Category:

Food and Drink

The 141st George Washington Birthday Ball

Since 1877, the Sons of the Revolution in the State of New York have been hosting the George Washington Birthday Ball in honor of George Washington. This celebration is a fundraiser for Fraunces Tavern Museum, one of our country’s oldest and most important historical sites.  Fraunces Tavern was a meeting place for the Sons of Liberty. It was in the Tavern’s
Long Room where George Washington bid farewell to his officers after the British evacuated New York City. In 1785 the Tavern was leased by the government to house the Department of Foreign Affairs and in 1787 the Departments of Treasury and War moved in.

 

This year marks the 141st Ball as well as the 111th anniversary of the opening of Fraunces Tavern Museum.

 

We invite you to join the Benefit Committee and be an important part of this year’s Ball.  The Committee is composed of Society members, Museum members, individuals, organizations, foundations, and companies that support the mission of the Museum, which is to educate the public about the struggles, importance, and heroes of the American Revolution.

Your commitment to the Museum through the Benefit Committee will help to sustain the
only museum in New York City dedicated to the history of the American Revolution.  The
Museum receives about 30,000 visitors each year (a 300% increase over the past ten years), of whom 5,000 are schoolchildren participating in our interactive educational programming. The Museum presents annually rotating exhibits within our nine galleries, monthly lectures by notable authors and experts, and hosts local historical walking tours.

You can join the Benefit Committee by printing out and returning the Benefit Committee Form to Sons of the Revolution c/o Benefit Committee, 54 Pearl Street, New York, NY 10004. You can also join the Committee through our website by clicking HERE. As a Benefit Committee Member you are entitled to be listed on the invitation and in the Ball Journal.

 

This year’s George Washington Birthday Ball will be held at the Metropolitan Club located at 1 East 60th Street, New York, on Friday, February 16, 2018 at 7:00 pm. For those who cannot attend, we hope you will consider a contribution to help us continue our important educational mission.

 

Sincerely,

    Ambrose M. Richardson, III
President

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Thu 10 2017 , by

Bygone Buttered Rolls?

On the face of it, it doesn’t seem like the common coffee-accompanying buttered roll has become bygone from NYC and the surrounding areas of NJ and Connecticut in any measurable way. However, in many cases they aren’t what they used to be, and finding them made properly (with a fresh, handmade Kaiser roll and real salted butter) is becoming a lot more iffy. While buttered rolls can still be bought as such in many small shops, diners, and sidewalk coffee carts throughout the city, the general consensus is that since bygone days (mid-20th century) in the majority of cases the quality of the rolls has gone down due to modern developments such as the disappearance of smaller, regional/local bakeries, leading to the mass production and the lack of freshness and quality of the hard rolls, and lack of knowledge of how they are “supposed” to be has led to rolls without the requisite crispy crust or poppy seeds on top. Then there is the butter, or lack thereof: the more frequent use of margarine of varying taste and mouthfeel by those who sell them, topped off by vendors wrapping them in plastic wrap in deference to modern sanitary sensibilities but giving the rolls the savor of the plastic. The comments section from this NY Times article about the phenomena of buttered Kaiser rolls or “butter rolls” as they are called in popular parlance is revealing: besides having arrived in NYC via “The Vienna Model Bakery” in 1870, which also brought commercial yeasted bread to the city, they derived from German/Austrian Jewish cuisine: one commentator reveals that her father called them “jew rolls” when at home, but not to appear anti-Semitic, ordered “hard rolls” from the local bakery. (In many cases, a local bakery was involved in the production of good old fashioned rolls with butter as they ought to have been-it is the scarcity of general purpose local bakeries that has been partly responsible for the taste and quality of buttered rolls becoming more frequently bygone.) How are the bastardized versions that have become widely available in our time still selling? For the same reason the original and better-tasting ones did: they might be the only thing some people can afford to eat all day. They are cheap and filling, though of dubious nutritional value. —

Ode to the Buttered Roll, That New York Lifeline

It can be hard to explain the appeal of a buttered roll.

