Category:

Art and Music

From The New York Post:

Bronx Community College removes Confederate busts

The busts of two Confederate generals have been swiftly removed from Bronx Community College amid a national conversation about the relics — but the school left the bust of one racist scientist in place, The Post has learned.

In a purge for which various officials took credit, the monuments to Confederate leaders Robert E. Lee and Stonewall Jackson unceremoniously disappeared from an open-air sculpture gallery overnight Thursday.

Bronx Borough President Ruben Diaz Jr. has called the presence of Confederate icons in his borough “especially galling,” leading Gov. Cuomo to say they had to go “because New York stands against racism.”College President Thomas Isekenegbe also pledged to replace the busts with other historical figures that would help create a “space where all people feel respected, welcomed, and valued.”

In their rush to remove Confederates and sanitize the school’s “Hall of Fame for Great Americans,” officials left the bronze bust of the racist, 19th-century scientist Louis Agassiz.

The Swiss-born paleontologist landed a professorship at Harvard following a wildly successful American lecture tour in 1846, and he was ­instrumental in establishing the Ivy League school’s Museum of Comparative Zoology, the first publicly funded science building in North America.

Agassiz was the country’s most famous scientist when he died in 1873, but his reputation eventually suffered because of what the University of California Museum of Paleontology calls “his racist attitudes, which were extreme even for his day.”

“Agassiz could not accept that all groups of humans belonged to the same species, and he argued vehemently for the inferiority of non-white human groups,” according to the museum’s Web site.

The move came amid continuing outrage over the deadly violence that erupted at a rally of white supremacists who gathered in Charlottesville, Va., last Saturday to protest the planned removal of a Lee statue.

“That’s pretty f–ked up. We are all people. We bleed the same color,” said Daniel Roman, 20, who was passing through the college campus Friday evening. “Especially with what’s going on in the South, he can go f- -k himself. I’m all about equality.”

 

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Date

Sep 6, 2017 • 7:00 PM – 9:00 PM

Cost

FREE and OPEN TO THE PUBLIC!

Location

Gallery at BRIC House

647 Fulton Street
(Enter on Rockwell Place)
Brooklyn, NY 11217

United States
Get Directions

Sergio Purtell, courtesy of the artist and Art 3 Gallery, Brooklyn

JOIN US FOR THE OPENING RECEPTION!

EXHIBITION ON VIEW: September 7 – October 29, 2017

CURATED BY: Elizabeth Ferrer

 

Brooklyn Photographs brings together the work of 11 photographers who have turned their lens on the Brooklyn experience from the late 1960s to the present.  Each of these photographers will present a body of work on a specific theme – childhood in Williamsburg in the 1960s, Halloween in the 1970s, or Bushwick street life in the 1980s, to name a few.  More recent work from the last decade will explore such subjects as the rapidly gentrifying post-industrial landscape, Brooklyn artists, and the microcosm of street life visible near BRIC’s facility at the intersection of Fulton and Flatbush.  In sum, the exhibition will illuminate the important role that photography has had in preserving aspects of Brooklyn’s neighborhoods and traditions, and in documenting the extraordinary cultural and social diversity that is a hallmark of the borough.  It will also reflect the borough as a site of continual change. Neighborhoods transform and new populations emerge, while the essence of Brooklyn’s humanity remains. The exhibition will be accompanied by a catalogue and by public programs.

Photographers include: Yolanda Andrade, Stefanie Apple, Nelson Bakerman, Leigh Davis, Max Kozloff, George Malave, Meryl Meisler, Patrick D. Pagnano, Sergio Purtell, Larry Racioppo, and Russell Frederick .

READ ABOUT THE EXHIBITION IN THE NEW YORK TIMES LENS BLOG >>

Special thanks to Duggal Visual Solutions, Griffin Editions, and Pranayama Art for their services in relation to this exhibition.

