Category:

Vintage Clothing and Antiques

  

by William M. Hoffman and Anthony Holland

In partnership with Frontline Productions

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Join us for a glimpse into the early history of colonial New York with this stage reading about New York City in 1708 – a time of chaos and political passion.

The Dutch are still seething from the British takeover, and Lord Cornbury, considered a buffoon in
British circles, is sent to the colonies by his cousin, Queen Anne, to be Governor of New York and New Jersey. He has no interest in government and at his first public appearance he wears a dress; which causes controversy to ensue.

 …

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From The New York Times:

A shabbily dressed man walked into an opulent restaurant. It was the 1970s, when people still made a sartorial effort for a night out in Manhattan. Alone, he took a seat in the lounge.

The restaurant’s owner, Laura Maioglio, wasn’t wearing her glasses, so her vision was blurry. She didn’t think much of the visitor. But her widowed mother, Piera Maioglio, who was with her, did. “Oh, that poor person, he doesn’t look like he can afford Barbetta,” Piera told her daughter.

Together they observed the man from their usual table in the back of the 100-seat dining room, lit by a majestic chandelier built in 1775, acquired from a palazzo in Turin, Italy.

A Barbetta menu from that era, at the New York Public Library in the Manuscripts, Archives, and Rare Book Division, lists roast rack of lamb for two for $14.50. There was an additional 75-cent cover charge. Back then, it would have cost at least $20 a head for dinner with wine, plus an extra $2 to $3 for shavings of white truffle flown in from Piedmont, in Northern Italy. Dinner would easily cost about $150 for two today.

Piera, who was extremely beautiful, Laura recalled — “a cross between Marlene Dietrich and Greta Garbo” — instructed a waiter to bring the man a menu to alert him what he was in for. Once he saw the prices, she thought, he could make a face-saving excuse to leave and not have to skulk out after being seated in the dining room.

The Maioglio women had been watching over the theater district Italian restaurant, at 321 West 46th Street, since 1962. That was the year Piera’s husband and Barbetta’s founder, Sebastiano Maioglio, died at the age of 82. Laura was their only child.

The man didn’t budge after glancing at the menu, contending that he was waiting for three friends.

Laura went to take a closer look. It was Mick Jagger.

“Who’s Mick Jagger?” Piera asked.

“He’s with the Rolling Stones,” Laura said.

“Who are the Rolling Stones?” asked Piera.

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Photo

The Rolling Stones and Andy Warhol were regulars at Barbetta in the ’70s. More recently, the Clintons and Lin-Manuel Miranda have stopped by. Credit Dina Litovsky for The New York Times

These days at Barbetta, most guests dress casually. On a recent evening, Rick Miramontez, the press agent for “Hello, Dolly!” and “Springsteen on Broadway,” sat tie-less in the lounge, something he would not have dared to do when he visited for the first time in 1979. “It was very dressy, very starched, a necktie place through the ’80s, no question,” he said.

Indeed, from its townhouse exterior to its brocade chairs and swag curtains, Barbetta is a throwback to the days of the fancy restaurant.

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Sat 02 2018 , by

Valuable Tour

From The Fraunces Tavern Museum:

Valuable Tour

A 45-minute tour of the special exhibition Valuable plus a docent facilitated group discussion. This tour will give you a chance to see Fraunces Tavern Museum as you’ve never seen it before and to dive deep into some of the most valuable pieces within Fraunces Tavern Museum’s collection and asks the question: what makes them so valuable? How have these artifacts shaped the history of our culture today? From Martha Washington’s slipper to Von Steuben’s camp liquor chest, each of these objects tells us something about early American culture and beyond.

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We offer guided Museum Tours to the public FREE with admission on the following days and times:

Thursdays @ 2pm
Fridays @ 2pm
Saturdays @ 1pm & 2pm

Sundays @ 1pm & 2pm

Saturdays in February @ 3pm – Fighting for Freedom Tour

There are NO guided tours on the following dates and times:

Sunday, February 11 @ 1pm
Sunday, February 18 @ 2pm
Saturday, February 24 @ 2pm

*No reservations are required. Please plan your arrival accordingly, as space is limited.

