Author :

Laura

Mod New York New York Fashion Takes A Trip

From Rizzoli Books: https://www.rizzolibookstore.com/news/mod-new-york-1

Conversation, reception, and book-signing, with Phyllis Madgidson, Donald Albrect, and Caroline Reynnolds Milbank

According to the skint e-mail newsletter, attending while dressed in the Mod style of Twiggy is encouraged, but not required.

Store Location and Hours

 

    • 1133 Broadway
      between 25th and 26th Street
      New York, NY 10010
      (map)
    • (800) 52-BOOKS – Toll Free
      (212) 759-2424 – Telephone
    • Monday–Friday: 10:30–8:00
      Saturday: 12:00-8:00
      Sunday: 11:00–7:00

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from Lost City:

04 September 2012

Lascoff Drugs Closes After a 113 Years

I thought upper Lexington Avenue had a special force field surrounding it (i.e.—influential rich people) that allowed an inordinate number of old businesses to survive. But, alas, I was wrong. If the bluebloods couldn’t save the iconic Upper East Side pharmacy Lascoff Drugs, what can they save?
Lascoff closed last July after 113 years in business. I don’t know how I missed that. I guess lately I’ve unconsciously learned to avert my eyes when beautiful landmarks shutter. I just can’t bear the pain.
Lascoff, along with Bigelow and one or two others, was one of New York’s great, classic pharmacies. It opened in 1899, when McKinley was President, and was the first licensed pharmacy in New York State, according to the New York Times. It was a store so majestic and solemn, you felt like you were entering a church when you went in. High ceilings, high shelving, a balcony, ancient Pharmacuetical relics, and silence. No music. You could find many old and classic brands there that you couldn’t locate elsewhere. And the vertical sign on the corner building was one of the grandest in the city.
The enterprise was founded by J. Leon Lascoff. He was born in Vilna, then in Russian Poland, and came to New York in 1892. His first drug store was at Lex and 83rd. He then moved across the street and then, in 1931, moved to 82nd and Lex—Lascoff’s final location. He died in 1936. His son Frederick took over the business and ran it until his death in 1970. During Fred’s time, the store had a reputation for odd cures. It sold leeches to boxers and catnip oil to lion hunters. He once sold a mixture of phenol, valerian, asafetida and iodoform to a colleague who had complained that his own pharmacy didn’t smell enough like a drug store.
After Frederick died, the business fell out of the family. It was purchased by Phil and Susan Ragusa. I assume they were still running it when it closed.

2 comments:

upstate johnny g said…

Aaarrrgggghhhhhh!!!!!!!! Another icon, another living link to the past, another glorious example of how time travel is almost possible, is closed. My girlfriend and I popped by Lascoff one morning this past summer and even though it was a weekday, they were closed. We didn’t quite get it, because we’d been there before and business seemed healthy enough. Brooks, we have you to thank for turning us on to Lascoff’s in the first place with your great posting about that neighborhood. We would go to Lascoff’s and then pop over to the Lexington Candy Shop to have a real burger and a Coke made with actual Coke syrup and carbonated water, mixed with a spoon by the fountain guy. Your Yorkville guide opened all of this up to us. Thanks.

Do you have any idea what will become of Lascoff’s?

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From Walter Grutchfield.net:

FThe J. M. Horton Ice Cream Company
back  The J. M. Horton Ice Cream Company, 302 Columbus Ave. New York, 2009   next
The J. M. Horton
Ice Cream Company
In 1860 James M. Horton was listed in Trow’s New York City Directory as an agent for the Orange County Milk Association.

In the 1861 New York city directory this ad for the Orange County Milk Association listed James M. Horton as president of the company. It also says that the company was organized in 1842 and incorporated 1 May 1860.

By 1873 James M. Horton was listed at 305 Fourth Ave., 1264 Broadway and 77 Chatham St., New York City. These, apparently, were the earliest locations of the J. M. Horton Ice Cream Co.

