Category:

Art and Music

January 20 – March 3, 2018

New York, NY – WESTWOOD GALLERY NYC presents a premiere New York City exhibition of photographs by Bob Adelman and curated by James Cavello. The exhibition highlights forty photographs of four influential artists who changed 20th century art, whom Adelman began photographing in the 1960s: Andy Warhol, Roy Lichtenstein, James Rosenquist and Tom Wesselmann. This is the first New York exhibition of the photographs, in keeping with the gallery program of focusing on undiscovered bodies of work. The Estate of Mr. Adelman includes a very limited selection of signed prints, and the gallery is pleased to provide this exclusive opportunity for collectors.

Bob Adelman was compelled to photograph New York artists in the 1960s when he became interested in understanding the inner workings of the creative mind. The photographs on view provide an intimate, sometimes playful view of legendary artists and Adelman’s own ingenious sense in capturing their persona in the studio. They include scenes from Andy Warhol’s daily life at the Factory: Warhol on the infamous red couch, shopping at a nearby Gristedes for Brillo Boxes and Campbell Soup cans, socializing with his glamorous inner-circle at parties, filming, and posing with his flower paintings as well as the ‘The American Man’ suite. The photographs of Roy Lichtenstein span several decades and document the artist in his studio with his paintings and completing his iconic murals, such as: the fleeting 1963 “Greene Street Mural,” the permanent 1989 “Tel Aviv Museum of Art Mural,” and the collage for “Times Square Mural”. James Rosenquist is documented with his paintings and murals, showing a completed “Big Bo” and the stages toward his 1980 “Star Thief” mural. Rosenquist is also captured in an iconic image: looking through a magnifying glass into Adelman’s camera. The photographs of Tom Wesselmann in 1966 portray his early years which illustrate the beginning of his career-defining artwork in his first studio at 54 Bond Street, as well as in Sidney Janis Gallery. Other photos of Wesselmann, 20 years later, depict the artist holding a steel-cut nude outline of his long-time model and studio assistant, Monica Serra, in 1988 at his later studio at 231 Bowery.

Photographs © Bob Adelman Estate

During Adelman’s time in New York, his portfolio matured to document over fifty years of prominent and pioneering New York artists. This vast archive includes photographs of Larry Rivers, Donald Judd, Jasper Johns, Marisol Escobar, Red Grooms, Jeff Koons, Adolph Gottlieb, Barnett Newman, Robert Rauschenberg, Dick Bellamy, Lucas Samaras, Jim Dine, David Hockney as well as influential art dealers who shifted the perception of how to sell art, such as Leo Castelli.

As his friend and mentor Ralph Ellison stated, “Adelman has moved beyond the familiar clichés of most documentary photography into that rare sphere wherein technical ability and social vision combine to create a work of art.”

An internationally-recognized photojournalist, Bob Adelman worked for LIFE, The New York Times Magazine, Newsweek, TIME, Esquire, Vanity Fair, London’s Sunday Times Magazine, Paris Match, and other major publications.

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Friday
Jan 19
Greenwich Village
New Yorkers have a tendency to romanticize bygone eras of city history: the jazzy ’20s; the gritty ’70s; or even the simpler times of the early 2010s. This weekend, the New Ohio Theatre on Christopher Street will re-create an iconic slab of ’60s infamy — the artist-haunted Chelsea Hotel. There will be cheap drinks, old tunes, and photographers shooting on film, all meant to evoke the infamous hotel. We suggest you read Patti Smith’s Just Kids to prepare.
Cost: $20 suggested donation at the door.

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NY Adventure Club Presents: New Year’s Eve Speakeasy @ Civic Club Mansion

Don your flapper dress or three-piece tux and ring in the New Year inside a century-old mansion usually closed to the public, until now.

