Category:

Architecture

April 2017 marks fifty years since the
Museum received its charter from the New
York State Department of Education Board of
Regents. Over that fifty years the Museum has
grown dramatically, collecting artifacts and
works of art documenting the rise of New York
as a port city.; developing and implementing
innovative and award-winning programming;
mounting exhibitions; and preserving a fleet of
historic ships on the East River. Despite three
massive setbacks: the 9/11 attacks, the Great
Recession of 2008, and the floodwaters of hurri-
cane Sandy, the museum is growing once again.
With support from New York City and a dedi-
cated group of staff, volunteers, members and
friends, the Seaport Museum remains an edu-
cational and cultural gem in lower Manhattan.
The Seaport Museum’s 50th anniversary will
be marked throughout the year with the open-
ing of new exhibitions, including Millions:
Migrants and Millionaires aboard the Great
Liners, 1900-1914 (opening June 2017), artistic
and musical performances, lectures and book
talks, walking tours, and a formal 50th anni-
versary cocktail reception aboard the 1885 ship
Wavertree in September. #

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From The New York Post:

Bronx Community College removes Confederate busts

The busts of two Confederate generals have been swiftly removed from Bronx Community College amid a national conversation about the relics — but the school left the bust of one racist scientist in place, The Post has learned.

In a purge for which various officials took credit, the monuments to Confederate leaders Robert E. Lee and Stonewall Jackson unceremoniously disappeared from an open-air sculpture gallery overnight Thursday.

Bronx Borough President Ruben Diaz Jr. has called the presence of Confederate icons in his borough “especially galling,” leading Gov. Cuomo to say they had to go “because New York stands against racism.”College President Thomas Isekenegbe also pledged to replace the busts with other historical figures that would help create a “space where all people feel respected, welcomed, and valued.”

In their rush to remove Confederates and sanitize the school’s “Hall of Fame for Great Americans,” officials left the bronze bust of the racist, 19th-century scientist Louis Agassiz.

The Swiss-born paleontologist landed a professorship at Harvard following a wildly successful American lecture tour in 1846, and he was ­instrumental in establishing the Ivy League school’s Museum of Comparative Zoology, the first publicly funded science building in North America.

Agassiz was the country’s most famous scientist when he died in 1873, but his reputation eventually suffered because of what the University of California Museum of Paleontology calls “his racist attitudes, which were extreme even for his day.”

“Agassiz could not accept that all groups of humans belonged to the same species, and he argued vehemently for the inferiority of non-white human groups,” according to the museum’s Web site.

The move came amid continuing outrage over the deadly violence that erupted at a rally of white supremacists who gathered in Charlottesville, Va., last Saturday to protest the planned removal of a Lee statue.

“That’s pretty f–ked up. We are all people. We bleed the same color,” said Daniel Roman, 20, who was passing through the college campus Friday evening. “Especially with what’s going on in the South, he can go f- -k himself. I’m all about equality.”

 

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Island Historical Tour (North)

Thursday, September 7, 2017

6:00 p.m.7:30 p.m.

This event repeats on the 1st Thursday of every 2 months between 5/4/2017 and 9/7/2017.

Did you know that the Randall’s Island was once three separate land masses? The island has a rich and unique history. Come learn more about the influential people, the bridges, and the landscape changes that transformed the Randall’s Island into the beautiful park it is today!

Location

Randall’s Island Connector in Randall’s Island Park
Manhattan

Directions to this location

Cost

Free

Event Organizer

Randall’s Island

Contact Number

(212) 860-1899

Contact Email

info@randallsisland.org

Categories

Education, Nature, History, Tours, Waterfront

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Date

Sep 6, 2017 • 7:00 PM – 9:00 PM

Cost

FREE and OPEN TO THE PUBLIC!

Location

Gallery at BRIC House

647 Fulton Street
(Enter on Rockwell Place)
Brooklyn, NY 11217

United States
Get Directions

Sergio Purtell, courtesy of the artist and Art 3 Gallery, Brooklyn

JOIN US FOR THE OPENING RECEPTION!

EXHIBITION ON VIEW: September 7 – October 29, 2017

CURATED BY: Elizabeth Ferrer

 

Brooklyn Photographs brings together the work of 11 photographers who have turned their lens on the Brooklyn experience from the late 1960s to the present.  Each of these photographers will present a body of work on a specific theme – childhood in Williamsburg in the 1960s, Halloween in the 1970s, or Bushwick street life in the 1980s, to name a few.  More recent work from the last decade will explore such subjects as the rapidly gentrifying post-industrial landscape, Brooklyn artists, and the microcosm of street life visible near BRIC’s facility at the intersection of Fulton and Flatbush.  In sum, the exhibition will illuminate the important role that photography has had in preserving aspects of Brooklyn’s neighborhoods and traditions, and in documenting the extraordinary cultural and social diversity that is a hallmark of the borough.  It will also reflect the borough as a site of continual change. Neighborhoods transform and new populations emerge, while the essence of Brooklyn’s humanity remains. The exhibition will be accompanied by a catalogue and by public programs.