305 Fourth Ave.and 1264 Broadway are on this Horton’s Ice Cream ad from 1877.

305 Fourth Ave. and 75 Chatham St. are also on this Horton’s Ice Cream ad from 1879. 305 Fourth Ave. remained a Horton address from 1873 through 1914.

302 Columbus Ave. first appeared in directories in 1892 and remained a Horton location through 1922.

An F.Y.I. article in the New York Times, 19 March 2000, by Daniel B. Schneider, had this to say regarding 302 Columbus Ave., “At the turn of the 19th century, when the building at 302 Columbus was erected, the Horton company was supplying over half of New York City’s ice cream, but like other small local producers it was ultimately unable to compete with larger, more mechanized operations and by 1930 was absorbed by the Pioneer Ice Cream Division of Borden. Most building construction on Columbus Avenue followed the arrival of the Ninth Avenue el in 1881, and the fancy pediments on many former factory buildings were originally intended as rooftop advertisements, to be seen by riders on the trains passing overhead but all but invisible from the sidewalk below.”

The founder of the J. M. Horton Ice Cream Company was James Madison Horton (1835-1914). His obituary in the New York Times, 27 June 1914, read, “James Madison Horton, the well-known ice cream manufacturer, died yesterday at his home, 112 West 126th Street, at the age of 79. Mr. Horton was born on a farm near Middletown, N. Y., and in 1853 came to this city with his brother to engage in the milk business. From 1858 to 1869 he was President of the Orange County Milk Association and in 1870 first started in the ice cream business. He bought out a small business and reorganized it under the name of J. M. Horton & Co. In 1873 the firm was again reorganized, this time becoming the J. M. Horton Ice Cream Company, with a nominal capital of $40,000, and Mr. Horton became its President and chief stockholder. From this later start the business grew until today there are six stores and distributing centres in this city and several in Brooklyn. Mr. Horton was largely interested in real estate. In 1912 he transferred eleven pieces of property to his children, James M.…

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From The New York Times:

A Glasses Menagerie

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Tea parlors were the battleground in a war against fortune telling.

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$69 Tix To A Great Gatsby NYE: 4 Hr Premium Open Bar & Food ($95 Value)
$69Buy Now
$95
27%
1 day
value
savings
remaining
DETAILS

Usher in 2018 with luscious libations and bygone opulence at The Daisy, a gorgeous, Art Deco-inspired haunt on the Upper East Side. Come through to The Great Gatsby New Year’s Eve starting at 9:00pm on Sunday December 31, 2017.

Grab your $69 Ticket (a $95 value) to celebrate the New Year with a fantastic 4 Hour Premium Open Bar from 9:00pm until 1:00am. You’ll get 2018 off the ground with endless rounds of farm-to-bar specialty cocktails by Beverage Director Nate Fishman.

May we suggest the Ripple My Bitcoin (Michter’s whiskey, orange liqueur, lime, cynar, ginger beer), or the American Beauty (Farmer’s organic gin, white tea-infused rosewater, lemon, prosecco) – two appealing cocktails, fit for the grandeur of the night.

Let’s definitely not forget about exquisite hors d’oeuvres courtesy of Executive Chef Juan Meza, formerly of 2 Michelin-starred Aquavit. Think: Slab Bacon Sliders, Mushroom Soup Shooters, and the Seafood Platter featuring little neck clams, octopus, prawns, and oysters graced with Champagne mignonette & tapioca pearls…

Come into this halcyon dream and soak up the vintage decadence. It will be a night that Gatsby himself would envy…

LOCATION
The Daisy
1641 2nd Avenue
(646) 964-5756
MERCHANT

Created by the team behind Agave in the West Village, The Daisy is a widely acclaimed, seasonally-driven restaurant, bar & lounge that balances effortless elegance with subtle splendor.

The gorgeously textured space with its washes of tonal grays, watercolor walls, and white marble tables with rounded corners transitions seamlessly from leisurely suppers to all-night excess.

Infuse this New Year’s Eve with chic panache at this Prohibition extravaganza. Revel in sweet sophistication as you imbibe, mingle, whisper, and laugh the night away.

