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Food and Drink

From Bowery Boogie:

Breaking: ‘Cup & Saucer’ Ending Service on Monday After Decades on Canal Street

Posted on: July 12th, 2017 at 12:39 pm by

Say goodbye to that classic 1940s Coca-Cola sign at the corner of Eldridge and Canal Streets. Word on the block is that the fabled luncheonette, Cup & Saucer, is hanging it up. It’s closing shop after decades serving the neighborhood, thanks to a steep rent hike.

And there’s no time for you to process this information, either, as the last day of business is Monday.

Every few years, rumors surface detailing a demise that was continuously eluded. Especially after the building reportedly sold several years ago, creating much uncertainty whether the business would actually survive. Co-owner John Vasilopoulos told Metro in 2015 that he hoped the new owner would maintain the 5-year lease arrangement of the predecessor to keep afloat. Then there was the recent upstairs fire back in January, which no doubt threatened the operation. This time, however, it appears the talk is true. A tipster who frequents the establishment daily was informed by staff of the closure. Apparently, they started telling all the regular customers today.

We don’t really know what to say. The Cup & Saucer is a no-frills Lower East Side treasure that serves all strata of the community. “Giving the people of New York quality food, fast delivery, and great customer service,” as its website prominently touts. On any given morning, you find construction workers, commuters, travelers, and locals mingling at the countertop.

It’s been under the same ownership for nearly thirty years. Partners Nick Castanos (also a cook) and John Vasilopoulos took over the business in 1988, yet local lore suggests the corner kitchen dates back some 77 years. The duo also owns a diner in Ridgewood, Queens.

Our tipster surmises that the luncheonette also fell victim to the effects of failed development (i.e. the Canal Tower) and the encroaching Chinatown Bus situation that’s multiplying along Canal Street between Forsyth and Allen.


Visual Documentation of the distinguishing interior features of the now-bygone The Cup & Saucer Luncheonette (from Untapped Cities.com)

Iconic NYC Diner “The Cup & Saucer” Closing Down After Nearly 70 Years

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The Grand Neptune Ball

Open Bar. Live Band. High Seas. (A Fundraiser.)

A celebration on the historic Waterfront Museum Barge –  a boat and nonprofit that is raising funds for renewed arts and education programs after our Superstorm Sandy refit.

Join us for free local fare and spirits! And for the midsummer sunset! Come to dance to live jazz! Come as your most extravagant self! Come support arts and education aboard the historic barge!! Cocktail attire, and any a nod to the maritime 1920s, is encouraged. Music by Steve Oates and the Zac Greenberg Quartet.

The Waterfront Barge
July 22, 2017 at 8-11pm
290 Conover St. Brooklyn, NY
Tickets $50 – $100 (Tax-deductible)

Tickets can be purchased here and at the door.

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From silive.com:

Schaffer’s Tavern: Winky says ‘it’s time’ for last call; sets closing date

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JUN24

Victorian Picnic – June 24, 2017 (RAIN DATE: JULY 8)

Public

  • Saturday, June 24 at 1:00 PM5:00 PM EDT
    Starts in about 6 hours · 23° Heavy Rain
  • pin

    Central Park

    5 Av To Central Park W, 59 St To 110 St, Manhattan, New York 10022Saturday, June 24, 2017
    1:00 p.m.
    meet at 103rd Street and Central Park West
    RAIN DATE:
    Saturday, July 8IF IT RAINS, WE WILL ANNOUNCE RESCHEDULING PLANS BY 10:30 AM

    As the sunny days grow longer, one often desires a happy excursion to whittle away the hours with friends. What better way to do so than with a Victorian picnic? Join the New York 19th Century Society for an afternoon of dining al fresco, good conversation, reading aloud, lawn games of the gentler sort, and photography.

    Bring food or drink to share. Suggested attire (not required): summer whites, garden party frocks, tea dress, steampunk, Goth, or Lolita.

    We will gather at 103rd Street and Central Park West. Once everyone is assembled, we’ll find a quiet meadow in the North Woods nearby to spread our blankets and enjoy food and drink.

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Jazz Age Lawn Party: June 10-11 & August 26 -27 2017

“I can’t think of a more delightful way to spend a weekend in the city“

-Bill Cunningham, The New York Times 2014

The Jazz Age Lawn Party is New York City’s original prohibition era inspired gathering. Hosted and conceived by Michael Arenella, the event started as a small gathering of perhaps fifty friends and fans. The event, initially produced by the island, was handed over to Michael in its third year to organize and grow. Under his watch, the event was carefully crafted and nurtured, becoming what is now referred to by The Wall Street Journal as, “the biggest (not to mention the cleanest and most family-oriented) regular event in the ‘Retro Noveau’ movement…” It was at this time that St-Germain joined forces with The Lawn Party, delightfully whetting the whistles of fops and flappers with their refreshing summer cocktails.

Selected by The New York Times as one of the most memorable events of 2011 and 2012, The Jazz Age Lawn Party offers a magical opportunity to travel back in time. Two weekends a year, guests are invited to discover and experience one of the most colorful and formative epochs in American history.…

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In the history of the hot dog and its Coney Island connection, Feltman’s preceded Nathan’s, and in a surprise turn of events, modern-day entrepreneurs have revived the brand after 63 years of dormancy, brought back a restaurant location to Surf Avenue (not sure if it is on or just near the original location), and have recreated a type of hot dog similar to what was served by Feltman’s back in the day.

