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Aug ,2017

Thu 08 2017 , by

Bygone Stables

From The New York Post:

The fascinating history behind NYC’s stables-turned-real estate

Washington Mews, a little alley north of Washington Square Park, is an urban gem. Still paved with Belgian block and lined with quaint cottages, it’s a Greenwich Village street that might as well be in Europe. In fact, cities like London and Paris are filled with these tiny picturesque thoroughfares, whose cute little homes once stabled horses, carriages and sleighs.

Due to quirks in New York’s history and design, these mews are exceedingly rare in the city, making carriage-house living both scarce and coveted. Often disguised behind modest, original facades, many converted carriage homes contain architectural wonders hidden from view.

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Washington Mews: One of Manhattan’s rare alleys lined with former stables, this stretch was designed to service a row of 1830s homes along Washington Square Park.Annie Wermiel/NY Post

Take investor David Aldea’s home at 23 Cornelia St., which Taylor Swift rented in 2016. The 5,500-square-foot West Village pad was asking $40,000/month then, and is on the market with Corcoran for $24.5 million. Walking down the street, the home’s massive, arched wooden doors hint at its 1912 carriage house origins, but the unprepossessing facade might not stop passersby in their tracks.

Upon entering, however, it’s clear this is no ordinary stable: today, the garden level is graced by a 25-foot swimming pool, while an ornate Murano glass chandelier hangs from double-height ceilings. But, as Aldea notes, despite these modern touches, original details abound, particularly in the living room, where there are “24-inch square windows that would have been for the horses to stick their heads out for ventilation.”

Considering the fact that New York was a horse-and-carriage town for so many centuries, it’s surprising that there aren’t more such conversions. That’s in part because most remnants of the city’s colonial days are long gone. Also, Manhattan’s populated areas used to be far more compact; their borders barely extended north of today’s City Hall until the 1820s. The majority of New Yorkers, it seems, walked almost everywhere nearly two centuries ago.

A new street layout in the first decades of the 19th century helped the city expand, and travel by private carriage became more common — but only for the city’s elite. So few New Yorkers could afford to maintain a horse that when a commission laid out the city’s famous grid in 1811, the plan purposely excluded rear alleys for stables. Even by the Civil War, a mere 3 percent of NYC residents owned their own horses and carriages.

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Annie Wermiel/NY Post

A few early mews still exist. Take Washington Mews, which was erected behind the stately homes of “The Row,” one of New York’s first planned “terraces” of homes — a clear sign that the 1832-built Washington Square townhouses were only for the well-heeled.

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From silive.com:

Developer files plans to build on site of 90-year-old Staten Island church

This 1983 photo from the Advance archives shows the original Holy Rosary R.C. Church and adjacent rectory on Sand Lane in South Beach. A developer has filed plans to demolish the church and rectory and build eight semi- attached homes on the property. (Staten Island Advance)
This 1983 photo from the Advance archives shows the original Holy Rosary R.C. Church and adjacent rectory on Sand Lane in South Beach. A developer has filed plans to demolish the church and rectory and build eight semi- attached homes on the property. (Staten Island Advance)
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STATEN ISLAND, N.Y. — A Staten Island developer has filed plans to build eight semi-attached homes on the site of the original Holy Rosary R.C. Church in South Beach.

According to Building Department records, Mitchell Pacifico, a principal of Mp Realty Holding Corp., Travis, who is listed as owner, plans to build eight semi-attached homes over four 45 x 100 lots on Sand Lane.

The lots would be sub-divided from the original parcel at 207 Sand Lane, and the church and adjacent rectory on the site demolished.

Pacifico said he bid on the property after seeing it for sale on the Multiple Listing Service (MLS). He would not disclose the amount, but public records indicate the property sold for $1.5 million.

The new construction would be marketed as Sand Lane Estates. Peter Calvanico, of Calvanico Associates, Willowbrook, is listed as the architect for the project.

Pacifico described the project as “high end” three-bedroom semi-attached homes, with full basements, each with a living room, dining room and eat-in-kitchen. He said construction could begin by early spring.

The 90-year-old stucco and wood-frame church, built by hand by Italian immigrants, is located two blocks from the Franklin Delano Roosevelt Boardwalk in South Beach. It served as a neighborhood mobilization center during Hurricane Sandy in 2012, but has not been used for mass since 2015, according to the Rev. Michael Martine, pastor of Holy Rosary.

