Month :

Feb ,2018

First Founding Father: Richard Henry Lee
and the Call to Independence
A lecture presented by Harlow Giles Unger Thursday, February 22
6:30pm

Unger will describe the life and career of Richard Henry Lee, the first Founding Father to call for American Independence from Britain. Learn about how Lee masterminded the political and diplomatic victories that ensured Washington’s military victory.

Fraunces Tavern® Museum, Davis Flag Gallery
(Doors open at 6pm)

Purchase tickets here.
$5 Museum Members
$10 Public Ticket
Includes Museum admission and light refreshments.

Tickets will NOT be shipped in the mail. Your name will be on a check-in list at will-call. You will receive a confirmation email from Fraunces Tavern® Museum with event details within 24 business hours. Please be sure to check your spam folder if you do not receive an email within that time frame.

Seat reservations available for Museum members only, please emaildevelopment@frauncestavernmuseum.org to reserve your seat
or to get more information about becoming a Museum member!

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 *The views of the authors are their own and do not necessarily represent the views of Fraunces Tavern® Museum or Sons of the Revolution℠ in the State of New York, Inc.

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by William M. Hoffman and Anthony Holland

In partnership with Frontline Productions

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Join us for a glimpse into the early history of colonial New York with this stage reading about New York City in 1708 – a time of chaos and political passion.

The Dutch are still seething from the British takeover, and Lord Cornbury, considered a buffoon in
British circles, is sent to the colonies by his cousin, Queen Anne, to be Governor of New York and New Jersey. He has no interest in government and at his first public appearance he wears a dress; which causes controversy to ensue.

 …

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DATE AND TIME

Mon, February 12, 2018

6:30 PM – 8:00 PM EST

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LOCATION

Institute Of Culinary Education

225 Liberty Street

3rd Floor

New York, NY 10281

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DESCRIPTION

New York City has been a hub of chocolate manufacturing for centuries. In the mid-1700s, small, independent producers ground cocoa beans for local neighborhoods; later, chocolate was produced in mills that also turned out flour, mustard, oils, and paints; and in the nineteenth century, chocolate manufacturers clustered in lower Manhattan, creating a golden age of chocolate production in New York. But as smaller firms were absorbed by larger ones, and as manufacturing of all kinds left Manhattan, chocolate manufacturing disappeared, only to return decades later with the recent rise of small-batch craft producers. Michael Laiskonis will discuss how chocolate making in New York came full circle.

A chocolate tasting will precede the talk.

Michael Laiskonis was Executive Pastry Chef at Le Bernardin restaurant for eight years. He teaches and mentors future chefs, writes about food, and consults for major food industry companies. Michael Laiskonis launched the bean-to-bar Chocolate Lab at ICE in 2015.

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When: Saturday, February 10, 12:00pm – 1:00pm
Price: Free with Museum admission

As part of the Black Gotham Experience day at the Museum, a panel of experts will discuss early Black communities in New York City.

Dating back to the 1600’s, before New York was New York, free and enslaved residents of African descent were integral contributors to the growing metropolis. As we take a look back at early Black communities such as New Amsterdam, Weeksville, and Seneca Village in the 17th through 19th century, join a lively conversation with Dr. Prathibha Kanakamedala, curator of In Pursuit of Freedom, Kamau Ware, Founder of the Black Gotham Experience, and professor Dr. Deborah Gray White to make connections between these legacies through today. Moderator Sarah Seidman will guide a conversation to unpack the the daily lives, means of organization, and early efforts for Black liberation.

This panel is part of a larger program, which includes a performance by The American Slavery Project at 11:00 am. Learn more.


 

About the Moderator:

Dr. Sarah Seidman is the Puffin Foundation Curator of Social Activism at the Museum of the City of New York. She curates the ongoing exhibition Activist New York, and has also curated Beyond Suffrage and King in New York at the Museum. She holds a Ph.D. in American Studies and an M.A. in Public Humanities from Brown University and a B.A. in American Studies from Wesleyan University. Her research centers around questions of political culture, race, and social movements in the United States and the world. She has received fellowships from the University of Rochester, New York University, and the American Council of Learned Societies, and her writing has appeared in the Journal of Transnational American Studies and The Sixties: A Journal of History, Politics and Culture, among other places.

About the Panelists:

Dr. Prithi Kanakamedala specializes in the Black Atlantic during the long  nineteenth century. Her more recent scholarship examines New York’s free black communities. She has published on a number of topics including black identity in nineteenth century transatlantic performance culture, New York’s cultural heritage, and the labor history of the Brooklyn Bridge. Dr. Kanakamedala is a committed public historian and served as both historian and curator for In Pursuit of Freedom (www.pursuitoffreedom.org), a partnership of Brooklyn Historical Society, Weeksville Heritage Center, and Irondale Ensemble Project. The project traced Brooklyn’s anti-slavery movement. She continues to work with a number of non-profits including City Lore/ Place Matters and the Brooklyn Historical Society. She received her PhD in Atlantic Studies from the University of Sussex, England and is originally from Liverpool, England.

Kamau Ware (b. 1974) is a Brooklyn-based visual artist born in Pittsburgh, PA. His work focuses on visual storytelling by using photography, history, and fantasy to produce moving narratives about people and spaces. His works include America: The Legacy of African American Legacy, Arsenal Gallery, New York, NY (2016); #INSIDEBLACKGOTHAM, Civil Service Cafe, Brooklyn, NY (2015); Exposed, Sweet Lorraine Gallery, Brooklyn, NY (2014); and Bed Stuy Story, Warehouse Gallery, Brooklyn, NY (2014).

