Category:

Vintage Clothing and Antiques

April 2017 marks fifty years since the
Museum received its charter from the New
York State Department of Education Board of
Regents. Over that fifty years the Museum has
grown dramatically, collecting artifacts and
works of art documenting the rise of New York
as a port city.; developing and implementing
innovative and award-winning programming;
mounting exhibitions; and preserving a fleet of
historic ships on the East River. Despite three
massive setbacks: the 9/11 attacks, the Great
Recession of 2008, and the floodwaters of hurri-
cane Sandy, the museum is growing once again.
With support from New York City and a dedi-
cated group of staff, volunteers, members and
friends, the Seaport Museum remains an edu-
cational and cultural gem in lower Manhattan.
The Seaport Museum’s 50th anniversary will
be marked throughout the year with the open-
ing of new exhibitions, including Millions:
Migrants and Millionaires aboard the Great
Liners, 1900-1914 (opening June 2017), artistic
and musical performances, lectures and book
talks, walking tours, and a formal 50th anni-
versary cocktail reception aboard the 1885 ship
Wavertree in September. #

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From The New York Post:

Bronx Community College removes Confederate busts

The busts of two Confederate generals have been swiftly removed from Bronx Community College amid a national conversation about the relics — but the school left the bust of one racist scientist in place, The Post has learned.

In a purge for which various officials took credit, the monuments to Confederate leaders Robert E. Lee and Stonewall Jackson unceremoniously disappeared from an open-air sculpture gallery overnight Thursday.

Bronx Borough President Ruben Diaz Jr. has called the presence of Confederate icons in his borough “especially galling,” leading Gov. Cuomo to say they had to go “because New York stands against racism.”College President Thomas Isekenegbe also pledged to replace the busts with other historical figures that would help create a “space where all people feel respected, welcomed, and valued.”

In their rush to remove Confederates and sanitize the school’s “Hall of Fame for Great Americans,” officials left the bronze bust of the racist, 19th-century scientist Louis Agassiz.

The Swiss-born paleontologist landed a professorship at Harvard following a wildly successful American lecture tour in 1846, and he was ­instrumental in establishing the Ivy League school’s Museum of Comparative Zoology, the first publicly funded science building in North America.

Agassiz was the country’s most famous scientist when he died in 1873, but his reputation eventually suffered because of what the University of California Museum of Paleontology calls “his racist attitudes, which were extreme even for his day.”

“Agassiz could not accept that all groups of humans belonged to the same species, and he argued vehemently for the inferiority of non-white human groups,” according to the museum’s Web site.

The move came amid continuing outrage over the deadly violence that erupted at a rally of white supremacists who gathered in Charlottesville, Va., last Saturday to protest the planned removal of a Lee statue.

“That’s pretty f–ked up. We are all people. We bleed the same color,” said Daniel Roman, 20, who was passing through the college campus Friday evening. “Especially with what’s going on in the South, he can go f- -k himself. I’m all about equality.”

 

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By LUCAS MAUTNER
The Joyce B. Cowin Women’s History Gallery
opened recently with an event to honor Cowin’s
contribution to the New York Historical Society.
Louise Mirrer, President, opened with a few
remarks. “I’m really delighted to see so many
of you at this wonderful celebration…and I am
also delighted to welcome you to the Saving
Washington exhibition,” she said.
The Saving Washington exhibition allows
visitors to look at the early days of the United
States through the eyes of the women of
the period. Books, letters, clothing, and other
important artifacts will be on display to the
public, part of a collection of over 150 objects.
“Saving Washington upends the familiar
narrative of our American founding as a power
struggle among men, offering the story of Dolly
Madison, and women of the early republic
more generally, as an example of how women’s
critical but often behind-the-scenes work gave
rise to the nation’s capital as a beacon for the
world,” Mirrer said.
Cowin, addressing the crowd with audible
emotion and pride, said, “In the end, after seeing
all these exceptional persons of our country—
who propelled us ahead—I strongly believe it is
we the people who try to help each other if we
can. We go forward—we build buildings—cre-
ate schools—support hospitals—we the people
go forward. Each of us will have a major trag-
edy in our lives. We mourn, we remember, and
we go forward. We follow the rules, and some
of us make the rules in the end. But it is we the
people that are the driving force of this great
country; we the people go forward.”
Saving Washington is housed in the new
Joyce B. Cowin Women’s History Gallery, in
the newly renovated fourth floor. Its doors will
open fully to the public in late April, where it
will host several programs, from conferences to
writing workshops to panel discussions. Some
of the upcoming events include an unveiling
of the personal archives of Billie Jean King
and a discussion about “Women and the White
House” moderated by 60 Minutes correspon-
dent Lesley Stahl. #
Joyce B. Cowin, an alumna of Teachers
College, Columbia University, is a philan-
thropist and founder of the Cowin Financial
Literacy Project, which aims to improve finan-
cial literacy among students.…

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Date

Sep 6, 2017 • 7:00 PM – 9:00 PM

Cost

FREE and OPEN TO THE PUBLIC!