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According to the pastor, the church suffered heavy water damage in March 2016 when the original pipes burst, causing water to damage the ceiling and walls. The building was deemed irreparable.

Father Martine said the proceeds from the sale “will greatly improve the financial position of our parish.” He said the money would go toward retiring the debt the parish incurred with the building of the new Holy Rosary Church, at 120 Jerome Ave., in the early 1990s, as well as the Father Dominic Epifano Parish Center across the street, that was built a few years later, in early 2000s. A new boiler will also be purchased for the adjacent Holy Rosary School, which was built in the 1950s.

Holy Rosary has preserved and restored an original hand-carved wooden crucifix as well as a fresco painting that was displayed over the altar in the Sand Lane church. Both are now in the daily mass chapel of the Jerome Avenue church.

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From “off the Grid”, website of the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation:

The Glittering and Gritty History of 24 Bond

If you happen to look up while strolling down Bond or Lafayette Streets, you might come upon a curious sight – dozens of small, golden statues dancing along the wrought iron and brick of a traditional NoHo facade. Celebratory and airy, they’re a delightful addition to the heavy, industrial look of the rest of the area. Who do we have to thank for this artistic juxtaposition? Artist and 24 Bond resident Bruce Williams.

Williams and his wife have lived in the building for over twenty years, and he first began adorning his building’s facade in 1998. At the time, the NoHo neighborhood was much more off the beaten path than now, a small enclave for artists working in a variety of mediums. Since then, the neighborhood has gained quite a bit more distinction, glamour, and recognition. In 2008, 24 Bond Street was included in the NoHo Historic District Extension, officially recognizing the architectural significance of this 19th-century building. To celebrate, Williams added additional golden sculptures climbing up the side of his now-landmarked building. He did this, as he had always done, without asking for approval, but the new landmark status of his building required that he confer with the LPC. Despite a small ado requiring an official hearing on the outdoor art, the spritely statues were permitted to stay.

But those sculptures aren’t the only piece of artistic legacy at 24 Bond. Robert Mapplethorpe occupied a studio on the fifth floor of 24 Bond from the 1970s until his death in 1989. In this cavernous space, Mapplethorpe would invite his subjects to “do drugs, have sex, and then be photographed.” 24 Bond was infamous – Edward Mapplethorpe, Robert’s brother, said it was “so sexually charged that you needed to be pretty certain of who you were to be around it on a day-to-day basis.” Mapplethorpe photographed legions of downtown superstars in his NoHo loft, including frequent collaborator Patti Smith. It was here that they filmed 1978’s “Still Moving” which appeared at the Stephen Miller Gallery and was Smith and Mapplethorpe’s only joint exhibition.

Patti Smith, taken by Robert Mapplethorpe. It is believed that this photo is taken on Mapplethorpe’s 5th floor studio at 24 Bond.

The same year that Mapplethorpe died, the Gene Frankel Theatre moved into the ground floor of the Bond Street building. Already a well-regarded theater with serious Village bonafides, once at 24 Bond the theater nurtured the careers of burgeoning actors and exhibited bold and progressive works. Although Frankel himself died in 2005, the theater still operates out of the ground floor space, advancing its mission to nurture living playwrights and artists and to “revive NoHo as a cauldron of LGBTQI art and ideas by producing new works.”

Considering the building’s long legacy as an arts space, those gold dancers on the facade seem to fit right in.

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In their special section “Summer Fun in Staten Island,” published on June 28, 2017, the New York Daily News said that our monthly Sea Shanty Sessions, led by the Folk Music Society of New York, offer “…a great opportunity to experience authentic, time-honored maritime songs in an appropriately historic setting.” The next session is this Sunday, August 20, from 2 to 5 PM. This even is family friendly and free, but we always appreciate your donations. #NYCulture

Image may contain: 8 people, people smiling

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Capturing the Lower East Side’s Disappearing Mom-and-Pop Storefronts, a photography and oral history exhibition, opens tonight, 6pm, at Theater For The New City Gallery, 155 1st Ave [10th]. It’s curated by James and Karla Murray, the husband-and-wife photography team that have documented so many mom-and pop-storefronts, compiled in their books Store Front: The Disappearing Face of New York and its followup.

