Category:

19th Century

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DATE AND TIME

Mon, February 12, 2018

6:30 PM – 8:00 PM EST

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LOCATION

Institute Of Culinary Education

225 Liberty Street

3rd Floor

New York, NY 10281

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DESCRIPTION

New York City has been a hub of chocolate manufacturing for centuries. In the mid-1700s, small, independent producers ground cocoa beans for local neighborhoods; later, chocolate was produced in mills that also turned out flour, mustard, oils, and paints; and in the nineteenth century, chocolate manufacturers clustered in lower Manhattan, creating a golden age of chocolate production in New York. But as smaller firms were absorbed by larger ones, and as manufacturing of all kinds left Manhattan, chocolate manufacturing disappeared, only to return decades later with the recent rise of small-batch craft producers. Michael Laiskonis will discuss how chocolate making in New York came full circle.

A chocolate tasting will precede the talk.

Michael Laiskonis was Executive Pastry Chef at Le Bernardin restaurant for eight years. He teaches and mentors future chefs, writes about food, and consults for major food industry companies. Michael Laiskonis launched the bean-to-bar Chocolate Lab at ICE in 2015.

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When: Saturday, February 10, 12:00pm – 1:00pm
Price: Free with Museum admission

As part of the Black Gotham Experience day at the Museum, a panel of experts will discuss early Black communities in New York City.

Dating back to the 1600’s, before New York was New York, free and enslaved residents of African descent were integral contributors to the growing metropolis. As we take a look back at early Black communities such as New Amsterdam, Weeksville, and Seneca Village in the 17th through 19th century, join a lively conversation with Dr. Prathibha Kanakamedala, curator of In Pursuit of Freedom, Kamau Ware, Founder of the Black Gotham Experience, and professor Dr. Deborah Gray White to make connections between these legacies through today. Moderator Sarah Seidman will guide a conversation to unpack the the daily lives, means of organization, and early efforts for Black liberation.

This panel is part of a larger program, which includes a performance by The American Slavery Project at 11:00 am. Learn more.


 

About the Moderator:

Dr. Sarah Seidman is the Puffin Foundation Curator of Social Activism at the Museum of the City of New York. She curates the ongoing exhibition Activist New York, and has also curated Beyond Suffrage and King in New York at the Museum. She holds a Ph.D. in American Studies and an M.A. in Public Humanities from Brown University and a B.A. in American Studies from Wesleyan University. Her research centers around questions of political culture, race, and social movements in the United States and the world. She has received fellowships from the University of Rochester, New York University, and the American Council of Learned Societies, and her writing has appeared in the Journal of Transnational American Studies and The Sixties: A Journal of History, Politics and Culture, among other places.

About the Panelists:

Dr. Prithi Kanakamedala specializes in the Black Atlantic during the long  nineteenth century. Her more recent scholarship examines New York’s free black communities. She has published on a number of topics including black identity in nineteenth century transatlantic performance culture, New York’s cultural heritage, and the labor history of the Brooklyn Bridge. Dr. Kanakamedala is a committed public historian and served as both historian and curator for In Pursuit of Freedom (www.pursuitoffreedom.org), a partnership of Brooklyn Historical Society, Weeksville Heritage Center, and Irondale Ensemble Project. The project traced Brooklyn’s anti-slavery movement. She continues to work with a number of non-profits including City Lore/ Place Matters and the Brooklyn Historical Society. She received her PhD in Atlantic Studies from the University of Sussex, England and is originally from Liverpool, England.

Kamau Ware (b. 1974) is a Brooklyn-based visual artist born in Pittsburgh, PA. His work focuses on visual storytelling by using photography, history, and fantasy to produce moving narratives about people and spaces. His works include America: The Legacy of African American Legacy, Arsenal Gallery, New York, NY (2016); #INSIDEBLACKGOTHAM, Civil Service Cafe, Brooklyn, NY (2015); Exposed, Sweet Lorraine Gallery, Brooklyn, NY (2014); and Bed Stuy Story, Warehouse Gallery, Brooklyn, NY (2014).

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From The New York Times:

A shabbily dressed man walked into an opulent restaurant. It was the 1970s, when people still made a sartorial effort for a night out in Manhattan. Alone, he took a seat in the lounge.

The restaurant’s owner, Laura Maioglio, wasn’t wearing her glasses, so her vision was blurry. She didn’t think much of the visitor. But her widowed mother, Piera Maioglio, who was with her, did. “Oh, that poor person, he doesn’t look like he can afford Barbetta,” Piera told her daughter.

Together they observed the man from their usual table in the back of the 100-seat dining room, lit by a majestic chandelier built in 1775, acquired from a palazzo in Turin, Italy.

A Barbetta menu from that era, at the New York Public Library in the Manuscripts, Archives, and Rare Book Division, lists roast rack of lamb for two for $14.50. There was an additional 75-cent cover charge. Back then, it would have cost at least $20 a head for dinner with wine, plus an extra $2 to $3 for shavings of white truffle flown in from Piedmont, in Northern Italy. Dinner would easily cost about $150 for two today.