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A facebook posting from HB West:

Did you know: In 1968, Twyla Tharp created a dance in the gymnasium of Wagner College? It was called “Generation” and featured a young Sara Rudner and Ms. Tharp herself, among the cast. Lighting by Jennifer Tipton. #StatenIslandDanceHistory #StatenIslandDanceProject #oralhistories

Generation consists of five simultaneous solos, each dancer in her own separate orbit. The dynamic ebbs and wanes as the movement changes tempo and quality; actions build until the dancers are moving so fast or so slow that the integrity of the original phrases disintegrates.
twylatharp.org

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https://www.facebook.com/TheLostVillage2017/

I came by this information in a paper insert that was in my program for the opening reception of “Storefronts: Oral History & Photo Exhibition”:
“The Lost Village” is a stunning indictment of the corporate take-over of Greenwich Village…made possible by complicit…politicians…the bohemian, artistic world which gave the area its colorful, distinctive flavor has fled…former mom and pop shops closed. The Village is a microcosm of what is happening across the United States where the disparity of income between rich and poor is now higher than at any time in our history. This extraordinary documentary raises the alarm and…offers a way to counter such take-overs through citizen activism…A must see.” James Cass Rogers
Two upcoming Screenings-in what’s left of the Village:
SEP 7
Thu 7 PM · Jefferson Market Library · New York
SEP 10
Sun 7 PM · Judson Memorial Church – New York City · New York
Film

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Howl Happening Opening Night Sept. 10th

Sep. 10 – Oct. 06, 2017
56 Bleecker Gallery and Late 80s New York
Presented by Some Serious Business
and Howl! Happening: An Arturo Vega Project

Lust of glory pricked their hearts up, dread of shame
Struck them tame;
And that glory and that shame alike, the gold
Bought and sold.
-Robert Browning, Love Among The Ruins

Let’s also say that change is neither good or bad. It simply is. It can be greeted with terror or joy. A tantrum that says, ‘I want it the way it was’ or a dance that says, ‘Look, it’s something new.’
–Don Draper, Mad Men (AMC)

Some Serious Business and Howl! Happening are pleased to present Love Among The Ruins, co-curated by Susan Martin, founding director of Some Serious Business; Bill Stelling, 56 Bleecker gallery director and founder of the groundbreaking FUN Gallery with Patti Astor; and artist Maynard Monrow. All three curators were close friends of Dean Rolston, co-owner of 56 Bleecker who serves as inspiration for the exhibition.

Artists in this retrospective include:
Austė, Suzanne Anker, Donald Baechler, Sylvie Ball, Jean-Michel Basquiat, Julian Beck, Bill Beckley, Mike Berg, John Bowman, Jeff Carpenter, Stefano Castronovo, George Condo, Arch Connelly, Bruce Conner, Scott Covert, Ingrid Dinter, Arnold Fern, Vincent Gallo, Graham Gillmore, Allen Ginsberg, Nan Goldin, Eric Goode, Robert Hawkins, Roberto Juarez, Scott Kilgour, Ruth Kligman, Norman Korpi, Joyce Kozloff, Tseng Kwong Chi, David LaChapelle, Greer Lankton, Claire Lieberman, Daniel Mahoney, Frank Majore, Fidel Márquez, Sylvia Martins, McDermott & McGough, Taylor Mead, Nicholas Mouffarrege, David Nelson, Felix Pène du Bois, Jeff Perrone, Elizabeth Peyton, William Rand, Elaine Reicheck, Rene Ricard, Bill Rice, Alexis Rockman, Nicolas Rule, Vittorio Scarpati, Bruno Schmidt, Jo Shane, Mark Sink, Stephen Sprouse, Ken Tisa, Noel Vietor, William Wegman, Dondi White, Martin Wong, Thomas Woodruff, and Jimmy Wright.

56 Bleecker Gallery held a unique position in the late 80’s art world. Part serious gallery, part happening, the space was a scene that reflected the explosive intersection of art, performance, music, fashion and the incredible nightlife culture of that era.

