Category:

Performing Arts/Theater

Take a fascinatingly risqué journey through time at this immersive lecture and multi-act burlesque show.

  • Sunday, July 9, 2017
  • 7:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m.
  • $20.00 USD
  • 635 Sackett Street, Brooklyn, New York, 11217, United States

Join the Atlas Obscura Society New York for an evening of bawdy discovery and lively libations as we delve into the history of burlesque, an enchanting form of performance that has shimmied, shaked, and shifted with the times over a transformative century in America.

The sensational Doctor Lucky, the World’s Premiere Ph(Double)D, will be your guide as we fill your imaginations with titillating tales from the past. Doctor Lucky’s long and deep resume includes the production of many popular burlesque shows and the instruction of students at prestigious establishments such as NYU, MICA, and CUNY on “The History of American Burlesque.”

As Lucky chronicles the story of burlesque, a dazzling array of in-the-flesh performances will demonstrate a range of burlesque styles from the past and present. You’ll be invited to sip from specialty cocktails prepared by the bar as you’re swept away by revealing historical revelations on the new, state-of-the-art Littlefield stage.

Performers for this event have been curated to include many of the greatest currently operating in the New York scene: Gin Minsky, Corvette Le Face, Ms. Tickle, Perle NoireLil’ Miss Lixx and the Lady Aye.

DETAILS

QUESTIONS?

Email michelle.bruenn@atlasobscura.com.

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New York City in the 1970s was perceived as a place of danger, decay, and paranoia, where people “didn’t get involved” — especially following high-profile crimes like the 1964 murder of Kitty Genovese. Read more about the legacy of the Genovese murder here.

Reviews

“Offers several dozen movies about New York that were made in the ’70s and consistently showed a city with a fading pulse. One way or another, they depict a city spinning toward a hell.”
– Clyde Haberman, The New York Times. Read the full article here.

“A MAMMOTH THROWBACK TO A GRITTIER ERA OF CITY LIFE!” 
– Ben Kenigsberg, The New York Times

“Celebrates New York at its 1970s scuzziest.” 
– J. Hoberman, The New York Review of Books

One of the most fertile periods of filmmaking in cinematic history comes back to life!”
– Robert Levin, AM New York. Read the full July 5 cover story here.

“[In the 70s,] urban blight crossed paths with Hollywood’s new interest in true grit, creating a perfect storm of films that showed the city at its worst, its people at their most desperate.”
– Matt Prigge, Metro

“FABULOUS! The films shot on location in NYC in the 1970s have become relics of a very different New York: accidental documentaries of what the city once was.”
– Jason Bailey, Flavorwire 

Trailer

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sat 5pm: take in the view of the manhattan skyline as participants (maybe
you?) sound their own barbaric yawp during the 13th annual marathon
reading of walt whitman’s ‘song of myself.’ brooklyn bridge park’s granite
prospect, free.

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Movie Series Dealing With Life in Brooklyn at the Metrograph

Making Rent in Bed-Stuy

June 9 to June 12

On the occasion of the release of Brandon Harris’s first book, Making Rent in Bed-Stuy: A Memoir of Trying to Make it in New York City, called “a rebuke, in a form newly discovered, to the people James Baldwin once called ‘our morally dishonest and desperately dishonest countrymen,” by N+1 founder Keith Gessen, Metrograph is pleased to present six films that speak to the neighborhood and surrounding area’s rich cultural and political legacy as a black space, the lives of some of its most famous scions and as a bulwark, increasingly imperiled, for Brooklyn’s black population.

Brandon Harris to introduce Crooklyn on June 9. Following the screening, Harris will be signing copies of his book, Making Rent in Bed-Stuy.

A Q&A with Sebastián Silva and Brandon Harris to follow the screening of Nasty Baby.

Program notes by Brandon Harris

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From Curbed:

Harlem’s legendary Lenox Lounge is being demolished

The site is rumored to give way to a massive Sephora

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from Atlas Obscura:

Last Century a DJ Saved My Life

New York City’s oldest-school spinners are two phonograph-loving guys named Mike.

Mike Haar (left) and Michael A. Cumella, preparing for a set.
Mike Haar (left) and Michael A. Cumella, preparing for a set. Courtesy Michael A. Cumella

If you’re in New York City, and you like to dance, you’ve got a lot of options. A typical night offers everything from punk shows to EDM nights to tango classes to old-school hip hop. It is the city that never sleeps, after all.

But what if you’re really old school—like ragtime-vs-jazz, Ma-Rainey-for-life, beat-anyone-in-a-jitterbug-contest old school? Never fear: there’s someone out there spinning for you, too. Michael Cumella and Mike Haar, New York’s premiere phonograph DJs, both love music from the early 1900s. For decades now, they’ve spent their spare time keeping it alive, one hand-cranked revolution at a time.

The first three decades of the 20th century saw an explosion of musical experimentation, as ballads and military marches gave way to jazz, blues, country, and early R&B. Although much of this invention was happening live, in dance halls and on vaudeville stages, some of it ended up etched into 78-rpm discs, or “78s.” Fans would buy these and play them in their living rooms, on big-horned phonographs.