Piera, who was extremely beautiful, Laura recalled — “a cross between Marlene Dietrich and Greta Garbo” — instructed a waiter to bring the man a menu to alert him what he was in for. Once he saw the prices, she thought, he could make a face-saving excuse to leave and not have to skulk out after being seated in the dining room.

The Maioglio women had been watching over the theater district Italian restaurant, at 321 West 46th Street, since 1962. That was the year Piera’s husband and Barbetta’s founder, Sebastiano Maioglio, died at the age of 82. Laura was their only child.

The man didn’t budge after glancing at the menu, contending that he was waiting for three friends.

Laura went to take a closer look. It was Mick Jagger.

“Who’s Mick Jagger?” Piera asked.

“He’s with the Rolling Stones,” Laura said.

“Who are the Rolling Stones?” asked Piera.

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Photo

The Rolling Stones and Andy Warhol were regulars at Barbetta in the ’70s. More recently, the Clintons and Lin-Manuel Miranda have stopped by. Credit Dina Litovsky for The New York Times

These days at Barbetta, most guests dress casually. On a recent evening, Rick Miramontez, the press agent for “Hello, Dolly!” and “Springsteen on Broadway,” sat tie-less in the lounge, something he would not have dared to do when he visited for the first time in 1979. “It was very dressy, very starched, a necktie place through the ’80s, no question,” he said.

Indeed, from its townhouse exterior to its brocade chairs and swag curtains, Barbetta is a throwback to the days of the fancy restaurant.

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Friday, February 2nd, 2018 1pm to 8pm

Saturday, February 3rd, 2018 11am-6pm

At The Metropolitan Pavilion, 125 W 18th street (between 6th & 7th Avenues)

$15/at the door

Buy tickets via the website: http://manhattanvintage.com/upcoming-shows/

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Friday
Jan 19
Greenwich Village
New Yorkers have a tendency to romanticize bygone eras of city history: the jazzy ’20s; the gritty ’70s; or even the simpler times of the early 2010s. This weekend, the New Ohio Theatre on Christopher Street will re-create an iconic slab of ’60s infamy — the artist-haunted Chelsea Hotel. There will be cheap drinks, old tunes, and photographers shooting on film, all meant to evoke the infamous hotel. We suggest you read Patti Smith’s Just Kids to prepare.
Cost: $20 suggested donation at the door.

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from Lost City:

04 September 2012

Lascoff Drugs Closes After a 113 Years

I thought upper Lexington Avenue had a special force field surrounding it (i.e.—influential rich people) that allowed an inordinate number of old businesses to survive. But, alas, I was wrong. If the bluebloods couldn’t save the iconic Upper East Side pharmacy Lascoff Drugs, what can they save?
Lascoff closed last July after 113 years in business. I don’t know how I missed that. I guess lately I’ve unconsciously learned to avert my eyes when beautiful landmarks shutter. I just can’t bear the pain.
Lascoff, along with Bigelow and one or two others, was one of New York’s great, classic pharmacies. It opened in 1899, when McKinley was President, and was the first licensed pharmacy in New York State, according to the New York Times. It was a store so majestic and solemn, you felt like you were entering a church when you went in. High ceilings, high shelving, a balcony, ancient Pharmacuetical relics, and silence. No music. You could find many old and classic brands there that you couldn’t locate elsewhere. And the vertical sign on the corner building was one of the grandest in the city.
The enterprise was founded by J. Leon Lascoff. He was born in Vilna, then in Russian Poland, and came to New York in 1892. His first drug store was at Lex and 83rd. He then moved across the street and then, in 1931, moved to 82nd and Lex—Lascoff’s final location. He died in 1936. His son Frederick took over the business and ran it until his death in 1970. During Fred’s time, the store had a reputation for odd cures. It sold leeches to boxers and catnip oil to lion hunters. He once sold a mixture of phenol, valerian, asafetida and iodoform to a colleague who had complained that his own pharmacy didn’t smell enough like a drug store.
After Frederick died, the business fell out of the family. It was purchased by Phil and Susan Ragusa. I assume they were still running it when it closed.

2 comments:

upstate johnny g said…

Aaarrrgggghhhhhh!!!!!!!! Another icon, another living link to the past, another glorious example of how time travel is almost possible, is closed. My girlfriend and I popped by Lascoff one morning this past summer and even though it was a weekday, they were closed. We didn’t quite get it, because we’d been there before and business seemed healthy enough. Brooks, we have you to thank for turning us on to Lascoff’s in the first place with your great posting about that neighborhood. We would go to Lascoff’s and then pop over to the Lexington Candy Shop to have a real burger and a Coke made with actual Coke syrup and carbonated water, mixed with a spoon by the fountain guy. Your Yorkville guide opened all of this up to us. Thanks.