Unlike the breakfast sandwich or the cruller, the humble buttered roll makes no claims to lusciousness. It’s not really greater than the sum of its parts: a round roll, sliced and slathered with butter. There is no alchemy involved.

And yet, like many New Yorkers, I’ve breakfasted all my life on buttered rolls, wrapped in plastic, foil or wax paper and sold for about a dollar at any corner deli, bodega or coffee cart.

Do I love them? No. That is not really the point. I love that they exist, an unsung, charmingly ordinary hero of the city’s mornings.…

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From Jeremiah’s Vanishing New York:

Tuesday, October 10, 2017

The Noho Star & Temple Bar

VANISHING

On Lafayette Street since 1985, The Noho Star still has an old-school vibe that attracts low-key neighborhood people along with New York luminaries like Chuck Close, Wallace Shawn, and Lauren Hutton. The restaurant’s sister spot, Temple Bar, opened in 1989.

Now both are about to vanish.

The owners recently filed a Worker Adjustment and Retraining Notification (WARN) with the New York State Department of Labor, indicating plans to lay off Noho Star’s staff of 54 workers and close the restaurant on December 31.

Under “Reason for Dislocation,” it says “Economic.” The same listing is given for Temple Bar–all 13 employees laid off and the place closed December 31.

Noho Star and Temple Bar were both opened by George Schwarz, a 1930s German-Jewish emigre who began his New York restaurant empire in 1973 with Elephant and Castle in Greenwich Village, followed by One Fifth (since closed). He then acquired and revived the great Keens Chop House when it closed in 1978. From there, he and his artist wife, Kiki Kogelnik, opened Noho Star and Temple Bar. They also bought the building.

Schwarz died not a year ago, in December 2016. His friend Bonnie Jenkins, long-time manager of Keens, is Vice President of the closing restaurants. (Jenkins prefers not to comment on the closures at this time.)

There are no indications that the shutter is coming for Keens or Elephant and Castle.


Eggs Idaho

Only in the past few years did I finally find my way to Noho Star. In a neighborhood of dwindling options, it’s one of the last comfortable places to get a decent meal, i.e., a place that attracts a mixed-age crowd and doesn’t play loud music (or any music) while you eat. It’s a place where a person can dine alone, reading The Times (on paper) or The London Review of Books (as recently witnessed). It’s a place where you can think.

I will miss it.

from The Comments Section:

 

MKB said…

The Noho Star in turn replaced a dusty and old office supply store (where you could still buy V-Mail stationery as late as the Seventies) and NYC’s worst restaurant. That restaurant was so bad junkies and narcs (back in the day when a narc disguise was a serape and a wig) were the main customers. Why was I there? It was also the cheapest and right around the corner from my place on Mott.
I am so very sad that the Noho Star will be no more. Lots of memories.

October 10, 2017 at 4:30 PM

 …

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Battle of Prohibition Cocktails. NYC Top Cocktail Mixologists Face Off! Join the Party!

We’re taking over an entire lower east side hot spot Casa Mezcal for this party.

Location

86 Orchard St

Caza Mezcal

New York, NY 10002

View Map

Bring your best 1920s look! Dressing up is encouraged.

Last call to celebrate Summer and it’s your last chance to get in on the most epic summer event in New York City. For one last hurray to summer, we’re highlighting a must see event: a Speakeasy style bartender battle thrown by Postcard, your way to uncover NYC in a new way. It’s New York’s sizzling app that shows you all the hottest venues and events around you, live…

PLEASE NOTE: While it is a free event, and you don’t need to buy any tickets (you do need to rsvp), we are currently closing in on the exciting new version of Postcard app and would value your feedback.

Please note that you do need to have Free Postcard app installed to join in this event. This will be main part of your admission ticket, you will show postcard app on your phone. (you can install the app for free at itunes)

Here are the 2 steps you will need to do before the event:

For Iphone: Install postcard app (it’s free, get it here). Now just RSVP on Eventbrite, and you are ready for the party!

