Category:

Music and Dancing

 E-mailed newsletter from Denny Daniel:
Hi Hi!

It was hard to pick interesting things for this monthly news thingy. We got some really cool stuff! Scroll down to see some. I have been posting really cool stuff on our Instagram & FB & Twitter like our Tesla show (where I met his oldest relative) and new box openings 🙂 Below is also info on Museum show Themes and Booking info of course too 🙂

And best of all the Summer of Love Secret Speakeasy and 3D VHS fest coming up and so many more shows!

– Sun July 23rd, 2017 6pm-10pm all ages
is the Museum Summer of Love Secret Speakeasy

We will debut vintage 16mm films of Bob Dylan, The Beatles, Jefferson Airplane and more! And have clothes you take selfies with!
http://www.secretspeakeasy.com/

** If you want the Museum to come to you or to visit see below or just email or call.

– Thur July 20th, 2017 7pm we are at the City Reliquary for a 3D VHS fest! Our 1st there!
https://www.facebook.com/events/1928505230514357/?acontext=%7B%22ref%22%3A%2222%22%2C%22feed_story_type%22%3A%2222%22%2C%22action_history%22%3A%22null%22%7D&pnref=story

– Sat July 15th, 2017 5pm-7pm the Adventure Club (the coolest site!) has our 16mm Jazz fest
https://www.eventbrite.com/e/the-history-of-film-through-short-film-screenings-rare-16mm-jazz-soundies-registration-35356195332

Cool News! someone came to the Speakeasy and did a wonderful article and video.
http://bedfordandbowery.com/2017/06/the-museum-of-interesting-things-is-a-roving-speakeasy-run-by-a-quirky-curator/

The Museum got some cool new things (I put some pics below for you to check out)

You can now visit our offices on Broadway!  woohoo 🙂
Details are below to schedule a visit here or to have the Museum come to you.

I send only 1 email a month but if you wanna see more pics, events or learn more interesting things then FB the Museum. 🙂 
https://www.facebook.com/museumthings

NOW WE HAVE Instagram
https://www.instagram.com/museumthings/

And even Twitter! (using carrier pigeon of course!)
https://twitter.com/dennydaniel

– Teachers/Event gurus, Librarians, humans, the Museum has sooo many new items and themed exhibitions in nearly every subject from science to history / music to photography and more that we can bring to your school or event email or call.
We have some great themes listed below like Eureka! The History of Invention, The Windup Circus & the 16mm Sing-A-Long and other 16mm festivals like music, jazz, Animation, Space and WW2,  The History of Communication, photography, the 3D VHS fest, also science, Suffragettes, WW2/cold war antiques and any era of history and even math and music!

Dennydanielx@gmail.com 212 274 8757
www.museumofinterestingthings.com

– Here are some library shows, Mineola Libr Jul 22 10-5, Port Jeff Libr 11am adults & 2pm kids July 29th Roosevelt Library Aug 1 at 1pm .

– Also, scroll down, we are partnering with many companies to get you guys discounts on food and things like Doc Mac & TAJ AND our newest partner a 10% discount at Once Upon A Tart if you mention the Museum, see below 🙂

– Last but certainly not least…More More More New Things are below too! Soon we will launch our YouTube channel with Box Openings and more! Stay tuned….

More details for everything below  🙂

Hope to catch ya sooooon!

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The Grand Neptune Ball

Open Bar. Live Band. High Seas. (A Fundraiser.)

A celebration on the historic Waterfront Museum Barge –  a boat and nonprofit that is raising funds for renewed arts and education programs after our Superstorm Sandy refit.

Join us for free local fare and spirits! And for the midsummer sunset! Come to dance to live jazz! Come as your most extravagant self! Come support arts and education aboard the historic barge!! Cocktail attire, and any a nod to the maritime 1920s, is encouraged. Music by Steve Oates and the Zac Greenberg Quartet.

The Waterfront Barge
July 22, 2017 at 8-11pm
290 Conover St. Brooklyn, NY
Tickets $50 – $100 (Tax-deductible)

Tickets can be purchased here and at the door.

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Take a fascinatingly risqué journey through time at this immersive lecture and multi-act burlesque show.

  • Sunday, July 9, 2017
  • 7:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m.
  • $20.00 USD
  • 635 Sackett Street, Brooklyn, New York, 11217, United States

Join the Atlas Obscura Society New York for an evening of bawdy discovery and lively libations as we delve into the history of burlesque, an enchanting form of performance that has shimmied, shaked, and shifted with the times over a transformative century in America.

The sensational Doctor Lucky, the World’s Premiere Ph(Double)D, will be your guide as we fill your imaginations with titillating tales from the past. Doctor Lucky’s long and deep resume includes the production of many popular burlesque shows and the instruction of students at prestigious establishments such as NYU, MICA, and CUNY on “The History of American Burlesque.”

