Category:

Architecture

From the Fraunces Tavern Museum website:

Washington’s Farewell

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  • To commemorate Washington’s emotional farewell to his Officers that took place in the Long Room on December 4, 1783, a special reenactment of the farewell will occur throughout the day in the famous Long Room.

    This year we are thrilled to announce that actor Ian Kahn, who portrayed George Washington on the hit AMC series TURN,will be at the Museum to reprise his role and reenact the toast given by George Washington in Fraunces Tavern’s historic Long Room on December 4, 1783. Joining Ian to reenact the toast will be Dan Shippey, a George Washington reenactor and expert from the Breed’s Hill Institute who served as Ian’s mentor and inspiration during his time working on the show. Come and witness the toast, interact with “George,” and talk with Ian about his life-changing experience playing the General on TV.

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    Visitors will enjoy $1 admission for this exciting day of events; which will also include additional tours and activities throughout the day; such as a colonial costume photobooth, and hands-on family activities.

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From The Fraunces Tavern Museum website:

 

Presented by Robert Watson

Moored off the coast of Brooklyn until the end of the war, the derelict ship, the HMS Jersey, was a living hell for thousands of Americans either captured by the British or accused of disloyalty. Throughout the colonies, the mere mention of the ship sparked fear and loathing of British troops. Join Robert as he explores the long forgotten story of the bloodiest “battle” of the Revolution, when an old British prison ship claimed more American lives than were lost in combat during the entirety of the War and how the affair would help rally the cause and win the War.

Tickets for this event go on sale October 13*All attendees must purchase a ticket for Special Lectures. There is no reserved seating for this lecture. 

Tickets can be purchased online or at the door.
For tickets purchased online, you will receive a confirmation email from Fraunces Tavern Museum with further event details within 24 business hours.

Purchase Tickets:

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The page, http://www.vintag.es/2015/11/rarely-seen-autochrome-photos-of-new.html , claims to display

Rarely Seen Autochrome Photos of New York in the Early 20th Century .

The images themselves span 18 years, from the earliest one dated with the year 1900, to the last, a photo of buildings with banners and signs exhorting the public to buy war bonds, with the date given as 1918. Not all of them are from New York City, several are attributed to places in Upstate New York. Though they are lovely to look at, and a few provide a glimpse of what everyday life for everyday people looked like in the thick of NYC, some people who have written into the comments section have revealed that the provenance of the images is not in all cases what the site represented them to be: some are not genuine Autochrome images at all, but colorized photos or lantern slides, and the one of two men playing chess was reportedly taken in Germany, not New York. Here are the comments, correcting some of the attributions of the images:

Some of these are not original autochromes but colorised black and white photos, e.g. the couple in Saratoga Springs, which is a detail from a colorisation by Sanna Dullaway: http://sannadullaway.com/0r…

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A number of critical errors. Image #1 (from the top down) is not an autochrome. Images #2 & 3 are autochromes by Charles Zoller (Rochester, NY). Image #4 is not an autochrome. Image #5 ( Foolish House) is an autochrome by Zoller. Images 6, 7, 8, & 9 are not autochromes. Image #10 (rooftops) is an autochrome in the collection of Wm. B. Becker and should be credited to him. Images 11, 12, 13, & 14 are by Zoller. All the Zoller autochromes are owned by the George Eastman Museum and should be credited to them. Image # 15 (chess players) is probably by Alfred Stieglitz or possibly by Edward Steichen and was taken in Germany. The last image (war bond rally) is an autochrome by J. D. Willis from the collection of Mark Jacobs.
Nearly all the non-autochrome images identified in this post are actually black & white lantern slides that have been digitally colored

 

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    Right! 6-7-8-9 are not color photographs at all, but Photochrom prints made from black and white negatives. You can see the originals online at the Library of Congress — the process is explained here: http://www.loc.gov/pictures…

    And if you’re interested in real Autochromes, including the rare New York rooftops image (#10 above), see the original postings online at the American Museum of Photography: http://photographymuseum.co…

 

 

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Thursday Oct 19, 2017
7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

POWERHOUSE @ the Archway
28 Adams Street (Corner of Adams & Water Street @ the Archway)
Brooklyn , NY 11201

powerHouse Book Launch: STREET: New York City – 70s, 80s, 90s by Carrie Boretz — in conversation w/ Mark Bussell

 

RSVP appreciated:

Please fill out the “Bookings” form at the bottom of this page.

