Category:

19th Century

The page, http://www.vintag.es/2015/11/rarely-seen-autochrome-photos-of-new.html , claims to display

Rarely Seen Autochrome Photos of New York in the Early 20th Century .

The images themselves span 18 years, from the earliest one dated with the year 1900, to the last, a photo of buildings with banners and signs exhorting the public to buy war bonds, with the date given as 1918. Not all of them are from New York City, several are attributed to places in Upstate New York. Though they are lovely to look at, and a few provide a glimpse of what everyday life for everyday people looked like in the thick of NYC, some people who have written into the comments section have revealed that the provenance of the images is not in all cases what the site represented them to be: some are not genuine Autochrome images at all, but colorized photos or lantern slides, and the one of two men playing chess was reportedly taken in Germany, not New York. Here are the comments, correcting some of the attributions of the images:

Some of these are not original autochromes but colorised black and white photos, e.g. the couple in Saratoga Springs, which is a detail from a colorisation by Sanna Dullaway: http://sannadullaway.com/0r…

Avatar

A number of critical errors. Image #1 (from the top down) is not an autochrome. Images #2 & 3 are autochromes by Charles Zoller (Rochester, NY). Image #4 is not an autochrome. Image #5 ( Foolish House) is an autochrome by Zoller. Images 6, 7, 8, & 9 are not autochromes. Image #10 (rooftops) is an autochrome in the collection of Wm. B. Becker and should be credited to him. Images 11, 12, 13, & 14 are by Zoller. All the Zoller autochromes are owned by the George Eastman Museum and should be credited to them. Image # 15 (chess players) is probably by Alfred Stieglitz or possibly by Edward Steichen and was taken in Germany. The last image (war bond rally) is an autochrome by J. D. Willis from the collection of Mark Jacobs.
Nearly all the non-autochrome images identified in this post are actually black & white lantern slides that have been digitally colored

 

  • Avatar

    Right! 6-7-8-9 are not color photographs at all, but Photochrom prints made from black and white negatives. You can see the originals online at the Library of Congress — the process is explained here: http://www.loc.gov/pictures…

    And if you’re interested in real Autochromes, including the rare New York rooftops image (#10 above), see the original postings online at the American Museum of Photography: http://photographymuseum.co…

 

 

 …

Continue reading

From The Observer

By Ann Votaw 10/20/2017

I have a soft spot for cemeteries.

Recently, I posted an Instagram photo of a crumbling headstone and got a like from Jolene Lupo, a stranger of the alive variety.

But upon closer inspection of her profile pic—a black and white of a marble-eyed brunette—I wondered if Lupo might not be a phantom.

My sleuthing revealed Lupo was not a hallucination but the tintype studio manager of Penumbra Foundation, a Manhattan nonprofit dedicated to historical photography. The more I scrolled through her feed, the more I became enchanted with tintypes—kind-of like metal Polaroids of the mid-1800s.

As the child of antique fanatics, I grew up going to flea markets. Yet I was familiar with tintypes of whiskered soldiers, not the bearded hipsters I saw on Penumbra’s accounts.

Continue reading

Description

Following the trauma of the Civil War, the intersection of mourning on a national scale with the new technology of photography gave rise to a chilling phenomenon: “spirit photography,” the supposed art of capturing departed loved ones on film. Author and curator of religion at the National Museum of American History, Peter Manseau, shares the story of infamous spirit photographer William Mumler, the fraud allegations that haunted him, and a nation grasping for the promise of the afterlife.

Book Talk: The Apparitionists: A Tale of Phantoms, Fraud, Photography, and the Man Who Captured Lincoln’s Ghost
Tuesday, October 24
Doors: 6:00 pm
Event: 6:30 pm
$5 General Admission / Free for Members

BHS Members: to reserve tickets at the member price, click on “Tickets” and enter your Member ID on the following page after clicking on “Enter Promotional Code.”

Date and Time

Tue, October 24, 2017

6:30 PM – 8:00 PM EDT

Add to Calendar

Location

Brooklyn Historical Society

128 Pierrepont St

Brooklyn, NY 11201

View Map

REFUND POLICY Brooklyn Historical Society requires 24 hours notice before the date of the event to refund a ticket. No refunds are provided after that point. No refunds are provided on the day of the event and all subsequent days.

Continue reading

Fashionably Strange: A History of Victorian Creepiness

October 22
Public

Hosted by Quimby’s Bookstore

Sunday, October 22 at 8:00 PM – 9:00 PM EDT
2 days from now · 17–22°Partly Cloudy
Details
Fashionably Strange: A History of Victorian Creepiness
A talk/slide show by J.R. Pepper
“There’s a general consensus in film and media that Victorians were a bit… odd to say the least. But what did they do that made them so odd, so strange, so creepy?
From professional mourning clothing, taxidermy, and an obsession with death to bizarre photography and fashionable communication with the spirit world, there’s no doubt that the Victorians were decidedly creepy. In this talk we will explore what made the Victorians the true masters of the macabre.”…

Continue reading

With the New York Adventure Club:

Behind-the-Scenes @ Woodlawn Cemetery & Locked Gilded Age Family Mausoleums

Step inside some of the country’s most opulent family mausoleums that are rarely unlocked for the public, until now.

Join New York Adventure Club for an exclusive, behind-the-scenes experience at Woodlawn Cemetery, one of the largest cemeteries in New York City covering more than 400 acres and serving as the resting place for more than 300,000 people.

Sat. Oct. 21: 3pm-5pm

Woodlawn Conservancy

3800 Jerome Avenue

Bronx, NY 10467

Led by a cemetery docent, our unique experience will include:

 

  • The history and story of Woodlawn Cemetery, and how it became the favored cemetery of so many prominent NYC families from the late 1800s to early 1900s
  • An exploration of the cemetery’s grounds to see some of its most notable mausoleums, sculptures, and landscapes
  • Exclusive access inside some of its most impressive Gilded Age family mausoleums including Harkness, Harbeck, and Dunlop, which contain Tiffany glass, Italian marble, and even a dead parrot

 

Click here to see pictures from one of our last trips to Woodlawn Cemetery!

* Please bring a good pair of walking shoes since we’ll be on our feet for the entirety of the tour!

 


 

Disclaimer

By attending a New York Adventure Club experience, you accept our terms of service.

Categories: Tours, Active, Historic Sites

Continue reading

From Thought Gallery NYC:
After the city’s Halloween festivities come to an end, New Yorkers will still be able to get a look at the city’s haunted histories at New York: City of the Dead on November 9, which offers an overview of the city’s cemeteries – including the secret ones hidden in some unlikely places.…

Continue reading

From Thought Gallery NYC:
New Yorkers can get out to Queens this fall for walks exploring Steinway Village (November 18) or Richmond Hill North (November 11), a Victorian village that was one of the first suburban communities. The Municipal Art Society will also offer a tour of the South Bronx and its history and recent revival on November 19.…

Continue reading

Lower Manhattan is where the Dutch settled, George Washington was inaugurated, and Alexander Hamilton has his final resting place. Learn about the history of the area on a Lower Manhattan History Walk on October 21…  To learn about the area’s seedier underbelly, catch the history of crime in NYC on October 21. A separate walking tour on October 28 will put Wall Street and great financial crashes at the forefront.…

Continue reading

Copyright © 2011-2017 Bygone NYC - All Rights Reserved