As Lucky chronicles the story of burlesque, a dazzling array of in-the-flesh performances will demonstrate a range of burlesque styles from the past and present. You’ll be invited to sip from specialty cocktails prepared by the bar as you’re swept away by revealing historical revelations on the new, state-of-the-art Littlefield stage.

Performers for this event have been curated to include many of the greatest currently operating in the New York scene: Gin Minsky, Corvette Le Face, Ms. Tickle, Perle NoireLil’ Miss Lixx and the Lady Aye.

DETAILS

QUESTIONS?

Email michelle.bruenn@atlasobscura.com.

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JUN24

Victorian Picnic – June 24, 2017 (RAIN DATE: JULY 8)

Public

  • Saturday, June 24 at 1:00 PM5:00 PM EDT
    Starts in about 6 hours · 23° Heavy Rain
  • pin

    Central Park

    5 Av To Central Park W, 59 St To 110 St, Manhattan, New York 10022Saturday, June 24, 2017
    1:00 p.m.
    meet at 103rd Street and Central Park West
    RAIN DATE:
    Saturday, July 8IF IT RAINS, WE WILL ANNOUNCE RESCHEDULING PLANS BY 10:30 AM

    As the sunny days grow longer, one often desires a happy excursion to whittle away the hours with friends. What better way to do so than with a Victorian picnic? Join the New York 19th Century Society for an afternoon of dining al fresco, good conversation, reading aloud, lawn games of the gentler sort, and photography.

    Bring food or drink to share. Suggested attire (not required): summer whites, garden party frocks, tea dress, steampunk, Goth, or Lolita.

    We will gather at 103rd Street and Central Park West. Once everyone is assembled, we’ll find a quiet meadow in the North Woods nearby to spread our blankets and enjoy food and drink.

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Jazz Age Lawn Party: June 10-11 & August 26 -27 2017

“I can’t think of a more delightful way to spend a weekend in the city“

-Bill Cunningham, The New York Times 2014

The Jazz Age Lawn Party is New York City’s original prohibition era inspired gathering. Hosted and conceived by Michael Arenella, the event started as a small gathering of perhaps fifty friends and fans. The event, initially produced by the island, was handed over to Michael in its third year to organize and grow. Under his watch, the event was carefully crafted and nurtured, becoming what is now referred to by The Wall Street Journal as, “the biggest (not to mention the cleanest and most family-oriented) regular event in the ‘Retro Noveau’ movement…” It was at this time that St-Germain joined forces with The Lawn Party, delightfully whetting the whistles of fops and flappers with their refreshing summer cocktails.

Selected by The New York Times as one of the most memorable events of 2011 and 2012, The Jazz Age Lawn Party offers a magical opportunity to travel back in time. Two weekends a year, guests are invited to discover and experience one of the most colorful and formative epochs in American history.…

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From Curbed:

Harlem’s legendary Lenox Lounge is being demolished

The site is rumored to give way to a massive Sephora

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from Atlas Obscura:

Last Century a DJ Saved My Life

New York City’s oldest-school spinners are two phonograph-loving guys named Mike.

Mike Haar (left) and Michael A. Cumella, preparing for a set.
Mike Haar (left) and Michael A. Cumella, preparing for a set. Courtesy Michael A. Cumella

If you’re in New York City, and you like to dance, you’ve got a lot of options. A typical night offers everything from punk shows to EDM nights to tango classes to old-school hip hop. It is the city that never sleeps, after all.

But what if you’re really old school—like ragtime-vs-jazz, Ma-Rainey-for-life, beat-anyone-in-a-jitterbug-contest old school? Never fear: there’s someone out there spinning for you, too. Michael Cumella and Mike Haar, New York’s premiere phonograph DJs, both love music from the early 1900s. For decades now, they’ve spent their spare time keeping it alive, one hand-cranked revolution at a time.

The first three decades of the 20th century saw an explosion of musical experimentation, as ballads and military marches gave way to jazz, blues, country, and early R&B. Although much of this invention was happening live, in dance halls and on vaudeville stages, some of it ended up etched into 78-rpm discs, or “78s.” Fans would buy these and play them in their living rooms, on big-horned phonographs.

What recording a song looked like in 1905. Here, a piano player records directly into a phonograph horn, which carves the music directly onto a 78 record.
What recording a song looked like in 1905. Here, a piano player records directly into a phonograph horn, which carves the music directly onto a 78 record. National Photo Gallery/Public Domain

Fast forward a century or so, and despite the repeated terraforming of the music technology landscape, one thing hasn’t changed: if you want to listen to a recording from the early 1900s, you pretty much have to do it the old-fashioned way, via a 78 played through a phonograph. Cumella learned this about 30 years ago. “I’ve always collected records, and I wanted to go back farther with music,” he says. “At a certain point, you have to encounter the 78 era. There wasn’t much reissued, so if you’re interested in it, you start to acquire those kinds of records, and the machines that people played them on.”