Join New York Adventure Club as we step back in time for an intimate, prohibition-era celebration inside a private mansion — originally built in 1899 for the Civic Club (which was dedicated to reducing poverty and gambling in the neighborhood), the house is now owned and operated by the New York Estonian Educational Society, which acts as the main center of Estonian culture on the U.S. Eastern seaboard

Once you relay the secret password at the entrance, you will enter into a highbrow affair and be treated to:

 

  • A host of interactive antique decor and props such as antique radios, Edison cylinders, stereoscopes (with prohibition-themed slides), and original prohibition prescriptions
  • Opportunities to purchase food and drinks from the house’s full restaurant and bar
  • Parlor games from the time period, including billiards and foosball
  • A champagne toast at midnight, which Volstead Act agents would have tried break up had they caught wind of it
  • Your ticket to this unique gathering includes entry into the private gilded age mansion, interactive opportunities with tons of authentic antiques from nearly a century ago, parlor games, and a glass of champagne to ring in the New Year.

     

    Flapper dress / black tie optional.

    See you there!

     


     

    Disclaimer

    Must be 21 or older.

    ID will be checked at door.

    By attending a New York Adventure Club experience, you accept our terms of service.

    Categories: Hidden Spots, Food, Historic Sites, Social

    58 tickets available

    $30

    Sunday, Dec 31
    9:30 PM – 1 AM

    New York

    Estonian House

    243 East 34th Street

    New York, NY 10016

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Victorian Holiday Party

What better way to celebrate the holidays than in a beautiful Victorian home? Enjoy offerings of hot spiced wine, apple cider and cookies while singing along to some traditional Christmas carols! Starting at 5pm, there will be a special radio performance by the Fireside Mystery Theatre. Victorian regalia welcomed! Tickets are $10, $8 Members/Students.

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A mural depicting New York City in the 1800s may soon be lost to time. The 1954 canvas painting by Julien Binford, entitled “A Memory of 14th Street and 6th Avenue,” is a 110-foot-long piece that is currently housed in the lobby of a now closed, one-story bank building, which stands at the intersection of Chelsea, the West Village and the Meatpacking District. The site is slated to become condominiums and retail space at the hand of developer Gemini Rosemont, which purchased the property for $42.4 million earlier this year. The New York Times reports that the interior has already been stripped. 

Andrew Cronson, a junior from New York University, spotted the mural back in October and contacted several local preservationist groups once he saw demolition permits posted on the building. Save Chelsea responded to the call, and now, alongside City Councilman Corey Johnson, it’s urging the developer to preserve the mural or turn it over to someone who will. While Gemini Rosemont is open to doing so, the company has not committed to the cause. In the meantime, it has been considering the options and contacting galleries to determine their interest in acquiring the piece, and its actual value. So far, there have been no bites.


The lobby of the former HSBC bank building

However, real estate company, Jamestown, which owns the Chelsea Market, has shown interest in taking the mural. Google has also stated that it would like to help protect the painting, The Times reports. Because the bank building is still in the design phase, no date has been set for the demolition.

The mural, which is painted on canvas, depicts what 14th Street and 6th Avenue might have look during the late 1800s: women are depicted carrying parasols; there are horse-drawn carriages and commuters are seen running to an elevated train. Before it was gutted, the building (101 W. 14th St.), designed by Halsey, McCormack & Helmer and constructed in 1953, formerly housed a HSBC branch. Binford, however, painted the mural for what was then known as the Greenwich Savings Bank.

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A Bit of a Party, December 11
Celebrate Charles Dickens’s A Christmas Carol in a whole new way. A Bit of a Party is an understatement; this event combines immersive theater, free-for-all desserts, and a wild afterparty with live holiday music. Theater troupe No. 11 presents a choose-your-own-adventure live staging of Dickens’s classic; indulge before and after in the goodies and the tunes. South Oxford Space, 138 South Oxford Street, Fort Greene

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Sunday, December 3 at 7:00 PM8:00 PM EST

Quimby’s Bookstore NYC

536 Metropolitan Ave, Brooklyn, New York 11211

Details

The Woman Rebel: Revolutionary Politics, Rollicking Parties and the Women who Shook New York.