When the clock strikes midnight, bottles will pop and Champagne will overflow, but rest assured your night is just getting started. Time is on your side…

Your $69 Ticket (a $95 Value) Includes:

  • Admission to A Great Gatsby NYE from 9:00pm until 4:00am on Sunday December 31, 2017.
  • 4 Hour Premium Open Bar from 9:00pm until 1:00am, including a selection of The Daisy’s Signature Cocktails, such as the Crazy in Love (vodka, grapefruit, lime, beet-elderflower) and the Hypnotize (Santera Tequila Bianco, blood orange, lejay cassis).
  • Delectable Hors D’Oeuvres such as Slab Bacon Sliders, Mushroom Soup Shooters, and the Seafood Platter.
  • Live Screening of the Ball Drop.
  • Champagne Toast at Midnight.
  • Live DJ Sets.

The Daisy’s Website | A Great Gatsby NYE

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From pulsd.com:
DETAILS

Ring in the new year at Mr. Cannon, the most infamous bar in the Seaport District, offering inventive cocktails and speakeasy vibes. The fun starts at 9:00pm on Sunday December 31, 2017.

Grab this $89 Ticket (a $118 value) and get ready to enjoy throwback cocktails from years gone by as you wrap-up 2017.

Your 3 Hour Premium Open Bar also includes passed foods; from the Baby Lamb Chops with Spearmint Jam and Tzatziki Sauce to the Vegetable Spring Rolls with Ponzu Sauce, you certainly won’t be going hungry as you are getting merry.

Whether you come for the cozy vibes or the sleep cocktails, counting down to midnight at such an exclusive spot means that you’ll be welcoming 2018 in an only-in-New York fashion…

LOCATION
Mr. Cannon
206 Front Street
MERCHANT

Nestled in downtown Manhattan’s Seaport District, right off the city’s idyllic cobblestone streets, Mr. Cannon is a speakeasy that traces it’s roots back to 1817.

Enter through the hidden entrance and you’ll be transported to a subterranean lounge from years gone by. This bespoke social club unites the present and past with old-school sensibilities and aesthetics.

Celebrate the turn of the year at this intimate venue with endless drinks and delicious food including the Peppercorn Encrusted Beef Tenderloin with Horseradish Crema & Micro Arugula and Citrus Marinated Shrimp with Dill and Mango.

Have a few more drinks and it may loosen your lips; but until then, you’ll be welcoming 2018 from New York City’s best kept secret…

Your $89 Ticket (an $118 Value) Includes:

  • Admission to the A Speakeasy New Year’s Eve Party at Mr. Cannon from 9:00pm until 2:00am on Sunday December 31, 2017.
  • 3 Hour Open Bar from 9:00pm until 12:00am.
  • Passed foods including Baby Lamb Chops with Spearmint Jam & Tzatziki Sauce, Vegetable Spring Rolls with Ponzu Sauce & more.
  • Countdown to the Ball Drop.
  • Midnight Champagne Toast.
  • Party Favors.

Mr Cannon’s Website | A Speakeasy NYE

THE FINE PRINT
  • May purchase as many tickets as you like for personal use or for gifting.
  • Event runs 9pm-2am; Premium Open Bar run from 9pm-12am.
  • Valid only on Sunday December 31, 2017.

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At Footlight Bar:

Too much of anything is bad.
Too much champagne is just right.

Come in your vintage finest and kick off 2017 like prohibition just ended! Who knows? Maybe the apocalpse really is upon us, the Cubs did just win the world series….

Suits/ties/flapper dresses and other roaring 20’s themed attire encouraged but not necessary! All that glitters is not gold, but the Footlight will be full of glitter and gold all night! Live JAZZ in the back room at 8PM DANCING IS NOW ENCOURAGED.

NO COVER, FREE champagne toast at midnight!