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From The New York Times:

A shabbily dressed man walked into an opulent restaurant. It was the 1970s, when people still made a sartorial effort for a night out in Manhattan. Alone, he took a seat in the lounge.

The restaurant’s owner, Laura Maioglio, wasn’t wearing her glasses, so her vision was blurry. She didn’t think much of the visitor. But her widowed mother, Piera Maioglio, who was with her, did. “Oh, that poor person, he doesn’t look like he can afford Barbetta,” Piera told her daughter.

Together they observed the man from their usual table in the back of the 100-seat dining room, lit by a majestic chandelier built in 1775, acquired from a palazzo in Turin, Italy.

A Barbetta menu from that era, at the New York Public Library in the Manuscripts, Archives, and Rare Book Division, lists roast rack of lamb for two for $14.50. There was an additional 75-cent cover charge. Back then, it would have cost at least $20 a head for dinner with wine, plus an extra $2 to $3 for shavings of white truffle flown in from Piedmont, in Northern Italy. Dinner would easily cost about $150 for two today.

Piera, who was extremely beautiful, Laura recalled — “a cross between Marlene Dietrich and Greta Garbo” — instructed a waiter to bring the man a menu to alert him what he was in for. Once he saw the prices, she thought, he could make a face-saving excuse to leave and not have to skulk out after being seated in the dining room.

The Maioglio women had been watching over the theater district Italian restaurant, at 321 West 46th Street, since 1962. That was the year Piera’s husband and Barbetta’s founder, Sebastiano Maioglio, died at the age of 82. Laura was their only child.

The man didn’t budge after glancing at the menu, contending that he was waiting for three friends.

Laura went to take a closer look. It was Mick Jagger.

“Who’s Mick Jagger?” Piera asked.

“He’s with the Rolling Stones,” Laura said.

“Who are the Rolling Stones?” asked Piera.

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Photo

The Rolling Stones and Andy Warhol were regulars at Barbetta in the ’70s. More recently, the Clintons and Lin-Manuel Miranda have stopped by. Credit Dina Litovsky for The New York Times

These days at Barbetta, most guests dress casually. On a recent evening, Rick Miramontez, the press agent for “Hello, Dolly!” and “Springsteen on Broadway,” sat tie-less in the lounge, something he would not have dared to do when he visited for the first time in 1979. “It was very dressy, very starched, a necktie place through the ’80s, no question,” he said.

Indeed, from its townhouse exterior to its brocade chairs and swag curtains, Barbetta is a throwback to the days of the fancy restaurant.

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From Fraunces Tavern Museum:

Valentine’s Day Tour: Love in the Time of Revolution

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Treat your special someone a unique gift this Valentine’s Day with Love in the Time of Revolution, a special tour that explores romantic tales of the Founding Fathers and their Lady Loves! Learn about 18th century courting and marriage customs and delve into the intimate relationships that were so poetically penned in love letters during the Revolutionary War.

This guided tour is included with the purchase of regular Museum admission.

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Sat 02 2018 , by

Valuable Tour

From The Fraunces Tavern Museum:

Valuable Tour

A 45-minute tour of the special exhibition Valuable plus a docent facilitated group discussion. This tour will give you a chance to see Fraunces Tavern Museum as you’ve never seen it before and to dive deep into some of the most valuable pieces within Fraunces Tavern Museum’s collection and asks the question: what makes them so valuable? How have these artifacts shaped the history of our culture today? From Martha Washington’s slipper to Von Steuben’s camp liquor chest, each of these objects tells us something about early American culture and beyond.

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We offer guided Museum Tours to the public FREE with admission on the following days and times:

Thursdays @ 2pm
Fridays @ 2pm
Saturdays @ 1pm & 2pm

Sundays @ 1pm & 2pm

Saturdays in February @ 3pm – Fighting for Freedom Tour

There are NO guided tours on the following dates and times:

Sunday, February 11 @ 1pm
Sunday, February 18 @ 2pm
Saturday, February 24 @ 2pm

*No reservations are required. Please plan your arrival accordingly, as space is limited.

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from The Fraunces Tavern Museum website:

A 45-minute guided tour about Revolutionary spies such as Nathan Hale, Benjamin Tallmadge, and Lydia Darrah. Learn about the tools of the trade as a spymaster, the creation of America’s very first spy ring, and catch a glimpse of the last known letter from Nathan Hale which hasn’t been on display in over decade!

We offer guided Museum Tours to the public FREE with admission on the following days and times:

Thursdays @ 2pm
Fridays @ 2pm
Saturdays @ 1pm & 2pm

Sundays @ 1pm & 2pm

Saturdays in February @ 3pm – Fighting for Freedom Tour

There are NO guided tours on the following dates and times:

Sunday, February 11 @ 1pm
Sunday, February 18 @ 2pm
Saturday, February 24 @ 2pm

*No reservations are required. Please plan your arrival accordingly, as space is limited.

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From The Fraunces Tavern Museum:

Coming in February 2018:
NEW!
 Fighting for Freedom Tour

In honor of Black History Month, this tour
is FREE with regular admission every Saturday at 3:00pm from February 3-24!

From battles to espionage, and harrowing tales of escape, this tour emphasizes the fact that African Americans, both enslaved and free, were present, active, and of critical importance in the American Revolution. This tour highlights the incredible achievements and contributions of Ona Judge, James Armistead Lafayette, and Elizabeth Freeman in the American Revolution, and how their participation resulted in the eventual abolishment of the historic institution of slavery in America. This tour will also explore George Washington’s changing relationship with the practice of slavery both privately and politically.

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You can also reserve a private group tour below at any time or date starting February 1.

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