Month :

Oct ,2017

With the New York Adventure Club:

Behind-the-Scenes @ Woodlawn Cemetery & Locked Gilded Age Family Mausoleums

Step inside some of the country’s most opulent family mausoleums that are rarely unlocked for the public, until now.

Join New York Adventure Club for an exclusive, behind-the-scenes experience at Woodlawn Cemetery, one of the largest cemeteries in New York City covering more than 400 acres and serving as the resting place for more than 300,000 people.

Sat. Oct. 21: 3pm-5pm

Woodlawn Conservancy

3800 Jerome Avenue

Bronx, NY 10467

Led by a cemetery docent, our unique experience will include:

 

  • The history and story of Woodlawn Cemetery, and how it became the favored cemetery of so many prominent NYC families from the late 1800s to early 1900s
  • An exploration of the cemetery’s grounds to see some of its most notable mausoleums, sculptures, and landscapes
  • Exclusive access inside some of its most impressive Gilded Age family mausoleums including Harkness, Harbeck, and Dunlop, which contain Tiffany glass, Italian marble, and even a dead parrot

 

Click here to see pictures from one of our last trips to Woodlawn Cemetery!

* Please bring a good pair of walking shoes since we’ll be on our feet for the entirety of the tour!

 


 

Disclaimer

By attending a New York Adventure Club experience, you accept our terms of service.

Categories: Tours, Active, Historic Sites

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From Thought Gallery NYC:
After the city’s Halloween festivities come to an end, New Yorkers will still be able to get a look at the city’s haunted histories at New York: City of the Dead on November 9, which offers an overview of the city’s cemeteries – including the secret ones hidden in some unlikely places.…

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From Thought Gallery NYC:
New Yorkers can get out to Queens this fall for walks exploring Steinway Village (November 18) or Richmond Hill North (November 11), a Victorian village that was one of the first suburban communities. The Municipal Art Society will also offer a tour of the South Bronx and its history and recent revival on November 19.…

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Lower Manhattan is where the Dutch settled, George Washington was inaugurated, and Alexander Hamilton has his final resting place. Learn about the history of the area on a Lower Manhattan History Walk on October 21…  To learn about the area’s seedier underbelly, catch the history of crime in NYC on October 21. A separate walking tour on October 28 will put Wall Street and great financial crashes at the forefront.…

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A few blocks uptown, head to the Lower East Side on October 22 for a look at the Jewish gangsters who once trafficked in the area, including Arnold Rothstein, Meir Lansky and Bugsy Siegel. To the west, New Yorkers can discover the West Village on a walking tour exploring the area’s history, ecology, and architecture on October 17.…

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Brooklyn also has plenty of secrets in store for New Yorkers to discover this fall. Join Untapped Cities for Secret Brooklyn: An Unusual Guide on October 23, which will give attendees the chance to learn from one of the borough’s secret locations, along Newtown Creek. To learn more about one of the borough’s icons, the Brooklyn Dodgers, head to a talk on the legendary baseball team’s legacy on October 17.

Learn about the “Ghost Ship” of Brooklyn, which was stationed off the borough’s coast during the American Revolution, on November 20.…

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Sat, October 14th, 2017 |

11:00 am to 4:00 pm

Free with Museum Admission
Recommended for all ages

On October 14, 1781, Lieutenant Colonel Alexander Hamilton made his famous charge to capture Redoubt Ten in the Battle of Yorktown. Come to the Museum ready with your questions for Hamilton! Portrayed by a Living Historian, Lt. Col. Hamilton tells you how he helped win the climactic campaign of the Revolutionary War. Don’t miss your chance to learn a military drill from the War for Independence under the instruction of Hamilton himself!

We’re celebrating Hamilton’s military career with Living History all weekend. Join us on Sunday to meet the New York City militia that Hamilton joined while he was still in school!


Living History Days at N-YHS
Living History: Hamilton’s Militia, Now Recruiting!
Sunday, October 15th, 2017 | 11:00 am – 4:00 pm

Free with Museum Admission
Recommended for all ages

Immerse yourself in the independent militia company that started Hamilton’s military career! Meet the Hearts of Oak, a troop of Living Historians who portray the group of young volunteers that came together in colonial New-York on the eve of the American Revolution in 1775. Some members of the militia, like Hamilton, were students at King’s College—known today as Columbia University! Take a close look at their distinctive green coats, listen to fife and drum music, and experience a military drill.

We’re celebrating Hamilton’s military career with Living History all weekend. On Saturdaymeet Lieutenant Colonel Alexander Hamilton and learn about his victory at the Battle of Yorktown that happened on this weekend in 1781!

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Thu 10 2017 , by

Bygone Buttered Rolls?