He was quickly hooked. In 1995, he started spinning 78s on the radio, hosting a show called “The Antique Phonograph Music Program” on WFMU. He did his first live gig soon after, upon request. “Someone contacted me and said, ‘We’re having a party, would you come and DJ with the phonographs?’” he recalls. “I was like, ‘You know what they sound like, right?’” After a few other one-offs, a friend of his encouraged him to get serious: “‘It’s your thing now,’ she told me.” He had some business cards made up, and he now plays live a few times a month, at jazz festivals, record fairs, and weddings.

Phonograph DJing takes dexterity—you’ve got to change the needle (every two songs!), switch out the 78s, and keep the machine cranked. But rather than focusing on traditional DJ calling cards (volume, hipness, smooth transitions), Cumella generally goes for a more interactive experience.

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-Event Passed-

from CityLimits.org:

April 29 @ 11:00 am5:00 pm

South Street Seaport Museum celebrates its 50th Anniversary

The South Street Seaport Museum, situated in the original port that built New York into the city it is today, will celebrate fifty years this year! The Seaport Museum invites the city to join in the celebration of this important milestone, which will be recognized over an entire year (April 2017-April 2018) of special programming and exhibitions. …

April 2017 marks fifty years since the Museum received its charter from the New York State Department of Education Board of Regents. Over that fifty years the Museum has grown dramatically, collecting artifacts and works of art documenting the rise of New York as a port city.; developing and implementing innovative and award-winning programming; mounting exhibitions; and preserving a fleet of historic ships on the East River. Despite three massive setbacks: the 9/11 attacks, the Great Recession of 2008, and the floodwaters of hurricane Sandy, the museum is growing once again. With support from New York City and a dedicated group of staff, volunteers, members and friends, the Seaport Museum remains an educational and cultural gem in lower Manhattan.

The Seaport Museum’s 50th anniversary will be marked throughout the year with the opening of new exhibitions, including Millions: Migrants and Millionaires aboard the Great Liners, 1900-1914 (opening June 2017), artistic and musical performances, lectures and book talks, walking tours, and a formal 50th anniversary cocktail reception aboard the 1885 ship Wavertree in September.

Capt. Jonathan Boulware, Executive Director of the Museum, spoke enthusiastically about the anniversary. “It’s a great privilege to celebrate the five-decade life of this vital institution. We’re here in the original fabric of old New York, the ships, the piers, the 19th-century buildings. It’s the history of New York, but the topics we cover are still highly relevant today. The original values that made New York what it is, the Dutch values of trade and tolerance, the New York values of immigration, of multiculturalism, and of ambition, these all touch on urgent issues of New York and America today. Indeed, as we celebrate this important anniversary, we’re also celebrating the very best of New York values, past, present, and future.”

A brief history of the Seaport Museum:
The Museum proper is housed several buildings known collectively as Schermerhorn Row, but when completed in 1812, Schermerhorn Row was, in many respects, the city’s first world trade center. The Row housed a series of counting houses where merchants bought and sold coffee, tea, cotton, molasses, and countless other trade goods from around the world. South Street was nicknamed ‘the Street of Ships’ for the countless sailing ships that docked there, linking the city with some of the most important centers of trade in Europe, the Caribbean, South America, California, and China. The commercial activity along South Street had by the mid-nineteenth century transformed New York from a former British colonial outpost, into the largest city in the United States that controlled half the country’s trade.

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In 1883 Mrs. William K. (Alva) Vanderbilt was determined for her family to be accepted into proper society although The Mrs. Astor, the gatekeeper of the exclusive 400, had done everything to keep out the tacky nouveau riche. To her, the Vanderbilts were vulgar and their ostentatious display of wealth were garish and offensive. But after William and Alva built their majestic ‘Petit Chateau’ at 660 Fifth Avenue, they could no longer be ignored. The Vanderbilts opened their majestic home by throwing an extravagant party and invited New York’s leading families. By manipulating the press and the city’s elite, Alva masterfully forced Mrs. Astor to accept her and the Vanderbilts into her rarified circle. Join us as we present the details and drama surrounding this ball and learn how gilded age society was consumed by its own excess.

NOTE: There is one flight of stairs to event space.

Tickets are $35 through eventbrite.com

INSTAGRAM @colonnaderow + @mansionsofthegildedage

Click here for Facebook page

Date and Time

Sun, April 9, 2017

4:00 PM – 6:00 PM EDT

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Location

Colonnade Row

New York, NY 10003

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