Month :

Sep ,2017

Battle of Prohibition Cocktails. NYC Top Cocktail Mixologists Face Off! Join the Party!

We’re taking over an entire lower east side hot spot Casa Mezcal for this party.

Location

86 Orchard St

Caza Mezcal

New York, NY 10002

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Bring your best 1920s look! Dressing up is encouraged.

Last call to celebrate Summer and it’s your last chance to get in on the most epic summer event in New York City. For one last hurray to summer, we’re highlighting a must see event: a Speakeasy style bartender battle thrown by Postcard, your way to uncover NYC in a new way. It’s New York’s sizzling app that shows you all the hottest venues and events around you, live…

PLEASE NOTE: While it is a free event, and you don’t need to buy any tickets (you do need to rsvp), we are currently closing in on the exciting new version of Postcard app and would value your feedback.

Please note that you do need to have Free Postcard app installed to join in this event. This will be main part of your admission ticket, you will show postcard app on your phone. (you can install the app for free at itunes)

Here are the 2 steps you will need to do before the event:

For Iphone: Install postcard app (it’s free, get it here). Now just RSVP on Eventbrite, and you are ready for the party!

For Android: If you don’t have iphone, bring a friend (who needs to follow step 1) who does and you both get in! (make sure to rsvp either you or your friend)

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Which mixologist will make the better Prohibition cocktail?

Try them both and be the judge.

The Postcard app has been a leading source of all the best nightlife spots since their launch this July, and they’re sending off summer in style. Already the app has been used by top influencers, instagrammers, and even celebrities in NYC. If you haven’t tried it yet, you definitely should.

@tamarazhukova.jpg

“My friends and I like to go where the people are and the app always shows us exactly where to go to have the best night out”

– Tamara Zhukova, NYC Fashion Model (in the photo above)

The Prohibition era was full of fun and revelry, the roaring twenties, flapper girls, post war partying, and of course, secret drinking at speakeasies aka “juice joints”. So it’s not surprising that today’s cocktails get their heaviest influence from this era, and liquors like gin, rye, and scotch have made a comeback in a big way.

This event’s two featured liquors, gin and scotch, have a special Prohibition history behind them.

cocktail-battle.jpg

Both were touted as industrial alcohols. Bootleggers with chemists on staff would strip away the denaturant (the dangerous stuff) in industrial high school lab ethanol, add colors and spices, and label it as premium European scotch or gin. Lucky for us, at this event we get to enjoy the real deal with all the fun, wild, and creative flavors that made these cocktails great!…

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April 2017 marks fifty years since the
Museum received its charter from the New
York State Department of Education Board of
Regents. Over that fifty years the Museum has
grown dramatically, collecting artifacts and
works of art documenting the rise of New York
as a port city.; developing and implementing
innovative and award-winning programming;
mounting exhibitions; and preserving a fleet of
historic ships on the East River. Despite three
massive setbacks: the 9/11 attacks, the Great
Recession of 2008, and the floodwaters of hurri-
cane Sandy, the museum is growing once again.
With support from New York City and a dedi-
cated group of staff, volunteers, members and
friends, the Seaport Museum remains an edu-
cational and cultural gem in lower Manhattan.
The Seaport Museum’s 50th anniversary will
be marked throughout the year with the open-
ing of new exhibitions, including Millions:
Migrants and Millionaires aboard the Great
Liners, 1900-1914 (opening June 2017), artistic
and musical performances, lectures and book
talks, walking tours, and a formal 50th anni-
versary cocktail reception aboard the 1885 ship
Wavertree in September. #

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From The New York Post:

Bronx Community College removes Confederate busts

The busts of two Confederate generals have been swiftly removed from Bronx Community College amid a national conversation about the relics — but the school left the bust of one racist scientist in place, The Post has learned.

In a purge for which various officials took credit, the monuments to Confederate leaders Robert E. Lee and Stonewall Jackson unceremoniously disappeared from an open-air sculpture gallery overnight Thursday.

Bronx Borough President Ruben Diaz Jr. has called the presence of Confederate icons in his borough “especially galling,” leading Gov. Cuomo to say they had to go “because New York stands against racism.”College President Thomas Isekenegbe also pledged to replace the busts with other historical figures that would help create a “space where all people feel respected, welcomed, and valued.”