What recording a song looked like in 1905. Here, a piano player records directly into a phonograph horn, which carves the music directly onto a 78 record.
What recording a song looked like in 1905. Here, a piano player records directly into a phonograph horn, which carves the music directly onto a 78 record. National Photo Gallery/Public Domain

Fast forward a century or so, and despite the repeated terraforming of the music technology landscape, one thing hasn’t changed: if you want to listen to a recording from the early 1900s, you pretty much have to do it the old-fashioned way, via a 78 played through a phonograph. Cumella learned this about 30 years ago. “I’ve always collected records, and I wanted to go back farther with music,” he says. “At a certain point, you have to encounter the 78 era. There wasn’t much reissued, so if you’re interested in it, you start to acquire those kinds of records, and the machines that people played them on.”

He was quickly hooked. In 1995, he started spinning 78s on the radio, hosting a show called “The Antique Phonograph Music Program” on WFMU. He did his first live gig soon after, upon request. “Someone contacted me and said, ‘We’re having a party, would you come and DJ with the phonographs?’” he recalls. “I was like, ‘You know what they sound like, right?’” After a few other one-offs, a friend of his encouraged him to get serious: “‘It’s your thing now,’ she told me.” He had some business cards made up, and he now plays live a few times a month, at jazz festivals, record fairs, and weddings.

Phonograph DJing takes dexterity—you’ve got to change the needle (every two songs!), switch out the 78s, and keep the machine cranked. But rather than focusing on traditional DJ calling cards (volume, hipness, smooth transitions), Cumella generally goes for a more interactive experience.

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-Event Passed-

from CityLimits.org:

April 29 @ 11:00 am5:00 pm

South Street Seaport Museum celebrates its 50th Anniversary

The South Street Seaport Museum, situated in the original port that built New York into the city it is today, will celebrate fifty years this year! The Seaport Museum invites the city to join in the celebration of this important milestone, which will be recognized over an entire year (April 2017-April 2018) of special programming and exhibitions. …

April 2017 marks fifty years since the Museum received its charter from the New York State Department of Education Board of Regents. Over that fifty years the Museum has grown dramatically, collecting artifacts and works of art documenting the rise of New York as a port city.; developing and implementing innovative and award-winning programming; mounting exhibitions; and preserving a fleet of historic ships on the East River. Despite three massive setbacks: the 9/11 attacks, the Great Recession of 2008, and the floodwaters of hurricane Sandy, the museum is growing once again. With support from New York City and a dedicated group of staff, volunteers, members and friends, the Seaport Museum remains an educational and cultural gem in lower Manhattan.

The Seaport Museum’s 50th anniversary will be marked throughout the year with the opening of new exhibitions, including Millions: Migrants and Millionaires aboard the Great Liners, 1900-1914 (opening June 2017), artistic and musical performances, lectures and book talks, walking tours, and a formal 50th anniversary cocktail reception aboard the 1885 ship Wavertree in September.

Capt. Jonathan Boulware, Executive Director of the Museum, spoke enthusiastically about the anniversary. “It’s a great privilege to celebrate the five-decade life of this vital institution. We’re here in the original fabric of old New York, the ships, the piers, the 19th-century buildings. It’s the history of New York, but the topics we cover are still highly relevant today. The original values that made New York what it is, the Dutch values of trade and tolerance, the New York values of immigration, of multiculturalism, and of ambition, these all touch on urgent issues of New York and America today. Indeed, as we celebrate this important anniversary, we’re also celebrating the very best of New York values, past, present, and future.”

A brief history of the Seaport Museum:
The Museum proper is housed several buildings known collectively as Schermerhorn Row, but when completed in 1812, Schermerhorn Row was, in many respects, the city’s first world trade center. The Row housed a series of counting houses where merchants bought and sold coffee, tea, cotton, molasses, and countless other trade goods from around the world. South Street was nicknamed ‘the Street of Ships’ for the countless sailing ships that docked there, linking the city with some of the most important centers of trade in Europe, the Caribbean, South America, California, and China. The commercial activity along South Street had by the mid-nineteenth century transformed New York from a former British colonial outpost, into the largest city in the United States that controlled half the country’s trade.

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From Veranda Magazine:

Aaron Burr’s West Village Home Is for Sale

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From the e-mail newsletter of Live-In Theater Interactive Experiences New York:

April is here, and we have a gift for you. Not only will you get three different murder mystery adventures, each with an open bar, but you’ll get a 20% discount. At checkout, just enter the promo code 20SPRING after you enter your name and email address.
Go get ’em, detective.
Some of their productions:
Two siblings dead, and the air rife with foul play. Travel back to the seedy underbelly of Five Points and seek out justice in this Live In Theater classic.

The Lombardi Case: 1975

A high profile murder in a drug riddled squat in the Lower East Side. Watch out for your friends as you navigate a world of sex, drugs, and violence.

Fierce & Deadly: 1988

Inspired by actual events. A party, a memorial, and a mystery. Guests will join a marginalized community as they celebrate the life of one of their fallen sisters.

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Neighborhood Movie Nights 2016-2017

Every month, 7-9pm; doors open at 6:30pm
St. Paul’s Chapel (Broadway and Fulton Street)
You’re invited to take a cinematic stroll down New York’s memory lane at St. Paul’s Chapel, which is celebrating its 250th anniversary on October 30. Each movie will be accompanied by a brief talk about New York and St. Paul’s Chapel during the time period of the monthly featured film.
Admission and snacks are free.  Films are suitable for general audiences – most are rated PG13.

Friday, October 28: The Cameraman (1928)

Friday, November 18: Mr. Deeds Goes to Town (1936)

Friday, December 16: Remember the Night (1940)

Friday, January 27: Funny Face (1957)

Friday, February 24: The Odd Couple (1968)

Friday, March 24: Love Story (1970)

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