Featuring many of the most cutting edge artists of the time, such as Stephen Sprouse and David LaChapelle, it also presented rigorously serious shows of artists like Bruce Conner and Elaine Reichek. The space was a forum for nightclub impresario Eric Goode to produce an installation that was a window into his future endeavors. Taylor Mead directed the gallery’s historic performance of Jackie Curtis’ Glamour, Glory and Gold featuring legendary actors Ondine, John Heys, Penny Arcade, Harry Koutoukas and Margot Howard-Howard.

56 Bleecker was a ‘scene’ as much as a venue for art. Openings featured guests as diverse as Stavros Niarchos, Richard Gere, Lauren Hutton, Fab 5 Freddy and Henry Geldzahler. Rene Ricard held court in the famous ‘Tin Room,’ anointing those in favor and banishing his enemies to NoHo Star.

While it was a time of enormous creativity, it was also one of deep sorrow. The exhibition will touch upon the impact of AIDS on our community.

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Thu 08 2017 , by

Bygone Stables

From The New York Post:

The fascinating history behind NYC’s stables-turned-real estate

Washington Mews, a little alley north of Washington Square Park, is an urban gem. Still paved with Belgian block and lined with quaint cottages, it’s a Greenwich Village street that might as well be in Europe. In fact, cities like London and Paris are filled with these tiny picturesque thoroughfares, whose cute little homes once stabled horses, carriages and sleighs.

Due to quirks in New York’s history and design, these mews are exceedingly rare in the city, making carriage-house living both scarce and coveted. Often disguised behind modest, original facades, many converted carriage homes contain architectural wonders hidden from view.

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Washington Mews: One of Manhattan’s rare alleys lined with former stables, this stretch was designed to service a row of 1830s homes along Washington Square Park.Annie Wermiel/NY Post

Take investor David Aldea’s home at 23 Cornelia St., which Taylor Swift rented in 2016. The 5,500-square-foot West Village pad was asking $40,000/month then, and is on the market with Corcoran for $24.5 million. Walking down the street, the home’s massive, arched wooden doors hint at its 1912 carriage house origins, but the unprepossessing facade might not stop passersby in their tracks.

Upon entering, however, it’s clear this is no ordinary stable: today, the garden level is graced by a 25-foot swimming pool, while an ornate Murano glass chandelier hangs from double-height ceilings. But, as Aldea notes, despite these modern touches, original details abound, particularly in the living room, where there are “24-inch square windows that would have been for the horses to stick their heads out for ventilation.”

Considering the fact that New York was a horse-and-carriage town for so many centuries, it’s surprising that there aren’t more such conversions. That’s in part because most remnants of the city’s colonial days are long gone. Also, Manhattan’s populated areas used to be far more compact; their borders barely extended north of today’s City Hall until the 1820s. The majority of New Yorkers, it seems, walked almost everywhere nearly two centuries ago.

A new street layout in the first decades of the 19th century helped the city expand, and travel by private carriage became more common — but only for the city’s elite. So few New Yorkers could afford to maintain a horse that when a commission laid out the city’s famous grid in 1811, the plan purposely excluded rear alleys for stables. Even by the Civil War, a mere 3 percent of NYC residents owned their own horses and carriages.

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Annie Wermiel/NY Post

A few early mews still exist. Take Washington Mews, which was erected behind the stately homes of “The Row,” one of New York’s first planned “terraces” of homes — a clear sign that the 1832-built Washington Square townhouses were only for the well-heeled.

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From “off the Grid”, website of the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation:

The Glittering and Gritty History of 24 Bond

If you happen to look up while strolling down Bond or Lafayette Streets, you might come upon a curious sight – dozens of small, golden statues dancing along the wrought iron and brick of a traditional NoHo facade. Celebratory and airy, they’re a delightful addition to the heavy, industrial look of the rest of the area. Who do we have to thank for this artistic juxtaposition? Artist and 24 Bond resident Bruce Williams.