Do you have any idea what will become of Lascoff’s?

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From Walter Grutchfield.net:

FThe J. M. Horton Ice Cream Company
back  The J. M. Horton Ice Cream Company, 302 Columbus Ave. New York, 2009   next
The J. M. Horton
Ice Cream Company
In 1860 James M. Horton was listed in Trow’s New York City Directory as an agent for the Orange County Milk Association.

In the 1861 New York city directory this ad for the Orange County Milk Association listed James M. Horton as president of the company. It also says that the company was organized in 1842 and incorporated 1 May 1860.

By 1873 James M. Horton was listed at 305 Fourth Ave., 1264 Broadway and 77 Chatham St., New York City. These, apparently, were the earliest locations of the J. M. Horton Ice Cream Co.

305 Fourth Ave.and 1264 Broadway are on this Horton’s Ice Cream ad from 1877.

305 Fourth Ave. and 75 Chatham St. are also on this Horton’s Ice Cream ad from 1879. 305 Fourth Ave. remained a Horton address from 1873 through 1914.

302 Columbus Ave. first appeared in directories in 1892 and remained a Horton location through 1922.

An F.Y.I. article in the New York Times, 19 March 2000, by Daniel B. Schneider, had this to say regarding 302 Columbus Ave., “At the turn of the 19th century, when the building at 302 Columbus was erected, the Horton company was supplying over half of New York City’s ice cream, but like other small local producers it was ultimately unable to compete with larger, more mechanized operations and by 1930 was absorbed by the Pioneer Ice Cream Division of Borden. Most building construction on Columbus Avenue followed the arrival of the Ninth Avenue el in 1881, and the fancy pediments on many former factory buildings were originally intended as rooftop advertisements, to be seen by riders on the trains passing overhead but all but invisible from the sidewalk below.”

The founder of the J. M. Horton Ice Cream Company was James Madison Horton (1835-1914). His obituary in the New York Times, 27 June 1914, read, “James Madison Horton, the well-known ice cream manufacturer, died yesterday at his home, 112 West 126th Street, at the age of 79. Mr. Horton was born on a farm near Middletown, N. Y., and in 1853 came to this city with his brother to engage in the milk business. From 1858 to 1869 he was President of the Orange County Milk Association and in 1870 first started in the ice cream business. He bought out a small business and reorganized it under the name of J. M. Horton & Co. In 1873 the firm was again reorganized, this time becoming the J. M. Horton Ice Cream Company, with a nominal capital of $40,000, and Mr. Horton became its President and chief stockholder. From this later start the business grew until today there are six stores and distributing centres in this city and several in Brooklyn. Mr. Horton was largely interested in real estate. In 1912 he transferred eleven pieces of property to his children, James M.…

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Wednesday, December 20, 2017, 6:30 p.m.

Program Locations:

Fully accessible to wheelchairs
Program is free, but advance registration is recommended. Priority will be given to those who have registered in advance.
REGISTER

The oldest building in New York City, the hobbit doors of Dennet Place, a hidden museum in a Williamsburg apartment—Brooklyn is filled with secrets.

Secret Brooklyn book coverAway from the crowds and standard attractions, Brooklyn offers countless offbeat experiences. Michelle Young and Augustin Pasquet, founders of the online magazine Untapped Cities, join us for a conversation their book Secret Brooklyn: An Usual Guide.

After presenting an overview of the borough’s hidden treasures, the authors will discuss their popular website and the power of urban discovery. A Q&A follows.

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At Museum of the City of New York

1220 Fifth Ave at 103rd St., Open Daily 10am–6pm

Back to Exhibitions

From frozen ponds to Madison Square Garden, ice-skating has become a quintessentially New York pastime, woven into the city’s urban fabric in ways large and small.

New York on Ice: Skating in the City invites visitors to explore how ice-skating evolved in the city from its colonial Dutch and British origins to become a 19th-century craze, and later an opportunity for elaborate spectacle, commercialized leisure, and competitive sport in the 20th century and beyond. Along the way, skating has left its mark on New York’s urban landscape, from the design of Central Park, to intimate hotel rinks and extravagant arenas, to a plethora of skating facilities that today define and transform parks and other public spaces across the city.

The story of New York on Ice will be told through vintage photographs, posters, lithographs, paintings, and costumes. Together they reveal the evolution of the sport and art of ice-skating in the city both as a window into a passion and pastime of generations of New Yorkers, and as an unexpected ingredient of urban place-making.

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Victorian Holiday Party

What better way to celebrate the holidays than in a beautiful Victorian home? Enjoy offerings of hot spiced wine, apple cider and cookies while singing along to some traditional Christmas carols! Starting at 5pm, there will be a special radio performance by the Fireside Mystery Theatre. Victorian regalia welcomed! Tickets are $10, $8 Members/Students.

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