Category:

Art and Music

From Atlas Obscura:

The Twilight of the Analog Photo Booth

The effort to save a rare beast on the road to extinction.

On a recent Saturday morning in New York, the analog photo booth in the Ace Hotel on 29th Street was out of order. Inside the booth, which costs $5 plus tax for a strip of four black-and-white photographs (cards accepted), a piece of paper hung askew atop the mirror, level with the sign reading “EYE LEVEL.” “Sorry, I’m broken …” it read. “I’ll be better soon. XO, Ace.” Barely a dozen of these film-based photo booths remain in the city, a fact that would have been inconceivable as recently as the 1990s.

In September 1925, the crowds stretched around the block for the first ever Photomaton studio, 30 blocks north of the present site of the Ace Hotel, at 51st Street and Broadway. Each subject paid 25 cents, was bathed in flashes of light, and waited eight minutes for a strip of eight photographs. Eighteen months later, the New York Times reported, “Young Photomaton Inventor Will Celebrate His First Million.” In today’s money, this would be close to $14 million.

Anatol Josepho, the inventor of the "Photomaton" photo booth that debuted in September 1925 at 1659 Broadway in New York City.
Anatol Josepho, the inventor of the “Photomaton” photo booth that debuted in September 1925 at 1659 Broadway in New York City. Library of Congress/LC-DIG-ggbain-25079

The inventor, Anatol Josepho, was born in 1894, and came from nothing. Josepho, né Josephowitz, grew up a banished Jew in Siberia. At 15, he went off to explore the world, starting in Berlin, where he bought a Brownie camera and learned to take photographs. Later, he took it to Budapest, to Shanghai, and eventually to New York. In Harlem, in 1925, he raised the $11,000 required to build a prototype for the first curtain-enclosed photo booth—the cost of nearly six reasonably sized houses at that time. Josepho was charming, and obsessed with the project, writes photographer Näkki Goranin. Despite being a newcomer to the city, “[he] was able to talk people into loaning him the money, find the appropriate machinists and engineers to help him build his Photomaton machine, and be sought out by the leading industrialists in America.”

Josepho stood on the shoulders of decades of tinkerers who had been flirting with this technology since the 1880s, when a craze for vending machines of all kinds, including seltzer, chocolate, and postcards, seized Europe and America. Concurrently, photographic technology was developing at a galloping pace. Some early booths offered prints for a penny, others unreliable tintypes with near-unrecognizable subjects. Throughout the 1920s, the technology was becoming more and more refined—until, in 1925, Josepho patented the booth that set the standard for the next 90 years.

Two friends pose for a picture in a photo booth, date unknown.
Two friends pose for a picture in a photo booth, date unknown. simpleinsomnia/CC BY 2.0

Before long the photo booth was everywhere: malls, bars, airports, post offices, Fred Astaire films. In the United States, they were often owned by the company PhotoMe, says Tim Garrett, an artist who co-runs the site Photobooth.Net with friend and colleague Brian Meacham.

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From The Observer

By Ann Votaw 10/20/2017

I have a soft spot for cemeteries.

Recently, I posted an Instagram photo of a crumbling headstone and got a like from Jolene Lupo, a stranger of the alive variety.

But upon closer inspection of her profile pic—a black and white of a marble-eyed brunette—I wondered if Lupo might not be a phantom.

My sleuthing revealed Lupo was not a hallucination but the tintype studio manager of Penumbra Foundation, a Manhattan nonprofit dedicated to historical photography. The more I scrolled through her feed, the more I became enchanted with tintypes—kind-of like metal Polaroids of the mid-1800s.

As the child of antique fanatics, I grew up going to flea markets. Yet I was familiar with tintypes of whiskered soldiers, not the bearded hipsters I saw on Penumbra’s accounts.

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Description

Following the trauma of the Civil War, the intersection of mourning on a national scale with the new technology of photography gave rise to a chilling phenomenon: “spirit photography,” the supposed art of capturing departed loved ones on film. Author and curator of religion at the National Museum of American History, Peter Manseau, shares the story of infamous spirit photographer William Mumler, the fraud allegations that haunted him, and a nation grasping for the promise of the afterlife.

Book Talk: The Apparitionists: A Tale of Phantoms, Fraud, Photography, and the Man Who Captured Lincoln’s Ghost
Tuesday, October 24
Doors: 6:00 pm
Event: 6:30 pm
$5 General Admission / Free for Members

BHS Members: to reserve tickets at the member price, click on “Tickets” and enter your Member ID on the following page after clicking on “Enter Promotional Code.”