Photographers include: Yolanda Andrade, Stefanie Apple, Nelson Bakerman, Leigh Davis, Max Kozloff, George Malave, Meryl Meisler, Patrick D. Pagnano, Sergio Purtell, Larry Racioppo, and Russell Frederick .

READ ABOUT THE EXHIBITION IN THE NEW YORK TIMES LENS BLOG >>

Special thanks to Duggal Visual Solutions, Griffin Editions, and Pranayama Art for their services in relation to this exhibition.

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https://www.facebook.com/TheLostVillage2017/

I came by this information in a paper insert that was in my program for the opening reception of “Storefronts: Oral History & Photo Exhibition”:
“The Lost Village” is a stunning indictment of the corporate take-over of Greenwich Village…made possible by complicit…politicians…the bohemian, artistic world which gave the area its colorful, distinctive flavor has fled…former mom and pop shops closed. The Village is a microcosm of what is happening across the United States where the disparity of income between rich and poor is now higher than at any time in our history. This extraordinary documentary raises the alarm and…offers a way to counter such take-overs through citizen activism…A must see.” James Cass Rogers
Two upcoming Screenings-in what’s left of the Village:
SEP 7
Thu 7 PM · Jefferson Market Library · New York
SEP 10
Sun 7 PM · Judson Memorial Church – New York City · New York
Film

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Thu 08 2017 , by

Bygone Stables

From The New York Post:

The fascinating history behind NYC’s stables-turned-real estate

Washington Mews, a little alley north of Washington Square Park, is an urban gem. Still paved with Belgian block and lined with quaint cottages, it’s a Greenwich Village street that might as well be in Europe. In fact, cities like London and Paris are filled with these tiny picturesque thoroughfares, whose cute little homes once stabled horses, carriages and sleighs.

Due to quirks in New York’s history and design, these mews are exceedingly rare in the city, making carriage-house living both scarce and coveted. Often disguised behind modest, original facades, many converted carriage homes contain architectural wonders hidden from view.

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Washington Mews: One of Manhattan’s rare alleys lined with former stables, this stretch was designed to service a row of 1830s homes along Washington Square Park.Annie Wermiel/NY Post

Take investor David Aldea’s home at 23 Cornelia St., which Taylor Swift rented in 2016. The 5,500-square-foot West Village pad was asking $40,000/month then, and is on the market with Corcoran for $24.5 million. Walking down the street, the home’s massive, arched wooden doors hint at its 1912 carriage house origins, but the unprepossessing facade might not stop passersby in their tracks.

Upon entering, however, it’s clear this is no ordinary stable: today, the garden level is graced by a 25-foot swimming pool, while an ornate Murano glass chandelier hangs from double-height ceilings. But, as Aldea notes, despite these modern touches, original details abound, particularly in the living room, where there are “24-inch square windows that would have been for the horses to stick their heads out for ventilation.”

Considering the fact that New York was a horse-and-carriage town for so many centuries, it’s surprising that there aren’t more such conversions. That’s in part because most remnants of the city’s colonial days are long gone. Also, Manhattan’s populated areas used to be far more compact; their borders barely extended north of today’s City Hall until the 1820s. The majority of New Yorkers, it seems, walked almost everywhere nearly two centuries ago.

A new street layout in the first decades of the 19th century helped the city expand, and travel by private carriage became more common — but only for the city’s elite. So few New Yorkers could afford to maintain a horse that when a commission laid out the city’s famous grid in 1811, the plan purposely excluded rear alleys for stables. Even by the Civil War, a mere 3 percent of NYC residents owned their own horses and carriages.

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Annie Wermiel/NY Post

A few early mews still exist. Take Washington Mews, which was erected behind the stately homes of “The Row,” one of New York’s first planned “terraces” of homes — a clear sign that the 1832-built Washington Square townhouses were only for the well-heeled.

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From silive.com:

Developer files plans to build on site of 90-year-old Staten Island church

This 1983 photo from the Advance archives shows the original Holy Rosary R.C. Church and adjacent rectory on Sand Lane in South Beach. A developer has filed plans to demolish the church and rectory and build eight semi- attached homes on the property. (Staten Island Advance)
This 1983 photo from the Advance archives shows the original Holy Rosary R.C. Church and adjacent rectory on Sand Lane in South Beach. A developer has filed plans to demolish the church and rectory and build eight semi- attached homes on the property. (Staten Island Advance)
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STATEN ISLAND, N.Y. — A Staten Island developer has filed plans to build eight semi-attached homes on the site of the original Holy Rosary R.C. Church in South Beach.

According to Building Department records, Mitchell Pacifico, a principal of Mp Realty Holding Corp., Travis, who is listed as owner, plans to build eight semi-attached homes over four 45 x 100 lots on Sand Lane.

The lots would be sub-divided from the original parcel at 207 Sand Lane, and the church and adjacent rectory on the site demolished.

Pacifico said he bid on the property after seeing it for sale on the Multiple Listing Service (MLS). He would not disclose the amount, but public records indicate the property sold for $1.5 million.

The new construction would be marketed as Sand Lane Estates. Peter Calvanico, of Calvanico Associates, Willowbrook, is listed as the architect for the project.

