Category:

19th Century

 E-mailed newsletter from Denny Daniel:
Hi Hi!

It was hard to pick interesting things for this monthly news thingy. We got some really cool stuff! Scroll down to see some. I have been posting really cool stuff on our Instagram & FB & Twitter like our Tesla show (where I met his oldest relative) and new box openings 🙂 Below is also info on Museum show Themes and Booking info of course too 🙂

And best of all the Summer of Love Secret Speakeasy and 3D VHS fest coming up and so many more shows!

– Sun July 23rd, 2017 6pm-10pm all ages
is the Museum Summer of Love Secret Speakeasy

We will debut vintage 16mm films of Bob Dylan, The Beatles, Jefferson Airplane and more! And have clothes you take selfies with!
http://www.secretspeakeasy.com/

** If you want the Museum to come to you or to visit see below or just email or call.

– Thur July 20th, 2017 7pm we are at the City Reliquary for a 3D VHS fest! Our 1st there!
https://www.facebook.com/events/1928505230514357/?acontext=%7B%22ref%22%3A%2222%22%2C%22feed_story_type%22%3A%2222%22%2C%22action_history%22%3A%22null%22%7D&pnref=story

– Sat July 15th, 2017 5pm-7pm the Adventure Club (the coolest site!) has our 16mm Jazz fest
https://www.eventbrite.com/e/the-history-of-film-through-short-film-screenings-rare-16mm-jazz-soundies-registration-35356195332

Cool News! someone came to the Speakeasy and did a wonderful article and video.
http://bedfordandbowery.com/2017/06/the-museum-of-interesting-things-is-a-roving-speakeasy-run-by-a-quirky-curator/

The Museum got some cool new things (I put some pics below for you to check out)

You can now visit our offices on Broadway!  woohoo 🙂
Details are below to schedule a visit here or to have the Museum come to you.

I send only 1 email a month but if you wanna see more pics, events or learn more interesting things then FB the Museum. 🙂 
https://www.facebook.com/museumthings

NOW WE HAVE Instagram
https://www.instagram.com/museumthings/

And even Twitter! (using carrier pigeon of course!)
https://twitter.com/dennydaniel

– Teachers/Event gurus, Librarians, humans, the Museum has sooo many new items and themed exhibitions in nearly every subject from science to history / music to photography and more that we can bring to your school or event email or call.
We have some great themes listed below like Eureka! The History of Invention, The Windup Circus & the 16mm Sing-A-Long and other 16mm festivals like music, jazz, Animation, Space and WW2,  The History of Communication, photography, the 3D VHS fest, also science, Suffragettes, WW2/cold war antiques and any era of history and even math and music!

Dennydanielx@gmail.com 212 274 8757
www.museumofinterestingthings.com

– Here are some library shows, Mineola Libr Jul 22 10-5, Port Jeff Libr 11am adults & 2pm kids July 29th Roosevelt Library Aug 1 at 1pm .

– Also, scroll down, we are partnering with many companies to get you guys discounts on food and things like Doc Mac & TAJ AND our newest partner a 10% discount at Once Upon A Tart if you mention the Museum, see below 🙂

– Last but certainly not least…More More More New Things are below too! Soon we will launch our YouTube channel with Box Openings and more! Stay tuned….

More details for everything below  🙂

Hope to catch ya sooooon!

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Officially releasing on July 15th, the book Secret Brooklyn: An Unusual Guide is written and photographed by Untapped Cities founder Michelle Young and co-founder Augustin Pasquet. To celebrate, we’ll be hosting a launch party for the book on Thursday, July 13th at the Brooklyn Superhero Supply Co., one of the 100+ amazing places in this book.

The party is produced in partnership with the website Brokelyn and will feature a presentation by Michelle and Augustin about their favorite spots and the process of making this book. Refreshments will be served and there will be opportunity to purchase books, get them autographed and meet the authors.

Entry is free, but RSVP is required:

Book Now

Can’t make the event? Purchase the book on Amazon here: http://amzn.to/2tVS4r9

Here’s a little preview of what’s inside:

Discover secret museums, go on an urban safari for wild parrots, locate a landmarked tree, enter the oldest building in New York City, watch a performance of robots in a church, stand tall next to hobbit doors on an otherwise normal residential street, learn how to breathe fire, swallow swords, hammer a nail into your skull and charm a snake, touch the oldest subway tunnel in the world and the world’s smallest Torah, forage for food in Prospect Park, taste wine atop the world’s first commercial rooftop vineyard, step inside a grocery store frozen in 1939, take in a basketball game inside a historic movie theater.

Brooklyn offers countless opportunities to step off the beaten path and is home to any number of well-hidden treasures that are revealed only to residents and travelers who are ready to explore. Secret Brooklyn An Unusual Guide is an indispensable guide for those who think they already know Brooklyn or would like to discover its hidden places, taking you far from the crowds and the usual clichés.

 Brooklyn Superhero Supply Co., Secret Brooklyn: An Unusual Guid

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The Grand Neptune Ball

Open Bar. Live Band. High Seas. (A Fundraiser.)