Date and Time

Tue, October 24, 2017

6:30 PM – 8:00 PM EDT

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Location

Brooklyn Historical Society

128 Pierrepont St

Brooklyn, NY 11201

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REFUND POLICY Brooklyn Historical Society requires 24 hours notice before the date of the event to refund a ticket. No refunds are provided after that point. No refunds are provided on the day of the event and all subsequent days.

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Come in, come in! Enter into the spectral shadows of St. John’s Sanctuary which has sat quietly for 190 years in the heart of historical Greenwich Village. But, now…lit by flickering candlelight, bathed in ghostly mist, the players at the award-winning, critically-acclaimed Radiotheatre hope to chill the marrow in your bones as they celebrate the High Holy Days of HALLOWEEN with its 9th Annual H.P. LOVECRAFT FESTIVAL…teeming with very special denizens of its own, 
so rich in bloodcurdling variety that the heart thuds loudly, sweat breaks and the cringing mind searches shudderingly 
for the next ghastly manifestation in this terrifying feast of fiendish delights! All live, onstage complete with our fabulous cast, original orchestral scores and a plethora of sound FX 
in our ongoing tribute to the Grandmaster of 20th Century American Horror himself, H.P. LOVECRAFT(1890-1937.) 
St. John’s Sanctuary    81 Christopher St.  NYC  
Off 7th Ave.  #1 train Sheridan Sq.  All W4th St Trains
THE STORIES

HERBERT WEST, REANIMATOR – A Lovecraft classic!  A mad doctor’s assistant recalls their efforts to resurrect the dead!

THE SHADOW OVER INNSMOUTH – A young man visits the seedy New England seaport of Innsmouth where he finds a strange breed of inhabitants. 

THE HORROR AT RED HOOK – A NYC cop uncovers a terrible cult alive in Brooklyn, but no one believes him!

THE EVIL CLERGYMAN – A man finds himself in an eerie attic with a Satanic past.

THE THING ON THE DOORSTEP – A man marries a weird woman whom he claims has possessed him body and soul!

HYPNOS – A female sculptor spends years with her mate sharing drug induced dreams where they travel to a place called Hypnos.

DAGON – A shipwrecked man discovers an island of strange beings who worship ancient gods.  After he is rescued, they pursue him. 

THE TRANSITION OF JUAN ROMERO – A gold mine explodes leaving a fathomless abyss into which a miner and his Mexican friend enter! 

THE STATEMENT OF RANDOLPH CARTER – Two scientists explore the frightening world beneath an old cemetery!


CALENDAR OF SHOWS   ALL SHOWS @  8 PM

10/19-  REANIMATOR; EVIL CLERGYMAN

10/20 – THING ON DOORSTEP; HORROR AT RED HOOK

10/21 – SHADOW OVER INNSMOUTH; HYPNOS

10/25 – DAGON; STATEMENT; HYPNOS; EVIL CLERGYMAN

10/28 – REANIMATOR; EVIL CLERGYMAN

10/29 – INSMOUTH; HORROR AT RED HOOK

10/30 – REANIMATOR; TRANSITION

11/1 –   INNSMOUTH; HYPNOS

11/3 –   THING ON DOORSTEP; HORROR AT RED HOOK

11/4 –   REANIMATOR; EVIL CLERGYMAN 

11/5 –   DAGON; STATEMENT; EVIL CLERGYMAN; HYPNOS
SMARTTIX.COM  212 – 868-4444
WRITTEN/DIRECTED/MUSIC 
BY DAN BIANCHI
SOUND DESIGN- DAN BIANCHI/ WES SHIPPEE
CAST: FRANK ZILINYI; R.PATRICK ALBERTY; 
ALEJANDRO CARDOZO; CAITLIN BOYLE
“THE GREATEST PRACTIONER OF HORROR IN THE 20th CENTURY!”   STEPHEN KING

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From huck magazine:

The photographer who defined old-school cool

Street symphony

Posted
Text by Alex King
Photography © Jamal Shabazz

Jamel Shabazz has spent his life documenting the city that never sleeps. But while his shots of urban street style have become iconic, the bigger picture – a world of police and prostitutes, drifters and dancers – reveals something much deeper: a commitment to community.

It’s early morning in Rikers Island jail and a young corrections officer named Jamel Shabazz has just begun his first inspection. The residential wing is so hot that the stench of stale cigarettes and dead rodents hangs heavily.

