Category:

Food and Drink

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DATE AND TIME

Mon, February 12, 2018

6:30 PM – 8:00 PM EST

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LOCATION

Institute Of Culinary Education

225 Liberty Street

3rd Floor

New York, NY 10281

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DESCRIPTION

New York City has been a hub of chocolate manufacturing for centuries. In the mid-1700s, small, independent producers ground cocoa beans for local neighborhoods; later, chocolate was produced in mills that also turned out flour, mustard, oils, and paints; and in the nineteenth century, chocolate manufacturers clustered in lower Manhattan, creating a golden age of chocolate production in New York. But as smaller firms were absorbed by larger ones, and as manufacturing of all kinds left Manhattan, chocolate manufacturing disappeared, only to return decades later with the recent rise of small-batch craft producers. Michael Laiskonis will discuss how chocolate making in New York came full circle.

A chocolate tasting will precede the talk.

Michael Laiskonis was Executive Pastry Chef at Le Bernardin restaurant for eight years. He teaches and mentors future chefs, writes about food, and consults for major food industry companies. Michael Laiskonis launched the bean-to-bar Chocolate Lab at ICE in 2015.

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From Walter Grutchfield.net:

FThe J. M. Horton Ice Cream Company
back  The J. M. Horton Ice Cream Company, 302 Columbus Ave. New York, 2009   next
The J. M. Horton
Ice Cream Company
In 1860 James M. Horton was listed in Trow’s New York City Directory as an agent for the Orange County Milk Association.

In the 1861 New York city directory this ad for the Orange County Milk Association listed James M. Horton as president of the company. It also says that the company was organized in 1842 and incorporated 1 May 1860.

By 1873 James M. Horton was listed at 305 Fourth Ave., 1264 Broadway and 77 Chatham St., New York City. These, apparently, were the earliest locations of the J. M. Horton Ice Cream Co.

305 Fourth Ave.and 1264 Broadway are on this Horton’s Ice Cream ad from 1877.

305 Fourth Ave. and 75 Chatham St. are also on this Horton’s Ice Cream ad from 1879. 305 Fourth Ave. remained a Horton address from 1873 through 1914.

302 Columbus Ave. first appeared in directories in 1892 and remained a Horton location through 1922.

An F.Y.I. article in the New York Times, 19 March 2000, by Daniel B. Schneider, had this to say regarding 302 Columbus Ave., “At the turn of the 19th century, when the building at 302 Columbus was erected, the Horton company was supplying over half of New York City’s ice cream, but like other small local producers it was ultimately unable to compete with larger, more mechanized operations and by 1930 was absorbed by the Pioneer Ice Cream Division of Borden. Most building construction on Columbus Avenue followed the arrival of the Ninth Avenue el in 1881, and the fancy pediments on many former factory buildings were originally intended as rooftop advertisements, to be seen by riders on the trains passing overhead but all but invisible from the sidewalk below.”

The founder of the J. M. Horton Ice Cream Company was James Madison Horton (1835-1914). His obituary in the New York Times, 27 June 1914, read, “James Madison Horton, the well-known ice cream manufacturer, died yesterday at his home, 112 West 126th Street, at the age of 79. Mr. Horton was born on a farm near Middletown, N. Y., and in 1853 came to this city with his brother to engage in the milk business. From 1858 to 1869 he was President of the Orange County Milk Association and in 1870 first started in the ice cream business. He bought out a small business and reorganized it under the name of J. M. Horton & Co. In 1873 the firm was again reorganized, this time becoming the J. M. Horton Ice Cream Company, with a nominal capital of $40,000, and Mr. Horton became its President and chief stockholder. From this later start the business grew until today there are six stores and distributing centres in this city and several in Brooklyn. Mr. Horton was largely interested in real estate. In 1912 he transferred eleven pieces of property to his children, James M.…

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NY Adventure Club Presents: New Year’s Eve Speakeasy @ Civic Club Mansion

Don your flapper dress or three-piece tux and ring in the New Year inside a century-old mansion usually closed to the public, until now.

