book.

The party is produced in partnership with the website Brokelyn and will feature a presentation by Michelle and Augustin about their favorite spots and the process of making this book. Refreshments will be served and there will be opportunity to purchase books, get them autographed and meet the authors.

Entry is free, but RSVP is required:

Book Now

Can’t make the event? Purchase the book on Amazon here: http://amzn.to/2tVS4r9

Here’s a little preview of what’s inside:

Discover secret museums, go on an urban safari for wild parrots, locate a landmarked tree, enter the oldest building in New York City, watch a performance of robots in a church, stand tall next to hobbit doors on an otherwise normal residential street, learn how to breathe fire, swallow swords, hammer a nail into your skull and charm a snake, touch the oldest subway tunnel in the world and the world’s smallest Torah, forage for food in Prospect Park, taste wine atop the world’s first commercial rooftop vineyard, step inside a grocery store frozen in 1939, take in a basketball game inside a historic movie theater.

Brooklyn offers countless opportunities to step off the beaten path and is home to any number of well-hidden treasures that are revealed only to residents and travelers who are ready to explore. Secret Brooklyn An Unusual Guide is an indispensable guide for those who think they already know Brooklyn or would like to discover its hidden places, taking you far from the crowds and the usual clichés.

 Brooklyn Superhero Supply Co., Secret Brooklyn: An Unusual Guid

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This documentary travelogue of New York City was made by a team of cameramen with the Swedish company Svenska Biografteatern, who were sent around the world to make pictures of well-known places. (They also filmed at Niagara Falls and in Paris, Monte Carlo, and Venice, although New York 1911 is the only selection in the Museum’s collection.) Opening and closing with shots of the Statue of Liberty, the film also includes New York Harbor; Battery Park and the John Ericsson statue; the elevated railways at Bowery and Worth Streets; Broadway sights like Grace Church and Mark Cross; the Flatiron Building on Fifth Avenue; and Madison Avenue. Produced only three years before the outbreak of World War I, the everyday life of the city recorded here—street traffic, people going about their business—has a casual, almost pastoral quality that differs from the modernist perspective of later city-symphony films like Paul Strand and Charles Sheeler’s Manhatta (1921). Take note of the surprising and remarkably timeless expression of boredom exhibited by a young girl filmed as she was chauffeured down Fifth Avenue in the front seat of a convertible limousine.

MoMA’s restoration of New York 1911 is derived from the original nitrate print of the film.

New York 1911. 1911. Sweden. Produced by Svenska Biografteatern. Silent, with music by Ben Model. 9 min.

This presentation is part of an ongoing series that makes film and video works from MoMA’s collection available online.

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Tuesday, July 11, 2017 6:30-8:00 pm

Anthony W. Robins Book Talk

New York Art Deco
A Guide to Gotham’s Jazz Age Architecture

SUNY Press, 2017

Lively and informative, New York Art Deco leads readers step-by-step past the monuments of the 1920s and ’30s that recast New York as the world’s modern metropolis. Anthony W. Robins new walking tour guidebook traces itineraries in Manhattan and across the boroughs. Maps by John Tauranac and color plates by Art Deco photographer Randy Juster enrich the mix. Join Tony for a talk that distills his thirty years experience hunting the urban Art Deco.

A native New Yorker, Anthony W. Robins is the author of books on Grand Central Terminal, the World Trade Center, and the art and architecture of the New York subway system. A popular leader of walking tours all over the city, he specializes in Art Deco, having organized series for many organizations, including the Art Deco Society of New York and the Municipal Art Society. He is the recipient of the 2017 Guiding Spirit Award from the Guides Association of New York City.

The Skyscraper Museum offers 1.5 LUs for AIA Members for this program.

Reservations are required, and priority is given to Members and Corporate Member firms and their employees.
All guests MUST RSVP to programs@skyscraper.org to assure admittance to the event. Not a member? Become a Museum member today!

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The Grand Neptune Ball

Open Bar. Live Band. High Seas. (A Fundraiser.)

A celebration on the historic Waterfront Museum Barge –  a boat and nonprofit that is raising funds for renewed arts and education programs after our Superstorm Sandy refit.

Join us for free local fare and spirits! And for the midsummer sunset! Come to dance to live jazz! Come as your most extravagant self! Come support arts and education aboard the historic barge!! Cocktail attire, and any a nod to the maritime 1920s, is encouraged. Music by Steve Oates and the Zac Greenberg Quartet.

The Waterfront Barge
July 22, 2017 at 8-11pm
290 Conover St. Brooklyn, NY
Tickets $50 – $100 (Tax-deductible)

Tickets can be purchased here and at the door.

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Our New Exhibit begins : July 11

Controversial  elections, voting rights, abolition and slavery!  In 1820s New York, while these issues burned in  the minds of the public—newspapers exploded  and competed  as  forums for debate!    This exhibit looks at the newly exploding  newspaper industry  of the 1820s –and the entry of  women and African Americans into the business of print.