Williams and his wife have lived in the building for over twenty years, and he first began adorning his building’s facade in 1998. At the time, the NoHo neighborhood was much more off the beaten path than now, a small enclave for artists working in a variety of mediums. Since then, the neighborhood has gained quite a bit more distinction, glamour, and recognition. In 2008, 24 Bond Street was included in the NoHo Historic District Extension, officially recognizing the architectural significance of this 19th-century building. To celebrate, Williams added additional golden sculptures climbing up the side of his now-landmarked building. He did this, as he had always done, without asking for approval, but the new landmark status of his building required that he confer with the LPC. Despite a small ado requiring an official hearing on the outdoor art, the spritely statues were permitted to stay.

But those sculptures aren’t the only piece of artistic legacy at 24 Bond. Robert Mapplethorpe occupied a studio on the fifth floor of 24 Bond from the 1970s until his death in 1989. In this cavernous space, Mapplethorpe would invite his subjects to “do drugs, have sex, and then be photographed.” 24 Bond was infamous – Edward Mapplethorpe, Robert’s brother, said it was “so sexually charged that you needed to be pretty certain of who you were to be around it on a day-to-day basis.” Mapplethorpe photographed legions of downtown superstars in his NoHo loft, including frequent collaborator Patti Smith. It was here that they filmed 1978’s “Still Moving” which appeared at the Stephen Miller Gallery and was Smith and Mapplethorpe’s only joint exhibition.

Patti Smith, taken by Robert Mapplethorpe. It is believed that this photo is taken on Mapplethorpe’s 5th floor studio at 24 Bond.

The same year that Mapplethorpe died, the Gene Frankel Theatre moved into the ground floor of the Bond Street building. Already a well-regarded theater with serious Village bonafides, once at 24 Bond the theater nurtured the careers of burgeoning actors and exhibited bold and progressive works. Although Frankel himself died in 2005, the theater still operates out of the ground floor space, advancing its mission to nurture living playwrights and artists and to “revive NoHo as a cauldron of LGBTQI art and ideas by producing new works.”

Considering the building’s long legacy as an arts space, those gold dancers on the facade seem to fit right in.

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In their special section “Summer Fun in Staten Island,” published on June 28, 2017, the New York Daily News said that our monthly Sea Shanty Sessions, led by the Folk Music Society of New York, offer “…a great opportunity to experience authentic, time-honored maritime songs in an appropriately historic setting.” The next session is this Sunday, August 20, from 2 to 5 PM. This even is family friendly and free, but we always appreciate your donations. #NYCulture

Image may contain: 8 people, people smiling

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From Spoiled NYC:

The Sound of Silence: A Tribute To Webster Hall

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For 131 years, Webster Hall has hosted some of the world’s biggest musical acts. Today it closes its doors– at least until it reopens under new ownership, sold in a deal worth an estimated $35 million.

The space, with a maximum capacity of 2,500 people, served as a nightclub, concert venue, corporate events space, and recording studio.

It will reopen in either 2019 or 2020 as the newly christened Spectrum Hall, its space restricted to concerts and sporting events.

I received the phone call in early May. A friend of mine told me management had served all Webster Hall employees with termination notices.

True, it had been a couple of years since I’d set foot in the venue, but a part of me heaved a pained sigh for yet another victim of the city’s changing landscape, for the many dances I’d shared with fellow miscreants who streamed into the place, their wrists ablaze with the shades of kandi bracelets and multi-colored fluffies.

I remembered the faces of the girls I kissed as vividly as I recalled those of the men I kissed– or shyly didn’t kiss. I recoiled at the memory of the crappy wage I made at the time, of the overpriced drinks, the even more overpriced water bottles, a precious commodity in a space that scorched with summer heat even in midwinter.