For Android: If you don’t have iphone, bring a friend (who needs to follow step 1) who does and you both get in! (make sure to rsvp either you or your friend)

fitzgerald.jpg

Which mixologist will make the better Prohibition cocktail?

Try them both and be the judge.

The Postcard app has been a leading source of all the best nightlife spots since their launch this July, and they’re sending off summer in style. Already the app has been used by top influencers, instagrammers, and even celebrities in NYC. If you haven’t tried it yet, you definitely should.

@tamarazhukova.jpg

“My friends and I like to go where the people are and the app always shows us exactly where to go to have the best night out”

– Tamara Zhukova, NYC Fashion Model (in the photo above)

The Prohibition era was full of fun and revelry, the roaring twenties, flapper girls, post war partying, and of course, secret drinking at speakeasies aka “juice joints”. So it’s not surprising that today’s cocktails get their heaviest influence from this era, and liquors like gin, rye, and scotch have made a comeback in a big way.

This event’s two featured liquors, gin and scotch, have a special Prohibition history behind them.

cocktail-battle.jpg

Both were touted as industrial alcohols. Bootleggers with chemists on staff would strip away the denaturant (the dangerous stuff) in industrial high school lab ethanol, add colors and spices, and label it as premium European scotch or gin. Lucky for us, at this event we get to enjoy the real deal with all the fun, wild, and creative flavors that made these cocktails great!…

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April 2017 marks fifty years since the
Museum received its charter from the New
York State Department of Education Board of
Regents. Over that fifty years the Museum has
grown dramatically, collecting artifacts and
works of art documenting the rise of New York
as a port city.; developing and implementing
innovative and award-winning programming;
mounting exhibitions; and preserving a fleet of
historic ships on the East River. Despite three
massive setbacks: the 9/11 attacks, the Great
Recession of 2008, and the floodwaters of hurri-
cane Sandy, the museum is growing once again.
With support from New York City and a dedi-
cated group of staff, volunteers, members and
friends, the Seaport Museum remains an edu-
cational and cultural gem in lower Manhattan.
The Seaport Museum’s 50th anniversary will
be marked throughout the year with the open-
ing of new exhibitions, including Millions:
Migrants and Millionaires aboard the Great
Liners, 1900-1914 (opening June 2017), artistic
and musical performances, lectures and book
talks, walking tours, and a formal 50th anni-
versary cocktail reception aboard the 1885 ship
Wavertree in September. #

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Secret Speakeasy
Prohibition theme!
16mm Short Films, Antiques & Music!
in Soho

Sun Sept 17th
6pm – 10pm All Ages

See 16mm vintage short films
Hear original vinyl records
Enjoy actual prohibition antiques
you can handle and get demonstrated!
Drink and enjoy refreshments!

There will be “nurses” and “doctors” since alcohol is prohibited…unless you have an ailment and require a prescription from the early 1900’s. Choose your ailment
headache, rheumatism, bedwetting or hysteria!

In the spirit of a true Speakeasy
Anything can change so…
Please check this website before leaving.

http://secretspeakeasy.com/

The Museum of Interesting Things
takes over a Soho loft for a special

16mm movie & music fest & party!
Drinks, music & beautiful visuals!
We will bring items from our vast collection of photography / film / prohibition & music items
All eras of history some over 100 years old!
See Old 16mm circus, animations, vaudeville and more

The Museum has a show featuring
Original Rare 16mm short films from the
1940’s, 1950’s and 1960’s
and you get to pick the films allll night!

Early 1900’s and some 1800’s
Stereoviews and Mutoscope cards!

The Loft at Prince Street 177 Prince Street
3rd Floor $10 to help the Museum 🙂
Between Thompson & Sullivan street
in Soho NYC 212 274 8757

This is a loungie place….so please let us know
If you have special needs and require seating.