At Mount Vernon Hotel Museum & Garden

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From The New York Times:

Photo

The railroad station at Westchester Avenue was designed by Cass Gilbert and is considered endangered. Credit Left, Library of Congress; Nicole Bengiveno/The New York Times

Built in 1908 and designed by Cass Gilbert, those that have not been demolished are near collapse, like the Westchester Avenue station. It is a sublime glazed terra-cotta temple, its little tragedy now exposed on all four sides with the opening of the new Concrete Plant Park.

A dozen stations were projected in 1904, when the railroad began upgrading the Harlem River Branch from the southern Bronx up to New Rochelle. But not all were built and, in addition to Westchester Avenue, three survive today: Morris Park, Hunts Point Avenue and City Island, which is a ruined shell. (The historian Joseph Brennan has closely investigated the stations and has posted his research at columbia.edu/~brennan.)

Gilbert, newly minted as a starchitect with the 1899 commission for the United States Custom House at Bowling Green, got the job of designing the stations, and gave them widely different styles.

The Morris Park station was chunky and low, with arched windows framed by brightly colored terra-cotta bands that also ran under the eaves. Oddly shaped iron torchiers gave it something of the feel of the Secession style as practiced contemporaneously in Austria, although Gilbert was anything but adventurous.

Photo

The Morris Park station as it appeared in 1915 and today. Credit Top, Library of Congress; Nicole Bengiveno/The New York Times

That said, his Westchester Avenue and Hunts Point Avenue stations are particularly striking. At Westchester Avenue the station projects out over the tracks, and so floats on a frame of steel. At street level, high above the rails, the main tower is a little display case of glazed terra cotta, cream-colored panels set off by colored floral medallions, lozenges and crisscross bands in gold, azure and dark red.

It is hard to decipher from old photographs and present conditions, but the portion over the tracks looks as if the terra-cotta panels were framed in iron straps. These must have been painted, but are now pure rust, giving the building a strange, skeletal aspect.

The Hunts Point Avenue station, just visible from the northbound Bruckner Expressway, bridges the tracks from one side to the other, along the avenue. French Renaissance in style, it might have been the royal stable of a French king. The delicate copper roof cresting had spikes big enough to impale an ox, and below run lines of little scalloped dormers.

In 1909, The Real Estate Record and Guide noted the “marked architectural beauty” of the new stations. John A. Droege, in his 1916 book “Passenger Terminals and Trains” (McGraw-Hill) noted that “the ordinary wayside passenger station is not the proper field for the architect who wishes to rival the designer of the Paris opera house.” But he reviewed Gilbert’s stations in depth, apparently with approval.…

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Take a fascinatingly risqué journey through time at this immersive lecture and multi-act burlesque show.

  • Sunday, July 9, 2017
  • 7:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m.
  • $20.00 USD
  • 635 Sackett Street, Brooklyn, New York, 11217, United States

Join the Atlas Obscura Society New York for an evening of bawdy discovery and lively libations as we delve into the history of burlesque, an enchanting form of performance that has shimmied, shaked, and shifted with the times over a transformative century in America.

The sensational Doctor Lucky, the World’s Premiere Ph(Double)D, will be your guide as we fill your imaginations with titillating tales from the past. Doctor Lucky’s long and deep resume includes the production of many popular burlesque shows and the instruction of students at prestigious establishments such as NYU, MICA, and CUNY on “The History of American Burlesque.”

As Lucky chronicles the story of burlesque, a dazzling array of in-the-flesh performances will demonstrate a range of burlesque styles from the past and present. You’ll be invited to sip from specialty cocktails prepared by the bar as you’re swept away by revealing historical revelations on the new, state-of-the-art Littlefield stage.

Performers for this event have been curated to include many of the greatest currently operating in the New York scene: Gin Minsky, Corvette Le Face, Ms. Tickle, Perle NoireLil’ Miss Lixx and the Lady Aye.

DETAILS

QUESTIONS?

Email michelle.bruenn@atlasobscura.com.

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From The North Shore Local-Staten Island Local:

SI Then: The Goethals Bridge

After the First World War, the U.S. was on the move.

With the new prosperity, wanderlust and mass-produced automobiles, the Goethals Bridge was built to accommodate interstate travel.

The bridge opened on June 29, 1928, the same day as the Outerbridge Crossing. Both were designed by John Alexander Low Waddell. This was the first successful bi-state development project by the then-new Port Authority. It sported two 10-foot-wide lanes in each direction.

The new bridge was named after Major General George W. Goethals. Construction supervisor of the Panama Canal and the first consulting engineer of the NY/NJ Port Authority, he died just three months before the bridge’s opening, which also would have been his 70th birthday.

The same month saw the establishment of the Port Authority Police. Its 40 original officers, known as Bridgemen, were deployed to patrol and protect both the Outerbridge and the Goethals bridges.

The Goethals did not recoup its original construction costs until 1964, when the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge was completed.

This year, 3,566,101 EZpass equipped vehicles crossed over it between January and March.

It was finally closed this month when the first of two new parallel bridges opened to replace it. The second will open in 2018. Built higher and wider, they will accommodate more traffic and larger ships passing under them.

Until it is finally dismantled, the original Goethals is truly now only a bridge to the past.


As of July 4th, 2017, the original Goethals Bridge is closed for good, and the first of the new parallel bridges has been officially opened. What name, if any, will be given to them, remains to be seen.

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