The show is intended to raise awareness of the essential NYC character that these businesses embody, threatened by skyrocketing rents. You’ll see the work of 30 photographers who participated in two workshops in April and June with the Murrays focusing on neighborhood stores. Since the workshops took place, two of the stores photographed by participants have closed.

The event is free and there will be complimentary wine and beer, as well as small bites, provided by local indie merchants, of course.…

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Thomas Paine and The Flame Of Revolution“-from ThoughtGallery.org:

When: Thu., August 17, 2017 at 7:30 pm

This Olio covers the life and writing of Thomas Paine during the end of the 18th century. Starting with Common Sense and The Crisis Papers, the talk focuses on the integral role of Paine in not only the American Revolution, but the creation of an “American” political ideology.

The first part is a biographical sketch of Thomas Paine and description of the social and political climate in 18th century England. An explanation of conflicts leading up to the writing of Common Sense and The Declaration of Independence, the talks establishes a historical context for the American Revolution and the subsequent events in the young nation. Thomas Paine’s involvement in the revolution and his work for the Continental Congress place him in the center of activity.

The French Revolution signaled a new chapter in Paine’s life. Once again with The Rights of Man and The Age of Reason he was able to put into words the momentous spirit of the times. This Olio explains the characterization of Paine as a preeminent philosopher and the genesis of radical politics as a force in world events.

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From Spoiled NYC:

The Sound of Silence: A Tribute To Webster Hall

Subscribe to spoiled NYC’s official newsletter, The Stoop, for the best news, eats, drinks, places to go, and things to do.

For 131 years, Webster Hall has hosted some of the world’s biggest musical acts. Today it closes its doors– at least until it reopens under new ownership, sold in a deal worth an estimated $35 million.

The space, with a maximum capacity of 2,500 people, served as a nightclub, concert venue, corporate events space, and recording studio.

It will reopen in either 2019 or 2020 as the newly christened Spectrum Hall, its space restricted to concerts and sporting events.

I received the phone call in early May. A friend of mine told me management had served all Webster Hall employees with termination notices.

True, it had been a couple of years since I’d set foot in the venue, but a part of me heaved a pained sigh for yet another victim of the city’s changing landscape, for the many dances I’d shared with fellow miscreants who streamed into the place, their wrists ablaze with the shades of kandi bracelets and multi-colored fluffies.

I remembered the faces of the girls I kissed as vividly as I recalled those of the men I kissed– or shyly didn’t kiss. I recoiled at the memory of the crappy wage I made at the time, of the overpriced drinks, the even more overpriced water bottles, a precious commodity in a space that scorched with summer heat even in midwinter.

The people I met there ran the gamut, from frat bros with cockeyed grins, to scene kids with more gumption than me, roadsters who surveyed groups of three or more, code switching and peddling ketamine all the while.

Mirrored behavior existed on the far more spacious dance floor at Amazura Concert Hall in Queens or the even more cramped Electric Warehouse in Brooklyn, and the East Village had long given way to millennial kink, this host of music, bodies, motion, and silent exchanges in bathroom stalls.

“Webster had that old-time New York grunge that made you feel like you were part of the 19th century, in the sense that “fun” could easily involve trying to locate your stolen purse/phone,” says Michael Yates, formerly of Harlem and now living in Los Angeles.

“I’ll miss it. I’m sure the new version of the inside will look fantastic and modern and have a pleasant aroma. Old style Webster Hall was my first immersion into NYC’s EDM scene at the time. It was a place that was magical in the dark, probably because it would look awful when illuminated by sunlight.”

websterhall Having our friend @Halsey visit for an intimate show in the The Studio at Webster Hall tonight before we close for renovations in August. Stay tuned for more surprise shows leading up till then!

The venue, Yates continues, is a “perfect example” of New York City’s infrastructure.

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From Governors Island official calendar: Civil War Weekend 2017
Aug 12, 2017 – Aug 13
10:00 am – 4:30 pm
Governors Island National Monument
Presented by the National Park ServiceMeet Union soldiers in the Soldier’s camp, watch musket and artillery firing demonstrations, and listen to Civil War music performances!