A celebration on the historic Waterfront Museum Barge –  a boat and nonprofit that is raising funds for renewed arts and education programs after our Superstorm Sandy refit.

Join us for free local fare and spirits! And for the midsummer sunset! Come to dance to live jazz! Come as your most extravagant self! Come support arts and education aboard the historic barge!! Cocktail attire, and any a nod to the maritime 1920s, is encouraged. Music by Steve Oates and the Zac Greenberg Quartet.

The Waterfront Barge
July 22, 2017 at 8-11pm
290 Conover St. Brooklyn, NY
Tickets $50 – $100 (Tax-deductible)

Tickets can be purchased here and at the door.

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Our New Exhibit begins : July 11

Controversial  elections, voting rights, abolition and slavery!  In 1820s New York, while these issues burned in  the minds of the public—newspapers exploded  and competed  as  forums for debate!    This exhibit looks at the newly exploding  newspaper industry  of the 1820s –and the entry of  women and African Americans into the business of print.

At Mount Vernon Hotel Museum & Garden

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From The New York Times:

Photo

The railroad station at Westchester Avenue was designed by Cass Gilbert and is considered endangered. Credit Left, Library of Congress; Nicole Bengiveno/The New York Times

Built in 1908 and designed by Cass Gilbert, those that have not been demolished are near collapse, like the Westchester Avenue station. It is a sublime glazed terra-cotta temple, its little tragedy now exposed on all four sides with the opening of the new Concrete Plant Park.

A dozen stations were projected in 1904, when the railroad began upgrading the Harlem River Branch from the southern Bronx up to New Rochelle. But not all were built and, in addition to Westchester Avenue, three survive today: Morris Park, Hunts Point Avenue and City Island, which is a ruined shell. (The historian Joseph Brennan has closely investigated the stations and has posted his research at columbia.edu/~brennan.)

Gilbert, newly minted as a starchitect with the 1899 commission for the United States Custom House at Bowling Green, got the job of designing the stations, and gave them widely different styles.

The Morris Park station was chunky and low, with arched windows framed by brightly colored terra-cotta bands that also ran under the eaves. Oddly shaped iron torchiers gave it something of the feel of the Secession style as practiced contemporaneously in Austria, although Gilbert was anything but adventurous.

Photo

The Morris Park station as it appeared in 1915 and today. Credit Top, Library of Congress; Nicole Bengiveno/The New York Times

That said, his Westchester Avenue and Hunts Point Avenue stations are particularly striking. At Westchester Avenue the station projects out over the tracks, and so floats on a frame of steel. At street level, high above the rails, the main tower is a little display case of glazed terra cotta, cream-colored panels set off by colored floral medallions, lozenges and crisscross bands in gold, azure and dark red.

It is hard to decipher from old photographs and present conditions, but the portion over the tracks looks as if the terra-cotta panels were framed in iron straps. These must have been painted, but are now pure rust, giving the building a strange, skeletal aspect.

The Hunts Point Avenue station, just visible from the northbound Bruckner Expressway, bridges the tracks from one side to the other, along the avenue. French Renaissance in style, it might have been the royal stable of a French king. The delicate copper roof cresting had spikes big enough to impale an ox, and below run lines of little scalloped dormers.

In 1909, The Real Estate Record and Guide noted the “marked architectural beauty” of the new stations. John A. Droege, in his 1916 book “Passenger Terminals and Trains” (McGraw-Hill) noted that “the ordinary wayside passenger station is not the proper field for the architect who wishes to rival the designer of the Paris opera house.” But he reviewed Gilbert’s stations in depth, apparently with approval.…

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JUN24

Victorian Picnic – June 24, 2017 (RAIN DATE: JULY 8)

Public

  • Saturday, June 24 at 1:00 PM5:00 PM EDT
    Starts in about 6 hours · 23° Heavy Rain
  • pin

    Central Park

    5 Av To Central Park W, 59 St To 110 St, Manhattan, New York 10022Saturday, June 24, 2017
    1:00 p.m.
    meet at 103rd Street and Central Park West
    RAIN DATE:
    Saturday, July 8IF IT RAINS, WE WILL ANNOUNCE RESCHEDULING PLANS BY 10:30 AM

    As the sunny days grow longer, one often desires a happy excursion to whittle away the hours with friends. What better way to do so than with a Victorian picnic? Join the New York 19th Century Society for an afternoon of dining al fresco, good conversation, reading aloud, lawn games of the gentler sort, and photography.

    Bring food or drink to share. Suggested attire (not required): summer whites, garden party frocks, tea dress, steampunk, Goth, or Lolita.

    We will gather at 103rd Street and Central Park West. Once everyone is assembled, we’ll find a quiet meadow in the North Woods nearby to spread our blankets and enjoy food and drink.

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A Description of the New York Central Park, with Maureen Meister, art historian, professor, and author.

Thursday, June 15, 2017, 6:30 p.m.