In their rush to remove Confederates and sanitize the school’s “Hall of Fame for Great Americans,” officials left the bronze bust of the racist, 19th-century scientist Louis Agassiz.

The Swiss-born paleontologist landed a professorship at Harvard following a wildly successful American lecture tour in 1846, and he was ­instrumental in establishing the Ivy League school’s Museum of Comparative Zoology, the first publicly funded science building in North America.

Agassiz was the country’s most famous scientist when he died in 1873, but his reputation eventually suffered because of what the University of California Museum of Paleontology calls “his racist attitudes, which were extreme even for his day.”

“Agassiz could not accept that all groups of humans belonged to the same species, and he argued vehemently for the inferiority of non-white human groups,” according to the museum’s Web site.

The move came amid continuing outrage over the deadly violence that erupted at a rally of white supremacists who gathered in Charlottesville, Va., last Saturday to protest the planned removal of a Lee statue.

“That’s pretty f–ked up. We are all people. We bleed the same color,” said Daniel Roman, 20, who was passing through the college campus Friday evening. “Especially with what’s going on in the South, he can go f- -k himself. I’m all about equality.”

 

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By LUCAS MAUTNER
The Joyce B. Cowin Women’s History Gallery
opened recently with an event to honor Cowin’s
contribution to the New York Historical Society.
Louise Mirrer, President, opened with a few
remarks. “I’m really delighted to see so many
of you at this wonderful celebration…and I am
also delighted to welcome you to the Saving
Washington exhibition,” she said.
The Saving Washington exhibition allows
visitors to look at the early days of the United
States through the eyes of the women of
the period. Books, letters, clothing, and other
important artifacts will be on display to the
public, part of a collection of over 150 objects.
“Saving Washington upends the familiar
narrative of our American founding as a power
struggle among men, offering the story of Dolly
Madison, and women of the early republic
more generally, as an example of how women’s
critical but often behind-the-scenes work gave
rise to the nation’s capital as a beacon for the
world,” Mirrer said.
Cowin, addressing the crowd with audible
emotion and pride, said, “In the end, after seeing
all these exceptional persons of our country—
who propelled us ahead—I strongly believe it is
we the people who try to help each other if we
can. We go forward—we build buildings—cre-
ate schools—support hospitals—we the people
go forward. Each of us will have a major trag-
edy in our lives. We mourn, we remember, and
we go forward. We follow the rules, and some
of us make the rules in the end. But it is we the
people that are the driving force of this great
country; we the people go forward.”
Saving Washington is housed in the new
Joyce B. Cowin Women’s History Gallery, in
the newly renovated fourth floor. Its doors will
open fully to the public in late April, where it
will host several programs, from conferences to
writing workshops to panel discussions. Some
of the upcoming events include an unveiling
of the personal archives of Billie Jean King
and a discussion about “Women and the White
House” moderated by 60 Minutes correspon-
dent Lesley Stahl. #
Joyce B. Cowin, an alumna of Teachers
College, Columbia University, is a philan-
thropist and founder of the Cowin Financial
Literacy Project, which aims to improve finan-
cial literacy among students.…

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Island Historical Tour (North)

Thursday, September 7, 2017

6:00 p.m.7:30 p.m.

This event repeats on the 1st Thursday of every 2 months between 5/4/2017 and 9/7/2017.

Did you know that the Randall’s Island was once three separate land masses? The island has a rich and unique history. Come learn more about the influential people, the bridges, and the landscape changes that transformed the Randall’s Island into the beautiful park it is today!

Location

Randall’s Island Connector in Randall’s Island Park
Manhattan

Directions to this location

Cost

Free

Event Organizer

Randall’s Island

Contact Number

(212) 860-1899

Contact Email

info@randallsisland.org

Categories

Education, Nature, History, Tours, Waterfront

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Date

Sep 6, 2017 • 7:00 PM – 9:00 PM

Cost

FREE and OPEN TO THE PUBLIC!

Location

Gallery at BRIC House

647 Fulton Street
(Enter on Rockwell Place)
Brooklyn, NY 11217

United States
Get Directions

Sergio Purtell, courtesy of the artist and Art 3 Gallery, Brooklyn

JOIN US FOR THE OPENING RECEPTION!