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from The Fraunces Tavern Museum website:

A 45-minute guided tour about Revolutionary spies such as Nathan Hale, Benjamin Tallmadge, and Lydia Darrah. Learn about the tools of the trade as a spymaster, the creation of America’s very first spy ring, and catch a glimpse of the last known letter from Nathan Hale which hasn’t been on display in over decade!

We offer guided Museum Tours to the public FREE with admission on the following days and times:

Thursdays @ 2pm
Fridays @ 2pm
Saturdays @ 1pm & 2pm

Sundays @ 1pm & 2pm

Saturdays in February @ 3pm – Fighting for Freedom Tour

There are NO guided tours on the following dates and times:

Sunday, February 11 @ 1pm
Sunday, February 18 @ 2pm
Saturday, February 24 @ 2pm

*No reservations are required. Please plan your arrival accordingly, as space is limited.

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Friday, February 2nd, 2018 1pm to 8pm

Saturday, February 3rd, 2018 11am-6pm

At The Metropolitan Pavilion, 125 W 18th street (between 6th & 7th Avenues)

$15/at the door

Buy tickets via the website: http://manhattanvintage.com/upcoming-shows/

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Friday
Jan 19
Greenwich Village
New Yorkers have a tendency to romanticize bygone eras of city history: the jazzy ’20s; the gritty ’70s; or even the simpler times of the early 2010s. This weekend, the New Ohio Theatre on Christopher Street will re-create an iconic slab of ’60s infamy — the artist-haunted Chelsea Hotel. There will be cheap drinks, old tunes, and photographers shooting on film, all meant to evoke the infamous hotel. We suggest you read Patti Smith’s Just Kids to prepare.
Cost: $20 suggested donation at the door.

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Mod New York New York Fashion Takes A Trip

From Rizzoli Books: https://www.rizzolibookstore.com/news/mod-new-york-1

Conversation, reception, and book-signing, with Phyllis Madgidson, Donald Albrect, and Caroline Reynnolds Milbank

According to the skint e-mail newsletter, attending while dressed in the Mod style of Twiggy is encouraged, but not required.

Store Location and Hours

 

    • 1133 Broadway
      between 25th and 26th Street
      New York, NY 10010
      (map)
    • (800) 52-BOOKS – Toll Free
      (212) 759-2424 – Telephone
    • Monday–Friday: 10:30–8:00
      Saturday: 12:00-8:00
      Sunday: 11:00–7:00

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from Lost City:

04 September 2012

Lascoff Drugs Closes After a 113 Years

I thought upper Lexington Avenue had a special force field surrounding it (i.e.—influential rich people) that allowed an inordinate number of old businesses to survive. But, alas, I was wrong. If the bluebloods couldn’t save the iconic Upper East Side pharmacy Lascoff Drugs, what can they save?
Lascoff closed last July after 113 years in business. I don’t know how I missed that. I guess lately I’ve unconsciously learned to avert my eyes when beautiful landmarks shutter. I just can’t bear the pain.
Lascoff, along with Bigelow and one or two others, was one of New York’s great, classic pharmacies. It opened in 1899, when McKinley was President, and was the first licensed pharmacy in New York State, according to the New York Times. It was a store so majestic and solemn, you felt like you were entering a church when you went in. High ceilings, high shelving, a balcony, ancient Pharmacuetical relics, and silence. No music. You could find many old and classic brands there that you couldn’t locate elsewhere. And the vertical sign on the corner building was one of the grandest in the city.
The enterprise was founded by J. Leon Lascoff. He was born in Vilna, then in Russian Poland, and came to New York in 1892. His first drug store was at Lex and 83rd. He then moved across the street and then, in 1931, moved to 82nd and Lex—Lascoff’s final location. He died in 1936. His son Frederick took over the business and ran it until his death in 1970. During Fred’s time, the store had a reputation for odd cures. It sold leeches to boxers and catnip oil to lion hunters. He once sold a mixture of phenol, valerian, asafetida and iodoform to a colleague who had complained that his own pharmacy didn’t smell enough like a drug store.
After Frederick died, the business fell out of the family. It was purchased by Phil and Susan Ragusa. I assume they were still running it when it closed.