From The Coney Island Blog:

…Feltman’s of Coney Island officially returns to it’s original location after 63 years by giving away 150 free hot dogs!  150 represents the years since German immigrant Charles Feltman invented the hot dog at Coney Island, NY.

A press conference will be taking place outside Luna Park at 11:45am. At 12pm the first 150 people on line will receive one free original hot dog courtesy of Feltman’s of Coney Island. By Memorial Day the Surf Ave location will be adorned with new signage inside and out. The new Surf Ave. location will be operating during the same hours as Luna Park. Valerio Ferrari President of C.A.I. and Luna Park says” we are thrilled to bring a part of Coney Island history to Luna Park as it’s the perfect fit.”

In 1867 Charles Feltman invented the hot dog at Coney Island. By the 1870’s Feltman’s Oceanside Pavilion was the largest restaurant in the world! In 1915 Nathan Handwerker was a bun slicer at Feltman’s Restaurant before opening his own hot dog spot down the block selling a tasty but smaller knockoff of Feltman’s original at half the price. Now you have the opportunity to enjoy the mother of all hot dogs! The original! Feltman’s of Coney Island hot dogs are all natural with an “Old World” German spice blend and no nitrates added in lamb casing. They have an incredible snap!

 

 

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Hot Dog inventor Charles Feltman

Feltman’s has a location at 80 St. Mark’s Place in the East Village. Feltman’s hot dogs are sold in Brooklyn at Brenman’s Meat Market and the Beach Deli both on Gerritsen Ave. In Queens at Deirdre Maeve’s Market in Breezy Point. Feltman’s hot dogs may be shipped across the country via the online store FeltmansofConeyIsland.com.

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@NY Post

Just last week Feltman’s hot dogs were added to the menu at Mc Sorley’s Old Ale House in Manhattan. The first time the historic tavern has altered the menu in over 50 years! Mikey’s Burgers on Ludlow St. on the Lower East Side also carries the iconic franks.

Feltman’s biggest fan is most likely eating Champ Kobayashi who can occasionally be found at Feltman’s Kitchen (East Village) at 80 St. Mark’s Place in the East Village scarfing down a Feltman’s original or an Al Capone Hot Dog named after the famous mobster who would frequently fill his belly at Feltman’s. Kobayashi said eating Feltman’s hot dogs is “as good as eating steak!”

So come celebrate Feltman’s long awaited return with a free hot dog as well as the 90th anniversary of the Cyclone Rollercoaster on Memorial Day.

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From Untapped Cities:

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From Curbed:

Harlem’s legendary Lenox Lounge is being demolished

The site is rumored to give way to a massive Sephora

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-Event Passed-

from CityLimits.org:

April 29 @ 11:00 am5:00 pm

South Street Seaport Museum celebrates its 50th Anniversary

The South Street Seaport Museum, situated in the original port that built New York into the city it is today, will celebrate fifty years this year! The Seaport Museum invites the city to join in the celebration of this important milestone, which will be recognized over an entire year (April 2017-April 2018) of special programming and exhibitions. …

April 2017 marks fifty years since the Museum received its charter from the New York State Department of Education Board of Regents. Over that fifty years the Museum has grown dramatically, collecting artifacts and works of art documenting the rise of New York as a port city.; developing and implementing innovative and award-winning programming; mounting exhibitions; and preserving a fleet of historic ships on the East River. Despite three massive setbacks: the 9/11 attacks, the Great Recession of 2008, and the floodwaters of hurricane Sandy, the museum is growing once again. With support from New York City and a dedicated group of staff, volunteers, members and friends, the Seaport Museum remains an educational and cultural gem in lower Manhattan.

The Seaport Museum’s 50th anniversary will be marked throughout the year with the opening of new exhibitions, including Millions: Migrants and Millionaires aboard the Great Liners, 1900-1914 (opening June 2017), artistic and musical performances, lectures and book talks, walking tours, and a formal 50th anniversary cocktail reception aboard the 1885 ship Wavertree in September.

Capt. Jonathan Boulware, Executive Director of the Museum, spoke enthusiastically about the anniversary. “It’s a great privilege to celebrate the five-decade life of this vital institution. We’re here in the original fabric of old New York, the ships, the piers, the 19th-century buildings. It’s the history of New York, but the topics we cover are still highly relevant today. The original values that made New York what it is, the Dutch values of trade and tolerance, the New York values of immigration, of multiculturalism, and of ambition, these all touch on urgent issues of New York and America today. Indeed, as we celebrate this important anniversary, we’re also celebrating the very best of New York values, past, present, and future.”

A brief history of the Seaport Museum:
The Museum proper is housed several buildings known collectively as Schermerhorn Row, but when completed in 1812, Schermerhorn Row was, in many respects, the city’s first world trade center. The Row housed a series of counting houses where merchants bought and sold coffee, tea, cotton, molasses, and countless other trade goods from around the world. South Street was nicknamed ‘the Street of Ships’ for the countless sailing ships that docked there, linking the city with some of the most important centers of trade in Europe, the Caribbean, South America, California, and China. The commercial activity along South Street had by the mid-nineteenth century transformed New York from a former British colonial outpost, into the largest city in the United States that controlled half the country’s trade.

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from pulsd:
Vintage & Costume Shopping: Sips & Eats
Vintage & Costume Shopping: Sips & Eats
Look For Vintage & Costume Finds While Enjoying Sips, Eats, And Vibes At Gemini & Scorpio
255 Douglass Street |
Today
1:00PM – 6:00PM

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