There is a line of 30 units on both sides of the corridor, each one of them holding a juvenile inmate who may have trashed his cell, retreated to a corner or hung himself with a bed sheet.

“To make a physical count, you have to make sure a body is in each cell,” Jamel explains. And there is an abundance of bodies.

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It’s the mid-1980s and a crack epidemic is sweeping through New York City, generating a wave of violence that’s carrying thousands of young black men into the city’s prisons and morgues.

“It felt like being in a lifeboat watching a sinking ship and you can only help so many people,” says Jamel, thinking back to that time.

“But it didn’t stop me from going to work every single day looking for someone to connect with and provide direction to.”

Working in prison made Jamel’s mission clear to him: he became determined to steer young men away from ruining their lives, feeding a vicious cycle of regret. And it didn’t take long for him to realise how he’d do that.

Jamel_Shabazz_Little_Big_Man
Think of old-school hip hop and, chances are, you will conjure up one of Jamel Shabazz’s unforgettable portraits. Jamel came of age during the birth of rap in mid-70s New York. He remembers block parties in Coffey Park, Brooklyn, where a group of DJs and MCs would “hot-wire” the electricity supply of a lamppost to keep the party going long into the night.

His photobook Back in the Days immortalises the b-boys, boomboxes and big hair of 1980s New York City in one cornerstone document. But the purpose behind these images has often gone overlooked.

“I don’t get caught up on the fashion,” he says. “My photographs have always been about the personal connections I make in my attempt to communicate what’s going on in the streets.”

Rush-Hour-2
Jamel’s new book, Sights in the City, aims to redress that balance by showcasing his street photography in one place for the first time. It spans the duration of his career and illuminates the complex city that has defined his life.

Growing up in the Red Hook area of Brooklyn, Jamel discovered photography through his father, a naval combat photographer who taught him to carry a loaded camera at all times.

Initially borrowing his mother’s cheap Kodak, the 15-year-old began directing groups of his friends into poses and developing a signature style.

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Tue 10 2017 , by

Meet Me Downtown

Local Photographer’s work on exhibit at Museum of Contemporary African Diasporan Arts

80 Hanson Place The work will be on view weekdays during regular building hours. (At least till Friday, 20th of October 2017)

Joel Barhamand is a Downtown Brooklyn based photographer whose work has highlighted the ongoing changes in the neighborhood. His photographs were featured in the New York Times article “Fulton Mall, Amid Change”, and his work will now be presented at the 80 Arts Building. Join for light refreshments and the opportunity to meet the photographer himself as part of the Culture Forward Festival.

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With the New York Adventure Club:

Behind-the-Scenes @ Woodlawn Cemetery & Locked Gilded Age Family Mausoleums

Step inside some of the country’s most opulent family mausoleums that are rarely unlocked for the public, until now.

Join New York Adventure Club for an exclusive, behind-the-scenes experience at Woodlawn Cemetery, one of the largest cemeteries in New York City covering more than 400 acres and serving as the resting place for more than 300,000 people.

Sat. Oct. 21: 3pm-5pm

Woodlawn Conservancy

3800 Jerome Avenue

Bronx, NY 10467

Led by a cemetery docent, our unique experience will include:

 

  • The history and story of Woodlawn Cemetery, and how it became the favored cemetery of so many prominent NYC families from the late 1800s to early 1900s
  • An exploration of the cemetery’s grounds to see some of its most notable mausoleums, sculptures, and landscapes
  • Exclusive access inside some of its most impressive Gilded Age family mausoleums including Harkness, Harbeck, and Dunlop, which contain Tiffany glass, Italian marble, and even a dead parrot

 

Click here to see pictures from one of our last trips to Woodlawn Cemetery!

* Please bring a good pair of walking shoes since we’ll be on our feet for the entirety of the tour!

 


 

Disclaimer

By attending a New York Adventure Club experience, you accept our terms of service.

Categories: Tours, Active, Historic Sites

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Op-Ed from Jeremiah Moss in The New York Times:

The storefront gallery in Little Italy is closing, another sign
that New York is losing the things that made it so captivating.

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Thursday Oct 05, 2017
7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

POWERHOUSE @ the Archway
28 Adams Street (Corner of Adams & Water Street @ the Archway)
Brooklyn , NY 11201

 

RSVP appreciated:

Please fill out the “Bookings” form at the bottom of this page.