EXHIBITION ON VIEW: September 7 – October 29, 2017

CURATED BY: Elizabeth Ferrer

 

Brooklyn Photographs brings together the work of 11 photographers who have turned their lens on the Brooklyn experience from the late 1960s to the present.  Each of these photographers will present a body of work on a specific theme – childhood in Williamsburg in the 1960s, Halloween in the 1970s, or Bushwick street life in the 1980s, to name a few.  More recent work from the last decade will explore such subjects as the rapidly gentrifying post-industrial landscape, Brooklyn artists, and the microcosm of street life visible near BRIC’s facility at the intersection of Fulton and Flatbush.  In sum, the exhibition will illuminate the important role that photography has had in preserving aspects of Brooklyn’s neighborhoods and traditions, and in documenting the extraordinary cultural and social diversity that is a hallmark of the borough.  It will also reflect the borough as a site of continual change. Neighborhoods transform and new populations emerge, while the essence of Brooklyn’s humanity remains. The exhibition will be accompanied by a catalogue and by public programs.

Photographers include: Yolanda Andrade, Stefanie Apple, Nelson Bakerman, Leigh Davis, Max Kozloff, George Malave, Meryl Meisler, Patrick D. Pagnano, Sergio Purtell, Larry Racioppo, and Russell Frederick .

READ ABOUT THE EXHIBITION IN THE NEW YORK TIMES LENS BLOG >>

Special thanks to Duggal Visual Solutions, Griffin Editions, and Pranayama Art for their services in relation to this exhibition.

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Wed 09 2017 , by

Bygone Newspaper?

NY Daily News Sold To Multi-State Media Conglomerate for $1 and Assumption of Liabilities. Maybe it won’t disappear from newsstands just yet, but it won’t be what it was. One of the comments submitted to the online version of the story summed up the situation which led to it this way: “It was just a matter of time before The Daily News went down; the working class who supported The Daily News has left New York City or has been pushed out.
How is El Dario doing?”

From The NY Times:

Business Day

The Daily News, a Distinctive Voice in New York, Is Sold

“The New York Daily News is a venerable New York City institution,” Eric Gertler, the co-publisher of The News, said in a statement. “We believe that under Tronc’s leadership, The New York Daily News will maintain its tradition of excellence in journalism and continue to be a critical voice for millions of print and online readers.”

Photo

Mortimer B.

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A facebook posting from HB West:

Did you know: In 1968, Twyla Tharp created a dance in the gymnasium of Wagner College? It was called “Generation” and featured a young Sara Rudner and Ms. Tharp herself, among the cast. Lighting by Jennifer Tipton. #StatenIslandDanceHistory #StatenIslandDanceProject #oralhistories

Generation consists of five simultaneous solos, each dancer in her own separate orbit. The dynamic ebbs and wanes as the movement changes tempo and quality; actions build until the dancers are moving so fast or so slow that the integrity of the original phrases disintegrates.
twylatharp.org

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Secret Speakeasy
Prohibition theme!
16mm Short Films, Antiques & Music!
in Soho

Sun Sept 17th
6pm – 10pm All Ages

See 16mm vintage short films
Hear original vinyl records
Enjoy actual prohibition antiques
you can handle and get demonstrated!
Drink and enjoy refreshments!

There will be “nurses” and “doctors” since alcohol is prohibited…unless you have an ailment and require a prescription from the early 1900’s. Choose your ailment
headache, rheumatism, bedwetting or hysteria!

In the spirit of a true Speakeasy
Anything can change so…
Please check this website before leaving.

http://secretspeakeasy.com/

The Museum of Interesting Things
takes over a Soho loft for a special

16mm movie & music fest & party!
Drinks, music & beautiful visuals!
We will bring items from our vast collection of photography / film / prohibition & music items
All eras of history some over 100 years old!
See Old 16mm circus, animations, vaudeville and more

The Museum has a show featuring
Original Rare 16mm short films from the
1940’s, 1950’s and 1960’s
and you get to pick the films allll night!

Early 1900’s and some 1800’s
Stereoviews and Mutoscope cards!

The Loft at Prince Street 177 Prince Street
3rd Floor $10 to help the Museum 🙂
Between Thompson & Sullivan street
in Soho NYC 212 274 8757

This is a loungie place….so please let us know
If you have special needs and require seating.

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