Location

Gallery at BRIC House

647 Fulton Street
(Enter on Rockwell Place)
Brooklyn, NY 11217

United States
Get Directions

Sergio Purtell, courtesy of the artist and Art 3 Gallery, Brooklyn

JOIN US FOR THE OPENING RECEPTION!

EXHIBITION ON VIEW: September 7 – October 29, 2017

CURATED BY: Elizabeth Ferrer

 

Brooklyn Photographs brings together the work of 11 photographers who have turned their lens on the Brooklyn experience from the late 1960s to the present.  Each of these photographers will present a body of work on a specific theme – childhood in Williamsburg in the 1960s, Halloween in the 1970s, or Bushwick street life in the 1980s, to name a few.  More recent work from the last decade will explore such subjects as the rapidly gentrifying post-industrial landscape, Brooklyn artists, and the microcosm of street life visible near BRIC’s facility at the intersection of Fulton and Flatbush.  In sum, the exhibition will illuminate the important role that photography has had in preserving aspects of Brooklyn’s neighborhoods and traditions, and in documenting the extraordinary cultural and social diversity that is a hallmark of the borough.  It will also reflect the borough as a site of continual change. Neighborhoods transform and new populations emerge, while the essence of Brooklyn’s humanity remains. The exhibition will be accompanied by a catalogue and by public programs.

Photographers include: Yolanda Andrade, Stefanie Apple, Nelson Bakerman, Leigh Davis, Max Kozloff, George Malave, Meryl Meisler, Patrick D. Pagnano, Sergio Purtell, Larry Racioppo, and Russell Frederick .

READ ABOUT THE EXHIBITION IN THE NEW YORK TIMES LENS BLOG >>

Special thanks to Duggal Visual Solutions, Griffin Editions, and Pranayama Art for their services in relation to this exhibition.

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Secret Speakeasy
Prohibition theme!
16mm Short Films, Antiques & Music!
in Soho

Sun Sept 17th
6pm – 10pm All Ages

See 16mm vintage short films
Hear original vinyl records
Enjoy actual prohibition antiques
you can handle and get demonstrated!
Drink and enjoy refreshments!

There will be “nurses” and “doctors” since alcohol is prohibited…unless you have an ailment and require a prescription from the early 1900’s. Choose your ailment
headache, rheumatism, bedwetting or hysteria!

In the spirit of a true Speakeasy
Anything can change so…
Please check this website before leaving.

http://secretspeakeasy.com/

The Museum of Interesting Things
takes over a Soho loft for a special

16mm movie & music fest & party!
Drinks, music & beautiful visuals!
We will bring items from our vast collection of photography / film / prohibition & music items
All eras of history some over 100 years old!
See Old 16mm circus, animations, vaudeville and more

The Museum has a show featuring
Original Rare 16mm short films from the
1940’s, 1950’s and 1960’s
and you get to pick the films allll night!

Early 1900’s and some 1800’s
Stereoviews and Mutoscope cards!

The Loft at Prince Street 177 Prince Street
3rd Floor $10 to help the Museum 🙂
Between Thompson & Sullivan street
in Soho NYC 212 274 8757

This is a loungie place….so please let us know
If you have special needs and require seating.

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From silive.com:

Developer files plans to build on site of 90-year-old Staten Island church

This 1983 photo from the Advance archives shows the original Holy Rosary R.C. Church and adjacent rectory on Sand Lane in South Beach. A developer has filed plans to demolish the church and rectory and build eight semi- attached homes on the property. (Staten Island Advance)
This 1983 photo from the Advance archives shows the original Holy Rosary R.C. Church and adjacent rectory on Sand Lane in South Beach. A developer has filed plans to demolish the church and rectory and build eight semi- attached homes on the property. (Staten Island Advance)
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STATEN ISLAND, N.Y. — A Staten Island developer has filed plans to build eight semi-attached homes on the site of the original Holy Rosary R.C. Church in South Beach.

According to Building Department records, Mitchell Pacifico, a principal of Mp Realty Holding Corp., Travis, who is listed as owner, plans to build eight semi-attached homes over four 45 x 100 lots on Sand Lane.

The lots would be sub-divided from the original parcel at 207 Sand Lane, and the church and adjacent rectory on the site demolished.

Pacifico said he bid on the property after seeing it for sale on the Multiple Listing Service (MLS). He would not disclose the amount, but public records indicate the property sold for $1.5 million.

The new construction would be marketed as Sand Lane Estates. Peter Calvanico, of Calvanico Associates, Willowbrook, is listed as the architect for the project.

Pacifico described the project as “high end” three-bedroom semi-attached homes, with full basements, each with a living room, dining room and eat-in-kitchen. He said construction could begin by early spring.

The 90-year-old stucco and wood-frame church, built by hand by Italian immigrants, is located two blocks from the Franklin Delano Roosevelt Boardwalk in South Beach. It served as a neighborhood mobilization center during Hurricane Sandy in 2012, but has not been used for mass since 2015, according to the Rev. Michael Martine, pastor of Holy Rosary.

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According to the pastor, the church suffered heavy water damage in March 2016 when the original pipes burst, causing water to damage the ceiling and walls. The building was deemed irreparable.