-or-

Send the name of the event and number of attendees to our RSVP email.
*Disregard the notification that will appear after Booking.*

PLEASE NOTE: Submitting an RSVP for this event DOES NOT guarantee entrance. This is a free-access event — entrance will be on a first-come, first-served basis.


About the Book:

From Times Square and the Empire State Building to Greenwich Village and the South Street Seaport, New York City is one of the most iconic cities in the world. But any true New Yorker knows that the best parts of the city lay beyond the glare of neon lights, hidden between the landmarks and in the shadows of the characteristic neighborhoods and boroughs that define it. In her new book New Yorker cartoonist Julia Wertz brilliantly unearths the history behind many of these treasures. TENEMENTS, TOWERS & TRASH: An Unconventional Illustrated History of New York City, is a quirky, charismatic, and hilarious illustrated history of New York City, rendered in captivating drawings and comics in Julia’s singular style.

Through “then and now” drawings and tales of New Yorkers past, TENEMENTS, TOWERS & TRASH paints a raw, unconventional, and often hilarious portrait of New York in all its neurotic glory. From an extensive underground pneumatic tube system build by the New York Postal System in the late 1800’s to the pizzeria that fronted for mafia activity; from beloved bookstores to outlaw abolitionists to a bottle-filled beach where horse carcasses were once sent to rot, Wertz illuminates the stories behind some of the city’s most famous and infamous mainstays and provides little-known backstories to its not-so-secret gems. It’s a New York you won’t find in any guidebook, one where the bustling bodegas, crumbling corners, and hideaway hotspots are not just part of its charm but integral to its character. In TENEMENTS, TOWERS & TRASH we come to see how the city’s dirtiest, ugliest, most eccentric areas are ultimately what make it so beautiful and extraordinary.

Wertz’s refreshing and charismatic voice brings to life the world within these pages, making the book perfect for the millions of New York natives, transplants, history buffs, and those who have always been intrigued by the city of dreams. Meticulously detailed and side-splittingly funny, TENEMENTS, TOWERS & TRASH offers a unique glimpse into the inimitable weirdness that makes New York City the greatest in the world.

 

About the Cartoonists:

AuthorPhoto_JuliaWertzJulia Wertz is a professional cartoonist and amateur historian. She has published five graphic novels and does monthly history comics for The New Yorker and Harper’s Magazine.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Emily Flake UmansMe

 

 

Emily Flake is a cartoonist, writer, and illustrator living in Brooklyn, NY. Her cartoons appear regularly in the New Yorker, as well as on the Nib and, when she can manage it, MAD Magazine.…

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From The New York Post:

Bronx Community College removes Confederate busts

The busts of two Confederate generals have been swiftly removed from Bronx Community College amid a national conversation about the relics — but the school left the bust of one racist scientist in place, The Post has learned.

In a purge for which various officials took credit, the monuments to Confederate leaders Robert E. Lee and Stonewall Jackson unceremoniously disappeared from an open-air sculpture gallery overnight Thursday.

Bronx Borough President Ruben Diaz Jr. has called the presence of Confederate icons in his borough “especially galling,” leading Gov. Cuomo to say they had to go “because New York stands against racism.”College President Thomas Isekenegbe also pledged to replace the busts with other historical figures that would help create a “space where all people feel respected, welcomed, and valued.”

In their rush to remove Confederates and sanitize the school’s “Hall of Fame for Great Americans,” officials left the bronze bust of the racist, 19th-century scientist Louis Agassiz.

The Swiss-born paleontologist landed a professorship at Harvard following a wildly successful American lecture tour in 1846, and he was ­instrumental in establishing the Ivy League school’s Museum of Comparative Zoology, the first publicly funded science building in North America.

Agassiz was the country’s most famous scientist when he died in 1873, but his reputation eventually suffered because of what the University of California Museum of Paleontology calls “his racist attitudes, which were extreme even for his day.”

“Agassiz could not accept that all groups of humans belonged to the same species, and he argued vehemently for the inferiority of non-white human groups,” according to the museum’s Web site.

The move came amid continuing outrage over the deadly violence that erupted at a rally of white supremacists who gathered in Charlottesville, Va., last Saturday to protest the planned removal of a Lee statue.

“That’s pretty f–ked up. We are all people. We bleed the same color,” said Daniel Roman, 20, who was passing through the college campus Friday evening. “Especially with what’s going on in the South, he can go f- -k himself. I’m all about equality.”

 

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