 

  • The Footlight, 465 Seneca Ave, Ridgewood, NY, 11385(718) 673-8211footlightbar@gmail.com

 

 …

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Vacant storefronts are becoming more noticeable in the capital of consumption, as small retailers are being pushed out by wealthy investors

Vacant retail space in the New York neighborhood of Chelsea. Thousands of small retailers have been replaced by national chains.
Vacant retail space in the New York neighborhood of Chelsea. Thousands of small retailers have been replaced by national chains. Photograph: Richard Levine/Corbis via Getty Images

Walk down almost any major New York street – say Fifth Avenue near Trump Tower, or Madison Avenue from midtown to the Upper East Side. Perhaps venture down Canal Street, or into the West Village around Bleecker, and some of the most expensive retail areas in the world are blitzed with vacant storefronts.

The famed Lincoln Plaza Cinemas on the Upper West Side announced earlier this week that it is closing next month. A blow to the city’s cinephiles, certainly, but also a sign of the effects that rapid gentrification, coupled with technological innovation, are having on the city.

Over the past several years, thousands of small retailers have closed, replaced by national chains. When they, too, fail, the stores lie vacant, and landlords, often institutional investors, are unwilling to drop rents.

A recent survey by New York councilmember Helen Rosenthal found 12% of stores on one stretch of the Upper West Side is unoccupied and ‘for lease’. The picture is repeated nationally. In October, the US surpassed the previous record for store closings, set after the 2008 financial crisis.

The common refrain is that the devastation is the product of a profound shift in consumption to online, with Amazon frequently identified as the leading culprit. But this is maybe an over-simplification.

“It’s not Amazon, it’s rent,” says Jeremiah Moss, author of the website and book Vanishing New York. “Over the decades, small businesses weathered the New York of the 70s with it near-bankruptcy and high crime. Businesses could survive the internet, but they need a reasonable rent to do that.”

Part of the problem is the changing make-up of New York landlords. Many are no longer mom-and-pop operations, but institutional investors and hedge funds that are unwilling to drop rents to match retail conditions. “They are running small businesses out of the city and replacing them with chain stores and temporary luxury businesses,” says Moss.

In addition, he says, banks will devalue a property if it’s occupied by a small business, and increase it for a chain store. “There’s benefit to waiting for chain stores. If you are a hedge fund manager running a portfolio you leave it empty and take a write-off.”

New York is famously a city of what author EB White called “tiny neighborhood units” is his classic 1949 essay Here is New York. White observed “that many a New Yorker spends a lifetime within the confines of an area smaller than a country village”.

In Vanishing New York, Moss writes of the toll the evisceration of distinct neighborhoods through real estate over-pricing has on the city.

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19th Century Parlorcraft Circle: Paper Flowers, Cookie Swap,
and Yuletide Social

Saturday, December 23, 2017
2:30 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.
Jefferson Market Library
Third Floor
425 Avenue of the Americas
New York, NY 10011

Join the New York Nineteenth Century Society Parlorcraft Circle as we explore the art and craft of paper flowers. The history of artificial flowers dates back many thousands of years; they are mentioned in the Old Testament. Among the poor of the 19th century, constructing paper flowers was a common means of earning money. Entire families would make paper flowers to sell on the street. The 1891 census reported 4,011 flower-makers in London. It was also a genteel activity for more affluent ladies. Many period magazines and journals include instruction and templates for flower-making. Artificial flowers were used to trim ladies’ hats, gowns, corsages, and accessories, and paper flowers were used for festive decorations and commemorations such as Remembrance Day.

We’ll provide materials and instruction to make seasonal paper poinsettias, holly, Christmas roses, and other blooms. If time permits, we’ll even show you how to assemble them into garlands and wreaths.

In addition to our amazing paper flower tutorials, it’s also time for our annual NYNCS Cookie Swap and Yuletide Social! Non-crafters are welcome to attend this event. Please bring one dozen homemade cookies if you would like to participate in the swap. No cookies, no problem! We always have extra. Stop by to say hello and enjoy seasonal treats, hot chocolate, spiced cider, and/or other surprise comestibles!

No need to RSVP; just bring yourselves and if you wish, one dozen cookies to swap! All who bring cookies will go home with an assortment of leftovers.

If you have a special craft or skill from history that you would like to share, please let us know: letters@nyncs.org

Please leave your laptops and modern sewing/craft projects at home for this event – we’re all about the historic hand work!

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