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Capturing the Lower East Side’s Disappearing Mom-and-Pop Storefronts, a photography and oral history exhibition, opens tonight, 6pm, at Theater For The New City Gallery, 155 1st Ave [10th]. It’s curated by James and Karla Murray, the husband-and-wife photography team that have documented so many mom-and pop-storefronts, compiled in their books Store Front: The Disappearing Face of New York and its followup.

The show is intended to raise awareness of the essential NYC character that these businesses embody, threatened by skyrocketing rents. You’ll see the work of 30 photographers who participated in two workshops in April and June with the Murrays focusing on neighborhood stores. Since the workshops took place, two of the stores photographed by participants have closed.

The event is free and there will be complimentary wine and beer, as well as small bites, provided by local indie merchants, of course.…

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Monday July 24

 

6:30 PM  –  8:00 PM

Nuyorican Poets Café, 236 E 3rd St

Since it opened in 1854, McSorley’s Old Ale House has been a New York institution. This is the landmark watering hole where Abraham Lincoln campaigned and Boss Tweed kicked back with the Tammany Hall machine; where a pair of Houdini’s handcuffs found their final resting place;and where soldiers left behind wishbones before departing for the First World War, never to return and collect them. Many of the bar’s traditions remain intact, from the newspaper-covered walls to the plates of cheese and raw onions, the sawdust-covered floors to the tall-tales told by its bartenders.

McSorley’s is also home to deep, personal stories – including that of Geoffrey “Bart” Bartholomew, a career bartender of 45 years, and his son Rafe who grew up helping his dad at the landmark bar. Join Rafe to talk about his new book on the topic, where he explores McSorley’s bizarre rituals, bawdy humor, and eccentric tasks, including protecting decades-old dust on treasured artifacts and defending a 150-year-old space against the worst of Hurricane Sandy.

Free. Reservations required.
[This event is not accessible.]

Free
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From Bowery Boogie:

Breaking: ‘Cup & Saucer’ Ending Service on Monday After Decades on Canal Street

Posted on: July 12th, 2017 at 12:39 pm by

Say goodbye to that classic 1940s Coca-Cola sign at the corner of Eldridge and Canal Streets. Word on the block is that the fabled luncheonette, Cup & Saucer, is hanging it up. It’s closing shop after decades serving the neighborhood, thanks to a steep rent hike.

And there’s no time for you to process this information, either, as the last day of business is Monday.

Every few years, rumors surface detailing a demise that was continuously eluded. Especially after the building reportedly sold several years ago, creating much uncertainty whether the business would actually survive. Co-owner John Vasilopoulos told Metro in 2015 that he hoped the new owner would maintain the 5-year lease arrangement of the predecessor to keep afloat. Then there was the recent upstairs fire back in January, which no doubt threatened the operation. This time, however, it appears the talk is true. A tipster who frequents the establishment daily was informed by staff of the closure. Apparently, they started telling all the regular customers today.

We don’t really know what to say. The Cup & Saucer is a no-frills Lower East Side treasure that serves all strata of the community. “Giving the people of New York quality food, fast delivery, and great customer service,” as its website prominently touts. On any given morning, you find construction workers, commuters, travelers, and locals mingling at the countertop.

It’s been under the same ownership for nearly thirty years. Partners Nick Castanos (also a cook) and John Vasilopoulos took over the business in 1988, yet local lore suggests the corner kitchen dates back some 77 years. The duo also owns a diner in Ridgewood, Queens.

Our tipster surmises that the luncheonette also fell victim to the effects of failed development (i.e. the Canal Tower) and the encroaching Chinatown Bus situation that’s multiplying along Canal Street between Forsyth and Allen.


Visual Documentation of the distinguishing interior features of the now-bygone The Cup & Saucer Luncheonette (from Untapped Cities.com)

Iconic NYC Diner “The Cup & Saucer” Closing Down After Nearly 70 Years

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