Pacifico described the project as “high end” three-bedroom semi-attached homes, with full basements, each with a living room, dining room and eat-in-kitchen. He said construction could begin by early spring.

The 90-year-old stucco and wood-frame church, built by hand by Italian immigrants, is located two blocks from the Franklin Delano Roosevelt Boardwalk in South Beach. It served as a neighborhood mobilization center during Hurricane Sandy in 2012, but has not been used for mass since 2015, according to the Rev. Michael Martine, pastor of Holy Rosary.

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According to the pastor, the church suffered heavy water damage in March 2016 when the original pipes burst, causing water to damage the ceiling and walls. The building was deemed irreparable.

Father Martine said the proceeds from the sale “will greatly improve the financial position of our parish.” He said the money would go toward retiring the debt the parish incurred with the building of the new Holy Rosary Church, at 120 Jerome Ave., in the early 1990s, as well as the Father Dominic Epifano Parish Center across the street, that was built a few years later, in early 2000s. A new boiler will also be purchased for the adjacent Holy Rosary School, which was built in the 1950s.

Holy Rosary has preserved and restored an original hand-carved wooden crucifix as well as a fresco painting that was displayed over the altar in the Sand Lane church. Both are now in the daily mass chapel of the Jerome Avenue church.

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From “off the Grid”, website of the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation:

The Glittering and Gritty History of 24 Bond

If you happen to look up while strolling down Bond or Lafayette Streets, you might come upon a curious sight – dozens of small, golden statues dancing along the wrought iron and brick of a traditional NoHo facade. Celebratory and airy, they’re a delightful addition to the heavy, industrial look of the rest of the area. Who do we have to thank for this artistic juxtaposition? Artist and 24 Bond resident Bruce Williams.

Williams and his wife have lived in the building for over twenty years, and he first began adorning his building’s facade in 1998. At the time, the NoHo neighborhood was much more off the beaten path than now, a small enclave for artists working in a variety of mediums. Since then, the neighborhood has gained quite a bit more distinction, glamour, and recognition. In 2008, 24 Bond Street was included in the NoHo Historic District Extension, officially recognizing the architectural significance of this 19th-century building. To celebrate, Williams added additional golden sculptures climbing up the side of his now-landmarked building. He did this, as he had always done, without asking for approval, but the new landmark status of his building required that he confer with the LPC. Despite a small ado requiring an official hearing on the outdoor art, the spritely statues were permitted to stay.

But those sculptures aren’t the only piece of artistic legacy at 24 Bond. Robert Mapplethorpe occupied a studio on the fifth floor of 24 Bond from the 1970s until his death in 1989. In this cavernous space, Mapplethorpe would invite his subjects to “do drugs, have sex, and then be photographed.” 24 Bond was infamous – Edward Mapplethorpe, Robert’s brother, said it was “so sexually charged that you needed to be pretty certain of who you were to be around it on a day-to-day basis.” Mapplethorpe photographed legions of downtown superstars in his NoHo loft, including frequent collaborator Patti Smith. It was here that they filmed 1978’s “Still Moving” which appeared at the Stephen Miller Gallery and was Smith and Mapplethorpe’s only joint exhibition.

Patti Smith, taken by Robert Mapplethorpe. It is believed that this photo is taken on Mapplethorpe’s 5th floor studio at 24 Bond.

The same year that Mapplethorpe died, the Gene Frankel Theatre moved into the ground floor of the Bond Street building. Already a well-regarded theater with serious Village bonafides, once at 24 Bond the theater nurtured the careers of burgeoning actors and exhibited bold and progressive works. Although Frankel himself died in 2005, the theater still operates out of the ground floor space, advancing its mission to nurture living playwrights and artists and to “revive NoHo as a cauldron of LGBTQI art and ideas by producing new works.”

Considering the building’s long legacy as an arts space, those gold dancers on the facade seem to fit right in.

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In their special section “Summer Fun in Staten Island,” published on June 28, 2017, the New York Daily News said that our monthly Sea Shanty Sessions, led by the Folk Music Society of New York, offer “…a great opportunity to experience authentic, time-honored maritime songs in an appropriately historic setting.” The next session is this Sunday, August 20, from 2 to 5 PM. This even is family friendly and free, but we always appreciate your donations. #NYCulture

Image may contain: 8 people, people smiling

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Capturing the Lower East Side’s Disappearing Mom-and-Pop Storefronts, a photography and oral history exhibition, opens tonight, 6pm, at Theater For The New City Gallery, 155 1st Ave [10th]. It’s curated by James and Karla Murray, the husband-and-wife photography team that have documented so many mom-and pop-storefronts, compiled in their books Store Front: The Disappearing Face of New York and its followup.

The show is intended to raise awareness of the essential NYC character that these businesses embody, threatened by skyrocketing rents. You’ll see the work of 30 photographers who participated in two workshops in April and June with the Murrays focusing on neighborhood stores. Since the workshops took place, two of the stores photographed by participants have closed.

The event is free and there will be complimentary wine and beer, as well as small bites, provided by local indie merchants, of course.…

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