Imagine you are at a party with the anarchist Emma Goldman, the dancer Isadora Duncan and the women’s health pioneer Margaret Sanger. Two things are probably true: you are at Mabel Dodge’s celebrated Wednesday Night Salon, and Marcel Duchamp is swinging from the chandelier.

When Dodge began her salon in 1912, she claimed, “every thinking person nowadays is in revolt against something.” At the time, Radical Politics thrived on the Lower East Side, Modern Art was radiating out of Greenwich Village, social and sexual mores were in flux south of 14th street, and women were at the vanguard of the Revolution.

This talk will explore what made downtown so ripe for rebellion, and honor the radical women who called the area home. Along the way, we’ll meet the Rebel Girl and the Priestess of Anarchy, check out the saloon known as the “most famous radical center in New York,” and discover which nightclub has been “an idyllic place of controversy and entertainment” for over a century.

Kick up your heals and join us!

Bio

Lucie Levine is the founder of Archive on Parade, a local tour and event company that takes New York’s fascinating history out of the archives and into the streets. She’s a Native New Yorker, and licensed New York City tour guide, with a passion for the city’s fascinating social, political and cultural history. She’s worked with institutions including the 92nd Street Y, The New York Public Library, the St. Regis Hotel, Fraunces Tavern, The Brooklyn Brainery and The Society for the Advancement of Social Studies to offer exciting tours, lectures and events all over town. She is also the News Editor for Greenpointers, and her work and events have been featured on Greenpointers, Untapped Cities, 6sqft, Brokelyn and The Skint.

$10.00 suggested donation

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Those Quirky Victorians
Learn About Those Quirky Victorians At A Free Public Lecture At Sotheby’s
570 Lexington Avenue 6th floor |
Tuesday, November 28th, 2017
7:00PM – 8:30PM

Sotheby’s Institute of Art Speaker Series Presents

Those Quirky Victorians: Re-purposed Traditions Through 21st Century Art,

 

Design and Science

 

The Victorian era was a time fertile in essential technological inventions, means of communication and artistic design. In the name of science, discovery,  amusement and financial gain Victorians collected profusely.  Parallel to the idea of progress was the reality of quirky hobbies, impractical contraptions and obsessive interests.

This panel aims to shed a light on a selection of impactful Victorian developments, namely the marriage of science and art in the reproduction of historical artifacts, the expansion of  landscape gardens as a reflection of urban necessity and the compulsion to craft individual identities through pictorial representation.

Panelists:

  • John D. Ward, Senior Vice President, Head of Silver Department, Sotheby’s
  • Barbara Frelinghuysen Israel, Owner, Barbara Israel Garden Antiques
  • Tim Hamilton, Generalist Appraiser, Gurr Johns

 

Moderator: Ann-Marie Richard, Director, MA Fine and Decorative Art and Design, Sotheby’s Institute of Art-NY

John D. Ward, Senior Vice President, Head of Silver Department, Sotheby’s

“The Department of Science and Art: Elkington reproductions of Silver Treasures”

John D. Ward joined Sotheby’s in 1997 and has presided over the strong slate of single-owner and various-owners Silver sales the company has offered in New York.Mr Ward presided over the Charles L Poor sale of Early English Silver, the Jaime Ortiz-Patiño sales of Lamerie and English Chinoiserie Silver, The Jeffords Collection of Early American Silver, The Bluhdorn Collection of Important English Silver and Silver-gilt, and the Thyssen Meissonnier Tureen, the second-highest price ever paid for Silver at auction. He also catalogued the English Silver of the Royal House of Hanover when that was offered in Germany in 2005. Mr Ward has placed works with the Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Gilbert Collection, Winterthur and other major institutions in Boston, Chicago, St Louis, Dallas, Houston, Baltimore, Los Angeles County and the British National Trust.  Mr Ward has a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Chicago and a Master’s degree in the History of Decorative Arts from the Bard Graduate Center for Studies in the Decorative Arts, New York.