On the face of it, it doesn’t seem like the common coffee-accompanying buttered roll has become bygone from NYC and the surrounding areas of NJ and Connecticut in any measurable way. However, in many cases they aren’t what they used to be, and finding them made properly (with a fresh, handmade Kaiser roll and real salted butter) is becoming a lot more iffy. While buttered rolls can still be bought as such in many small shops, diners, and sidewalk coffee carts throughout the city, the general consensus is that since bygone days (mid-20th century) in the majority of cases the quality of the rolls has gone down due to modern developments such as the disappearance of smaller, regional/local bakeries, leading to the mass production and the lack of freshness and quality of the hard rolls, and lack of knowledge of how they are “supposed” to be has led to rolls without the requisite crispy crust or poppy seeds on top. Then there is the butter, or lack thereof: the more frequent use of margarine of varying taste and mouthfeel by those who sell them, topped off by vendors wrapping them in plastic wrap in deference to modern sanitary sensibilities but giving the rolls the savor of the plastic. The comments section from this NY Times article about the phenomena of buttered Kaiser rolls or “butter rolls” as they are called in popular parlance is revealing: besides having arrived in NYC via “The Vienna Model Bakery” in 1870, which also brought commercial yeasted bread to the city, they derived from German/Austrian Jewish cuisine: one commentator reveals that her father called them “jew rolls” when at home, but not to appear anti-Semitic, ordered “hard rolls” from the local bakery. (In many cases, a local bakery was involved in the production of good old fashioned rolls with butter as they ought to have been-it is the scarcity of general purpose local bakeries that has been partly responsible for the taste and quality of buttered rolls becoming more frequently bygone.) How are the bastardized versions that have become widely available in our time still selling? For the same reason the original and better-tasting ones did: they might be the only thing some people can afford to eat all day. They are cheap and filling, though of dubious nutritional value. —

Ode to the Buttered Roll, That New York Lifeline

It can be hard to explain the appeal of a buttered roll.

Unlike the breakfast sandwich or the cruller, the humble buttered roll makes no claims to lusciousness. It’s not really greater than the sum of its parts: a round roll, sliced and slathered with butter. There is no alchemy involved.

And yet, like many New Yorkers, I’ve breakfasted all my life on buttered rolls, wrapped in plastic, foil or wax paper and sold for about a dollar at any corner deli, bodega or coffee cart.

Do I love them? No. That is not really the point. I love that they exist, an unsung, charmingly ordinary hero of the city’s mornings.…

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1220 Fifth Ave at 103rd St., Open Daily 10am–6pm

Beyond Suffrage: A Century of New York Women in Politics traces women’s political activism in New York City from the struggle to win the vote, through the 20th century, and into our own times. Beginning with the long battle for women’s voting rights that culminated in 1917 statewide and 1920 nationally, the exhibition highlights women at the center of New York’s politics over the course of 100 years. It features a diverse range of activists both familiar and lesser known, the battles they fought, and the many issues they championed.

The exhibition examines how women navigated New York politics in the 1920s through 1940s, often working behind the scenes for causes like health, labor, and good government; the central role of New York in the women’s liberation movement of the 1960s and its redefining of women’s roles in politics and government; and continued campaigns for women’s political power and grassroots mobilizations that demand equal gender rights today.

Beyond Suffrage features rare artifacts, documents, costumes, photographs, and audio-visual materials spanning more than a century that show how women have been politicized—and in turn changed politics—in New York and beyond.

Poster by Rene Lynch. Museum of the City of New York, 2017.27.1b…

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From Jeremiah’s Vanishing New York:

Tuesday, October 10, 2017

The Noho Star & Temple Bar

VANISHING

On Lafayette Street since 1985, The Noho Star still has an old-school vibe that attracts low-key neighborhood people along with New York luminaries like Chuck Close, Wallace Shawn, and Lauren Hutton. The restaurant’s sister spot, Temple Bar, opened in 1989.

Now both are about to vanish.

The owners recently filed a Worker Adjustment and Retraining Notification (WARN) with the New York State Department of Labor, indicating plans to lay off Noho Star’s staff of 54 workers and close the restaurant on December 31.

Under “Reason for Dislocation,” it says “Economic.” The same listing is given for Temple Bar–all 13 employees laid off and the place closed December 31.

Noho Star and Temple Bar were both opened by George Schwarz, a 1930s German-Jewish emigre who began his New York restaurant empire in 1973 with Elephant and Castle in Greenwich Village, followed by One Fifth (since closed). He then acquired and revived the great Keens Chop House when it closed in 1978. From there, he and his artist wife, Kiki Kogelnik, opened Noho Star and Temple Bar. They also bought the building.

Schwarz died not a year ago, in December 2016. His friend Bonnie Jenkins, long-time manager of Keens, is Vice President of the closing restaurants. (Jenkins prefers not to comment on the closures at this time.)

There are no indications that the shutter is coming for Keens or Elephant and Castle.


Eggs Idaho

Only in the past few years did I finally find my way to Noho Star. In a neighborhood of dwindling options, it’s one of the last comfortable places to get a decent meal, i.e., a place that attracts a mixed-age crowd and doesn’t play loud music (or any music) while you eat. It’s a place where a person can dine alone, reading The Times (on paper) or The London Review of Books (as recently witnessed). It’s a place where you can think.

I will miss it.

from The Comments Section:

 

MKB said…

The Noho Star in turn replaced a dusty and old office supply store (where you could still buy V-Mail stationery as late as the Seventies) and NYC’s worst restaurant. That restaurant was so bad junkies and narcs (back in the day when a narc disguise was a serape and a wig) were the main customers. Why was I there? It was also the cheapest and right around the corner from my place on Mott.
I am so very sad that the Noho Star will be no more. Lots of memories.

October 10, 2017 at 4:30 PM

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