Program Locations:

Fully accessible to wheelchairs
First come, first served

This illustrated lecture reintroduces readers to A Description of the New York Central Park, published in 1869 and widely considered the most important book about the park to appear during its early years.

Events at The New York Public Library may be photographed or recorded. By attending these events, you consent to the use of your image and voice by the Library for all purposes.

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New York Now Scavenger Hunt
Saturday, June 17, 2017
Check-in: 10:00 AM – 12:00 PM
Hunt: 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Closing Reception: 5:30 – 7:30 PM

Open House New York challenges you to show how much you know about New York’s recent past!

A lot has changed in New York City since the first Open House New York Weekend took place on October 11 and 12, 2003. From the High Line and Hudson Yards to Citibike and the Second Avenue Subway, the city and our experience of it has changed dramatically over the past fifteen years. 40,000 new buildings were built, 450 miles of new bike lanes were laid, and more than a third of New York’s neighborhoods were rezoned.

Through it all, Open House New York was there, opening doors and giving New Yorkers access to the changing city. Now Open House New York invites you to test your knowledge about this vibrant and volatile period in New York’s history! To celebrate the 15th anniversary of OHNY Weekend, Open House New York has organized a citywide scavenger hunt of recent architecture, planning, and development. Travel the five boroughs while answering clues that send you to New York’s most breathtaking new buildings. Relive some of the city’s most heated preservation battles and uncover the policies and politics that shaped contemporary New York. Join us in celebrating a city that remains the greatest metropolis in the world!

To learn more about how the hunt works, click here.

Closing Reception Hosted by

Registration
$35 per person. Advance registration is required, and early registration is encouraged as the number of participating teams is limited.

REGISTER TODAY

 

 

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sat 5pm: take in the view of the manhattan skyline as participants (maybe
you?) sound their own barbaric yawp during the 13th annual marathon
reading of walt whitman’s ‘song of myself.’ brooklyn bridge park’s granite
prospect, free.

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(Sold Out) The Victorian Cult of Mourning

Saturday, June 10, 12:00 pm5:00 pm

This event is sold out. Make sure you never miss out on tickets again! Green-Wood members get access to tickets weeks before the general public. Join today.

Become an Expert in the Fascinating Arts, Crafts, and Culture of Victorian Mourning

victorian-cult-of-mourningNo one knew how to grieve like the Victorians. The elaborate and often downright weird rituals of the era – inspired by Queen Victoria who publicly mourned her husband’s death for forty years – provide a fascinating look at a culture for whom death was ever present. In the United States, losses from the Civil War eclipsed 600,000 deaths, or two percent of the entire population. Death was everywhere. Mourning was an art form. Widows dressed in black from head to toe for an entire year. Household mirrors were covered and clocks were stopped when a death occurred. Women created and wore intricate jewelry made from the hair of the deceased. And rural cemeteries were established across America. Green-Wood is one such example, which by the 1860’s drew over 500,000 visitors a year who came to see the cemetery’s collection of ornate monuments and mausoleums.

Join us for an afternoon symposium devoted to exploring the arts and culture of Victorian mourning with illustrated talks and show-and-tell presentations of period artifacts. Speakers will include Dr. Stanley Burns, M.D., founder of the Burns Archive of photographic history and professor of medicine and psychiatry at NYU Langone Medical Center, Green-Wood Historian Jeff Richman, Evan Michelson, co-owner of Obscura Antiques & Oddities and host of the Science Channel’s Oddities, funeral director Amy Cunningham, Jessica Glasscock, Research Associate for the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s “Death Becomes Her” Exhibition, and more!

This symposium is organized in partnership with Joanna Ebenstein, co-founder of the former Museum of Morbid Anatomy and Laetitia Barbier, former librarian of the Museum.

SCHEDULE

12:00-12:30: Introductions by Harry Weil, Manager of Programs at Green-Wood Cemetery and Joanna Ebenstein and Laetitia Barbier of the recently shuttered Morbid Anatomy Museum

12:30-1:10: An Illustrated History of Green-Wood Cemetery with Jeff Richman, Historian of Green-Wood Cemetery

1:10-2:00: Victorian Hair Jewelry and Artifact Art Show and Tell with Evan Michelson of Obscura Antiques and TV’s Oddities and master jeweler and hair artist Karen Bachmann

Lunch Break

3:00-3:30: Mourning at the Museum: An overview of the recent exhibition Death Becomes Her, focusing on the evolution of mourning attire from 1815 to 1915, with Jessica Glasscock, Research Associate at The Costume Institute at The Metropolitan Museum of Art

3:30-4:30: Dr. Stanley B. Burns, Founder of The Burns Archive and author of “Sleeping Beauty,” in conversation with Joanna Ebenstein, founder of Morbid Anatomy

4:30-5:00: Dramatic readings of 19th century condolence letters overseen by Funeral Director Amy Cunningham

5:00-7:00 Thematic music and refreshments provided by Friese Undine

$20 for members of Green-Wood and BHS / $25 for nonmembers

Click here for our inclement weather policy.

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