The people I met there ran the gamut, from frat bros with cockeyed grins, to scene kids with more gumption than me, roadsters who surveyed groups of three or more, code switching and peddling ketamine all the while.

Mirrored behavior existed on the far more spacious dance floor at Amazura Concert Hall in Queens or the even more cramped Electric Warehouse in Brooklyn, and the East Village had long given way to millennial kink, this host of music, bodies, motion, and silent exchanges in bathroom stalls.

“Webster had that old-time New York grunge that made you feel like you were part of the 19th century, in the sense that “fun” could easily involve trying to locate your stolen purse/phone,” says Michael Yates, formerly of Harlem and now living in Los Angeles.

“I’ll miss it. I’m sure the new version of the inside will look fantastic and modern and have a pleasant aroma. Old style Webster Hall was my first immersion into NYC’s EDM scene at the time. It was a place that was magical in the dark, probably because it would look awful when illuminated by sunlight.”

websterhall Having our friend @Halsey visit for an intimate show in the The Studio at Webster Hall tonight before we close for renovations in August. Stay tuned for more surprise shows leading up till then!

The venue, Yates continues, is a “perfect example” of New York City’s infrastructure.

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from The New York Times:

Photo

A plaque honoring the comedian Rodney Dangerfield, a Queens native, being installed in a garden next to the Kew Gardens station on the Long Island Rail Road. Its official unveiling is scheduled for Friday during the opening events of the Kew Gardens Festival of Cinema. Credit Will Glaser/The New York Times

As a boy growing up in Kew Gardens, Queens, Jacob Cohen got no respect.

His many menial jobs included delivering groceries to wealthy neighbors. He

endured anti-Semitism. He played baseball for a shabbily outfitted team against a team from against a team from the more celebrated Forest Hills neighborhood next door, said Carl Ballenas, a local historian.

That disadvantaged boy became Rodney Dangerfield, a stand-up comedian with a self-deprecating style based on his woeful upbringing in Kew Gardens.

Go ahead now, reader, and fidget with your imaginary necktie, mop your beleaguered brow and stammer it, the way Rodney did: No respect, no respect at all, all right?

“The whole ‘no respect’ theme came from his environment,” Mr. Ballenas said. “Kew Gardens was the birthplace, the formation of his themed monologues and catchphrase.”

Eager to confer a measure of respect upon Mr. Dangerfield and upon Kew Gardens, Mr. Ballenas and some of the students at the school where he teaches helped get a memorial plaque made to honor Mr. Dangerfield, who died in 2004 at 82.

Mr. Ballenas watched it being installed last Friday in a small green space next to the Kew Gardens station for the Long Island Rail Road. Mr. Dangerfield lived in the neighborhood with his mother and sister in an apartment above what is now Austin’s Ale House, one of the best-known bars in Queens.

As workers installed the memorial in anticipation of its formal unveiling this Friday, onlookers were eager to recall one-liners from the King of No Respect, often zingers based on uncaring parents, a poor upbringing and other aspects of a troubled life.

The plaque, which bore the comic’s youthful image from his 1939 yearbook from Richmond Hill High School, lists three of his top film appearances: “Caddyshack,” “Easy Money” and “Back to School.”

Also listed are his 1981 Grammy-winning comedy record, “No Respect,” and his 1983 hip-hop single, “Rappin’ Rodney,” which, the plaque noted, reached No. 83 on the Billboard charts.

Mr. Dangerfield was born on Long Island and lived in several New York City neighborhoods before moving with his mother and sister to Kew Gardens in the early 1930s when he was 10. He remained there throughout his teens.

His father abandoned the family and Mr. Dangerfield grew up “unloved and unwanted,” with a mother who withheld affection and kindness, said his widow, Joan Dangerfield.

“His mother convinced him to open a saving account one summer so he could save up for a football uniform,” she said, sounding like a Dangerfield joke setup. “Then she stole his money.”

Ms.…

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