Join New York Adventure Club as we step back in time for an intimate, prohibition-era celebration inside a private mansion — originally built in 1899 for the Civic Club (which was dedicated to reducing poverty and gambling in the neighborhood), the house is now owned and operated by the New York Estonian Educational Society, which acts as the main center of Estonian culture on the U.S. Eastern seaboard

Once you relay the secret password at the entrance, you will enter into a highbrow affair and be treated to:

 

  • A host of interactive antique decor and props such as antique radios, Edison cylinders, stereoscopes (with prohibition-themed slides), and original prohibition prescriptions
  • Opportunities to purchase food and drinks from the house’s full restaurant and bar
  • Parlor games from the time period, including billiards and foosball
  • A champagne toast at midnight, which Volstead Act agents would have tried break up had they caught wind of it
  • Your ticket to this unique gathering includes entry into the private gilded age mansion, interactive opportunities with tons of authentic antiques from nearly a century ago, parlor games, and a glass of champagne to ring in the New Year.

     

    Flapper dress / black tie optional.

    See you there!

     


     

    Disclaimer

    Must be 21 or older.

    ID will be checked at door.

    By attending a New York Adventure Club experience, you accept our terms of service.

    Categories: Hidden Spots, Food, Historic Sites, Social

    58 tickets available

    $30

    Sunday, Dec 31
    9:30 PM – 1 AM

    New York

    Estonian House

    243 East 34th Street

    New York, NY 10016

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Victorian Holiday Party

What better way to celebrate the holidays than in a beautiful Victorian home? Enjoy offerings of hot spiced wine, apple cider and cookies while singing along to some traditional Christmas carols! Starting at 5pm, there will be a special radio performance by the Fireside Mystery Theatre. Victorian regalia welcomed! Tickets are $10, $8 Members/Students.

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December 15th: Winter Myths
Join us for a journey into the underworld of holiday lore and celestial solstice diversions! Victoria Flexner of Edible History will unveil the pagan roots of today’s seasonal traditions, followed by an astrological forecast for 2018 with astrologer Alice Sparkly Kat. Grab a cup from the cauldron of mulled wine and join in an introductory lesson on cult card game Magic: The Gathering, or browse the richly illustrated 19th-century McLoughlin Brothers children’s tales on view from the BHS collection. It’s the antidote to the holiday party circuit you’ve been waiting for, though tacky holiday sweaters are encouraged!

To learn more about the McLoughlin Brothers publishing firm and their vibrant picture books, visit the exhibition Radiant with Color & Art: McLoughlin Brothers and the Business of Picture Books, 1858-1920, on view now at The Grolier Club.

The Evening’s Schedule

5:00 pm – 9:00 pm A Magical Gathering
Test your might and the strength of your sorcery with a game of Magic: The Gathering! Tutorials available from local expert Peter Rawlings at 5:30 & 7:45.
Beginning at 5:45 pm Winter’s Tales
 Dig in to the BHS Archives for wintery folklore and stories from our collection of McLoughlin Brothers picture books. Stories of Santa Claus and other folk heroes come to life in vivid illustrations on these pages!
6:15 pm – 7:00 pm Winter Solstice & The Old Religion
Why did people choose some of the harshest months of the year as the focal point of their community holiday observations? Victoria Flexner of Edible History unveils and revisits some of the ancient &  Pagan roots of today’s holiday traditions.
7:15 pm – 8:00 pm What’s Going On?: An Astrological Analysis of Our Contemporary Climate
Astrologer Alice Sparkly Kat will talk about what will happen astrologically in 2018 in order to frame the near future as a segment of longer cycles. The intention of the discussion is to lead to an understanding of astrology as a tool for looking at time in a socially conscious way.
8:15 pm – 8:45 pm Folks, It’s Cold Outside
Warm up the ancient way: with a sample of cozy and spicy mulled wine! Enjoy a warm drink before heading home.

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120th Egg Nog Party, December 14
We thought it was just cream, eggs, sugar, and rum, but, hey, what do we know. Chemists, apparently, know the secret to the lip-smacking-est eggnog, and they’re letting us nonscientists have a taste at their annual holiday party. The Chemists’ Club has been hosting this ode to the ’nog for more than a century now, so its secret recipe must be one for the record books (or at least a cookbook). New York Academy of Science, 250 Greenwich Street (between Vesey and Barclay Streets), Tribeca

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The 141st George Washington Birthday Ball

Since 1877, the Sons of the Revolution in the State of New York have been hosting the George Washington Birthday Ball in honor of George Washington. This celebration is a fundraiser for Fraunces Tavern Museum, one of our country’s oldest and most important historical sites.  Fraunces Tavern was a meeting place for the Sons of Liberty. It was in the Tavern’s
Long Room where George Washington bid farewell to his officers after the British evacuated New York City. In 1785 the Tavern was leased by the government to house the Department of Foreign Affairs and in 1787 the Departments of Treasury and War moved in.