2 comments:

upstate johnny g said…

Aaarrrgggghhhhhh!!!!!!!! Another icon, another living link to the past, another glorious example of how time travel is almost possible, is closed. My girlfriend and I popped by Lascoff one morning this past summer and even though it was a weekday, they were closed. We didn’t quite get it, because we’d been there before and business seemed healthy enough. Brooks, we have you to thank for turning us on to Lascoff’s in the first place with your great posting about that neighborhood. We would go to Lascoff’s and then pop over to the Lexington Candy Shop to have a real burger and a Coke made with actual Coke syrup and carbonated water, mixed with a spoon by the fountain guy. Your Yorkville guide opened all of this up to us. Thanks.

Do you have any idea what will become of Lascoff’s?

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At Museum of the City of New York

1220 Fifth Ave at 103rd St., Open Daily 10am–6pm

Back to Exhibitions

From frozen ponds to Madison Square Garden, ice-skating has become a quintessentially New York pastime, woven into the city’s urban fabric in ways large and small.

New York on Ice: Skating in the City invites visitors to explore how ice-skating evolved in the city from its colonial Dutch and British origins to become a 19th-century craze, and later an opportunity for elaborate spectacle, commercialized leisure, and competitive sport in the 20th century and beyond. Along the way, skating has left its mark on New York’s urban landscape, from the design of Central Park, to intimate hotel rinks and extravagant arenas, to a plethora of skating facilities that today define and transform parks and other public spaces across the city.

The story of New York on Ice will be told through vintage photographs, posters, lithographs, paintings, and costumes. Together they reveal the evolution of the sport and art of ice-skating in the city both as a window into a passion and pastime of generations of New Yorkers, and as an unexpected ingredient of urban place-making.

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NY Adventure Club Presents: New Year’s Eve Speakeasy @ Civic Club Mansion

Don your flapper dress or three-piece tux and ring in the New Year inside a century-old mansion usually closed to the public, until now.

Join New York Adventure Club as we step back in time for an intimate, prohibition-era celebration inside a private mansion — originally built in 1899 for the Civic Club (which was dedicated to reducing poverty and gambling in the neighborhood), the house is now owned and operated by the New York Estonian Educational Society, which acts as the main center of Estonian culture on the U.S. Eastern seaboard

Once you relay the secret password at the entrance, you will enter into a highbrow affair and be treated to:

 

  • A host of interactive antique decor and props such as antique radios, Edison cylinders, stereoscopes (with prohibition-themed slides), and original prohibition prescriptions
  • Opportunities to purchase food and drinks from the house’s full restaurant and bar
  • Parlor games from the time period, including billiards and foosball
  • A champagne toast at midnight, which Volstead Act agents would have tried break up had they caught wind of it
  • Your ticket to this unique gathering includes entry into the private gilded age mansion, interactive opportunities with tons of authentic antiques from nearly a century ago, parlor games, and a glass of champagne to ring in the New Year.

     

    Flapper dress / black tie optional.

    See you there!

     


     

    Disclaimer

    Must be 21 or older.

    ID will be checked at door.

    By attending a New York Adventure Club experience, you accept our terms of service.

    Categories: Hidden Spots, Food, Historic Sites, Social

    58 tickets available

    $30

    Sunday, Dec 31
    9:30 PM – 1 AM

    New York

    Estonian House

    243 East 34th Street

    New York, NY 10016

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