Artillery Demonstration and Small Arms Demonstration
Watch us fire a real 1860s-era cannon and demonstrate a variety of muskets soldiers would have used during that time period.

Getting There
5 Minutes from Soissons Landing 10 Minutes from Yankee Pier
3 Minutes from Soissons Landing 5 Minutes from Yankee Pier

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The Cemetery will be open on Sunday, August 6th from noon to 6:00 pm.
Come and enjoy a lovely and rare afternoon inside the gates!

Welcome to the web site of The New York City Marble Cemetery.

You have most likely come here as part of genealogical research on your family and we are happy for you to visit. This site may well be of some help to you; we certainly hope so.

We also hope that you will be able to be of help to The New York City Marble Cemetery. The Board of Trustees is eager to update our files. If you are able to show a direct line of descent from any of the vault holders, you are entitled to participate in the management of the cemetery and, most particularly, the use of your family vault. Our annual meeting, open only to vault owners, is on the first Monday in May. Please contact the office for more details.

Whether you are interested in becoming more involved in the Cemetery or not, we would be very interested in any information you can offer about family members interred in the Cemetery and, if you desire, would be happy to post this information on our site.

The New York City Marble Cemetery is a small jewel of beauty and peace. Although we have a small endowment, it is not enough to maintain the cemetery as it could be or even should be. While the cemetery is generally closed to the public, entrance may be arranged by special appointment; a donation is requested for this service.

While there is no formal connection between the two cemeteries, you may also wish to visit the web site of the neighboring (and similarly named) New York Marble Cemetery.…

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from The New York Times:

Photo

A plaque honoring the comedian Rodney Dangerfield, a Queens native, being installed in a garden next to the Kew Gardens station on the Long Island Rail Road. Its official unveiling is scheduled for Friday during the opening events of the Kew Gardens Festival of Cinema. Credit Will Glaser/The New York Times

As a boy growing up in Kew Gardens, Queens, Jacob Cohen got no respect.

His many menial jobs included delivering groceries to wealthy neighbors. He

endured anti-Semitism. He played baseball for a shabbily outfitted team against a team from against a team from the more celebrated Forest Hills neighborhood next door, said Carl Ballenas, a local historian.

That disadvantaged boy became Rodney Dangerfield, a stand-up comedian with a self-deprecating style based on his woeful upbringing in Kew Gardens.

Go ahead now, reader, and fidget with your imaginary necktie, mop your beleaguered brow and stammer it, the way Rodney did: No respect, no respect at all, all right?

“The whole ‘no respect’ theme came from his environment,” Mr. Ballenas said. “Kew Gardens was the birthplace, the formation of his themed monologues and catchphrase.”

Eager to confer a measure of respect upon Mr. Dangerfield and upon Kew Gardens, Mr. Ballenas and some of the students at the school where he teaches helped get a memorial plaque made to honor Mr. Dangerfield, who died in 2004 at 82.

Mr. Ballenas watched it being installed last Friday in a small green space next to the Kew Gardens station for the Long Island Rail Road. Mr. Dangerfield lived in the neighborhood with his mother and sister in an apartment above what is now Austin’s Ale House, one of the best-known bars in Queens.

As workers installed the memorial in anticipation of its formal unveiling this Friday, onlookers were eager to recall one-liners from the King of No Respect, often zingers based on uncaring parents, a poor upbringing and other aspects of a troubled life.

The plaque, which bore the comic’s youthful image from his 1939 yearbook from Richmond Hill High School, lists three of his top film appearances: “Caddyshack,” “Easy Money” and “Back to School.”

Also listed are his 1981 Grammy-winning comedy record, “No Respect,” and his 1983 hip-hop single, “Rappin’ Rodney,” which, the plaque noted, reached No. 83 on the Billboard charts.

Mr. Dangerfield was born on Long Island and lived in several New York City neighborhoods before moving with his mother and sister to Kew Gardens in the early 1930s when he was 10. He remained there throughout his teens.

His father abandoned the family and Mr. Dangerfield grew up “unloved and unwanted,” with a mother who withheld affection and kindness, said his widow, Joan Dangerfield.

“His mother convinced him to open a saving account one summer so he could save up for a football uniform,” she said, sounding like a Dangerfield joke setup. “Then she stole his money.”

Ms.…

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