-or-

Send the name of the event and number of attendees to our RSVP email.
*Disregard the notification that will appear after Booking.*

PLEASE NOTE: Submitting an RSVP for this event DOES NOT guarantee entrance. This is a free-access event — entrance will be on a first-come, first-served basis.


 

About the Book:

The photographs in Street were taken by Carrie Boretz in New York City from the mid 1970s through the 1990s. It is common knowledge that the city was on rocky ground for many of those years but these are not pictures filled with drama or strife. Instead Boretz was always more interested in the subtle and familiar moments of everyday life in the various neighborhoods where she lived, before much of the graffiti was scrubbed away and the city sanitized and reborn to what it has since become.

For so many living in and visiting New York today, it is forgotten or altogether not known how different so many parts of the city were during that time. Many of these pictures show the reality of the streets then, where every day workers, the homeless, the affluent, and tourists all shared the common space, providing examples of how one of the greatest cities in the world was one often filled with contradictions. But there is also a timeless element to these images as children still play in the parks, streets, and schoolyards, commuters still face the elements daily as they wait, there are still regular demonstrations and parades, and the whole spectrum of the joys and pitfalls of humanity are still visible most anywhere a person looks.

For Boretz nothing was scripted, it all played out right before her. As Patti Smith said, “You need no rationale, no schooling. It’s love at first sight. You see something and you have to capture it. Instinctive, bang, you feel one with it.” Indeed, Boretz doesn’t have a philosophy about shooting other than trusting her instinct: she saw, she shot, she moved on, always looking for moments that made her heart beat faster. It was the continual rush of knowing that at any time she could come upon something real and beautiful. That is why and how she shot and why and how her Street is so special.

 

About the Photographer:

After graduating in 1975 from Washington University in St. Louis Carrie Boretz began her life as a New York City photographer a week later, landing an internship at the Village Voice. Over the next decade she photographed for The New York Times MagazineNew YorkSports Illustrated, People, Fortune, and Life. By the 1990s she was shooting almost daily for the New York Times‘s “Day” beat, one picture that revealed a slice of the city on that particular day.…

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With the New York Adventure Club:

Behind-the-Scenes @ Woodlawn Cemetery & Locked Gilded Age Family Mausoleums

Step inside some of the country’s most opulent family mausoleums that are rarely unlocked for the public, until now.

Join New York Adventure Club for an exclusive, behind-the-scenes experience at Woodlawn Cemetery, one of the largest cemeteries in New York City covering more than 400 acres and serving as the resting place for more than 300,000 people.

Sat. Oct. 21: 3pm-5pm

Woodlawn Conservancy

3800 Jerome Avenue

Bronx, NY 10467

Led by a cemetery docent, our unique experience will include:

 

  • The history and story of Woodlawn Cemetery, and how it became the favored cemetery of so many prominent NYC families from the late 1800s to early 1900s
  • An exploration of the cemetery’s grounds to see some of its most notable mausoleums, sculptures, and landscapes
  • Exclusive access inside some of its most impressive Gilded Age family mausoleums including Harkness, Harbeck, and Dunlop, which contain Tiffany glass, Italian marble, and even a dead parrot

 

Click here to see pictures from one of our last trips to Woodlawn Cemetery!

* Please bring a good pair of walking shoes since we’ll be on our feet for the entirety of the tour!

 


 

Disclaimer

By attending a New York Adventure Club experience, you accept our terms of service.

Categories: Tours, Active, Historic Sites

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From Thought Gallery NYC:
After the city’s Halloween festivities come to an end, New Yorkers will still be able to get a look at the city’s haunted histories at New York: City of the Dead on November 9, which offers an overview of the city’s cemeteries – including the secret ones hidden in some unlikely places.…

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From Thought Gallery NYC:
New Yorkers can get out to Queens this fall for walks exploring Steinway Village (November 18) or Richmond Hill North (November 11), a Victorian village that was one of the first suburban communities. The Municipal Art Society will also offer a tour of the South Bronx and its history and recent revival on November 19.…

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Lower Manhattan is where the Dutch settled, George Washington was inaugurated, and Alexander Hamilton has his final resting place. Learn about the history of the area on a Lower Manhattan History Walk on October 21…  To learn about the area’s seedier underbelly, catch the history of crime in NYC on October 21. A separate walking tour on October 28 will put Wall Street and great financial crashes at the forefront.…

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A few blocks uptown, head to the Lower East Side on October 22 for a look at the Jewish gangsters who once trafficked in the area, including Arnold Rothstein, Meir Lansky and Bugsy Siegel. To the west, New Yorkers can discover the West Village on a walking tour exploring the area’s history, ecology, and architecture on October 17.…

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