 

This year marks the 141st Ball as well as the 111th anniversary of the opening of Fraunces Tavern Museum.

 

We invite you to join the Benefit Committee and be an important part of this year’s Ball.  The Committee is composed of Society members, Museum members, individuals, organizations, foundations, and companies that support the mission of the Museum, which is to educate the public about the struggles, importance, and heroes of the American Revolution.

Your commitment to the Museum through the Benefit Committee will help to sustain the
only museum in New York City dedicated to the history of the American Revolution.  The
Museum receives about 30,000 visitors each year (a 300% increase over the past ten years), of whom 5,000 are schoolchildren participating in our interactive educational programming. The Museum presents annually rotating exhibits within our nine galleries, monthly lectures by notable authors and experts, and hosts local historical walking tours.

You can join the Benefit Committee by printing out and returning the Benefit Committee Form to Sons of the Revolution c/o Benefit Committee, 54 Pearl Street, New York, NY 10004. You can also join the Committee through our website by clicking HERE. As a Benefit Committee Member you are entitled to be listed on the invitation and in the Ball Journal.

 

This year’s George Washington Birthday Ball will be held at the Metropolitan Club located at 1 East 60th Street, New York, on Friday, February 16, 2018 at 7:00 pm. For those who cannot attend, we hope you will consider a contribution to help us continue our important educational mission.

 

Sincerely,

    Ambrose M. Richardson, III
President

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Thu 10 2017 , by

Bygone Buttered Rolls?

On the face of it, it doesn’t seem like the common coffee-accompanying buttered roll has become bygone from NYC and the surrounding areas of NJ and Connecticut in any measurable way. However, in many cases they aren’t what they used to be, and finding them made properly (with a fresh, handmade Kaiser roll and real salted butter) is becoming a lot more iffy. While buttered rolls can still be bought as such in many small shops, diners, and sidewalk coffee carts throughout the city, the general consensus is that since bygone days (mid-20th century) in the majority of cases the quality of the rolls has gone down due to modern developments such as the disappearance of smaller, regional/local bakeries, leading to the mass production and the lack of freshness and quality of the hard rolls, and lack of knowledge of how they are “supposed” to be has led to rolls without the requisite crispy crust or poppy seeds on top. Then there is the butter, or lack thereof: the more frequent use of margarine of varying taste and mouthfeel by those who sell them, topped off by vendors wrapping them in plastic wrap in deference to modern sanitary sensibilities but giving the rolls the savor of the plastic. The comments section from this NY Times article about the phenomena of buttered Kaiser rolls or “butter rolls” as they are called in popular parlance is revealing: besides having arrived in NYC via “The Vienna Model Bakery” in 1870, which also brought commercial yeasted bread to the city, they derived from German/Austrian Jewish cuisine: one commentator reveals that her father called them “jew rolls” when at home, but not to appear anti-Semitic, ordered “hard rolls” from the local bakery. (In many cases, a local bakery was involved in the production of good old fashioned rolls with butter as they ought to have been-it is the scarcity of general purpose local bakeries that has been partly responsible for the taste and quality of buttered rolls becoming more frequently bygone.) How are the bastardized versions that have become widely available in our time still selling? For the same reason the original and better-tasting ones did: they might be the only thing some people can afford to eat all day. They are cheap and filling, though of dubious nutritional value. —

Ode to the Buttered Roll, That New York Lifeline

It can be hard to explain the appeal of a buttered roll.

Unlike the breakfast sandwich or the cruller, the humble buttered roll makes no claims to lusciousness. It’s not really greater than the sum of its parts: a round roll, sliced and slathered with butter. There is no alchemy involved.

And yet, like many New Yorkers, I’ve breakfasted all my life on buttered rolls, wrapped in plastic, foil or wax paper and sold for about a dollar at any corner deli, bodega or coffee cart.

Do I love them? No. That is not really the point. I love that they exist, an unsung, charmingly ordinary hero of the city’s mornings.…

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