 

Barbara Frelinghuysen Israel, Owner, Barbara Israel Garden Antiques

“Victorian Taste: Cemeteries, Botanicals and Overcrowded Gardens”

Barbara Frelinghuysen Israel founded Barbara Israel Garden Antiques in 1985, after a serendipitous purchase of a large collection of estate statuary lead her down the garden antiques path. Now in her 32st year in business, Barbara is recognized as an authority on the subject. Barbara’s exhaustively researched book, Antique Garden Ornament: Two Centuries of American Taste (1999), is the definitive work in the field. She is also the author of A Guide to Buying Antique Garden Ornament (2012), a user-friendly handbook packed with tips on conservation, identification and more.

As a dealer, Barbara collects the finest examples of garden ornament, guided by her appreciation for classical forms and her love of unusual, once-in-a-lifetime finds.

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From Atlas Obscura:

The Twilight of the Analog Photo Booth

The effort to save a rare beast on the road to extinction.

On a recent Saturday morning in New York, the analog photo booth in the Ace Hotel on 29th Street was out of order. Inside the booth, which costs $5 plus tax for a strip of four black-and-white photographs (cards accepted), a piece of paper hung askew atop the mirror, level with the sign reading “EYE LEVEL.” “Sorry, I’m broken …” it read. “I’ll be better soon. XO, Ace.” Barely a dozen of these film-based photo booths remain in the city, a fact that would have been inconceivable as recently as the 1990s.

In September 1925, the crowds stretched around the block for the first ever Photomaton studio, 30 blocks north of the present site of the Ace Hotel, at 51st Street and Broadway. Each subject paid 25 cents, was bathed in flashes of light, and waited eight minutes for a strip of eight photographs. Eighteen months later, the New York Times reported, “Young Photomaton Inventor Will Celebrate His First Million.” In today’s money, this would be close to $14 million.

Anatol Josepho, the inventor of the "Photomaton" photo booth that debuted in September 1925 at 1659 Broadway in New York City.
Anatol Josepho, the inventor of the “Photomaton” photo booth that debuted in September 1925 at 1659 Broadway in New York City. Library of Congress/LC-DIG-ggbain-25079

The inventor, Anatol Josepho, was born in 1894, and came from nothing. Josepho, né Josephowitz, grew up a banished Jew in Siberia. At 15, he went off to explore the world, starting in Berlin, where he bought a Brownie camera and learned to take photographs. Later, he took it to Budapest, to Shanghai, and eventually to New York. In Harlem, in 1925, he raised the $11,000 required to build a prototype for the first curtain-enclosed photo booth—the cost of nearly six reasonably sized houses at that time. Josepho was charming, and obsessed with the project, writes photographer Näkki Goranin. Despite being a newcomer to the city, “[he] was able to talk people into loaning him the money, find the appropriate machinists and engineers to help him build his Photomaton machine, and be sought out by the leading industrialists in America.”

Josepho stood on the shoulders of decades of tinkerers who had been flirting with this technology since the 1880s, when a craze for vending machines of all kinds, including seltzer, chocolate, and postcards, seized Europe and America. Concurrently, photographic technology was developing at a galloping pace. Some early booths offered prints for a penny, others unreliable tintypes with near-unrecognizable subjects. Throughout the 1920s, the technology was becoming more and more refined—until, in 1925, Josepho patented the booth that set the standard for the next 90 years.

Two friends pose for a picture in a photo booth, date unknown.
Two friends pose for a picture in a photo booth, date unknown. simpleinsomnia/CC BY 2.0

Before long the photo booth was everywhere: malls, bars, airports, post offices, Fred Astaire films. In the United States, they were often owned by the company PhotoMe, says Tim Garrett, an artist who co-runs the site Photobooth.Net with friend and colleague Brian Meacham.

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