Father Martine said the proceeds from the sale “will greatly improve the financial position of our parish.” He said the money would go toward retiring the debt the parish incurred with the building of the new Holy Rosary Church, at 120 Jerome Ave., in the early 1990s, as well as the Father Dominic Epifano Parish Center across the street, that was built a few years later, in early 2000s. A new boiler will also be purchased for the adjacent Holy Rosary School, which was built in the 1950s.

Holy Rosary has preserved and restored an original hand-carved wooden crucifix as well as a fresco painting that was displayed over the altar in the Sand Lane church. Both are now in the daily mass chapel of the Jerome Avenue church.

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Capturing the Lower East Side’s Disappearing Mom-and-Pop Storefronts, a photography and oral history exhibition, opens tonight, 6pm, at Theater For The New City Gallery, 155 1st Ave [10th]. It’s curated by James and Karla Murray, the husband-and-wife photography team that have documented so many mom-and pop-storefronts, compiled in their books Store Front: The Disappearing Face of New York and its followup.

The show is intended to raise awareness of the essential NYC character that these businesses embody, threatened by skyrocketing rents. You’ll see the work of 30 photographers who participated in two workshops in April and June with the Murrays focusing on neighborhood stores. Since the workshops took place, two of the stores photographed by participants have closed.

The event is free and there will be complimentary wine and beer, as well as small bites, provided by local indie merchants, of course.…

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From Spoiled NYC:

The Sound of Silence: A Tribute To Webster Hall

Subscribe to spoiled NYC’s official newsletter, The Stoop, for the best news, eats, drinks, places to go, and things to do.

For 131 years, Webster Hall has hosted some of the world’s biggest musical acts. Today it closes its doors– at least until it reopens under new ownership, sold in a deal worth an estimated $35 million.

The space, with a maximum capacity of 2,500 people, served as a nightclub, concert venue, corporate events space, and recording studio.

It will reopen in either 2019 or 2020 as the newly christened Spectrum Hall, its space restricted to concerts and sporting events.

I received the phone call in early May. A friend of mine told me management had served all Webster Hall employees with termination notices.

True, it had been a couple of years since I’d set foot in the venue, but a part of me heaved a pained sigh for yet another victim of the city’s changing landscape, for the many dances I’d shared with fellow miscreants who streamed into the place, their wrists ablaze with the shades of kandi bracelets and multi-colored fluffies.

I remembered the faces of the girls I kissed as vividly as I recalled those of the men I kissed– or shyly didn’t kiss. I recoiled at the memory of the crappy wage I made at the time, of the overpriced drinks, the even more overpriced water bottles, a precious commodity in a space that scorched with summer heat even in midwinter.

The people I met there ran the gamut, from frat bros with cockeyed grins, to scene kids with more gumption than me, roadsters who surveyed groups of three or more, code switching and peddling ketamine all the while.

Mirrored behavior existed on the far more spacious dance floor at Amazura Concert Hall in Queens or the even more cramped Electric Warehouse in Brooklyn, and the East Village had long given way to millennial kink, this host of music, bodies, motion, and silent exchanges in bathroom stalls.

“Webster had that old-time New York grunge that made you feel like you were part of the 19th century, in the sense that “fun” could easily involve trying to locate your stolen purse/phone,” says Michael Yates, formerly of Harlem and now living in Los Angeles.

“I’ll miss it. I’m sure the new version of the inside will look fantastic and modern and have a pleasant aroma. Old style Webster Hall was my first immersion into NYC’s EDM scene at the time. It was a place that was magical in the dark, probably because it would look awful when illuminated by sunlight.”

websterhall Having our friend @Halsey visit for an intimate show in the The Studio at Webster Hall tonight before we close for renovations in August. Stay tuned for more surprise shows leading up till then!

The venue, Yates continues, is a “perfect example” of New York City’s infrastructure.

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From Governors Island official calendar: Civil War Weekend 2017
Aug 12, 2017 – Aug 13
10:00 am – 4:30 pm
Governors Island National Monument
Presented by the National Park ServiceMeet Union soldiers in the Soldier’s camp, watch musket and artillery firing demonstrations, and listen to Civil War music performances!

Artillery Demonstration and Small Arms Demonstration
Watch us fire a real 1860s-era cannon and demonstrate a variety of muskets soldiers would have used during that time period.

Getting There
5 Minutes from Soissons Landing 10 Minutes from Yankee Pier
3 Minutes from Soissons Landing 5 Minutes from Yankee Pier

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Through the month of August, Ace Hotel will display key objects from our permanent collection in their Gallery Annex. See relics of New York, including terracotta fragments of landmark skyscrapers, geological specimens from the 2nd Avenue Subway, an artifact from one of the last surviving coal-fired pizza ovens in NYC, and cultural ephemera spanning from Coney Island to the Bronx.

Join us for complimentary wine and a live DJ set at 7 PM tomorrow, August 2 as we kick off this exciting new off-site exhibition! RSVP with Ace is suggested but not required.

Ace Hotel is located at 20 W29th St. in Manhattan.…

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