Category:

Civil War

From The Observer

By Ann Votaw 10/20/2017

I have a soft spot for cemeteries.

Recently, I posted an Instagram photo of a crumbling headstone and got a like from Jolene Lupo, a stranger of the alive variety.

But upon closer inspection of her profile pic—a black and white of a marble-eyed brunette—I wondered if Lupo might not be a phantom.

My sleuthing revealed Lupo was not a hallucination but the tintype studio manager of Penumbra Foundation, a Manhattan nonprofit dedicated to historical photography. The more I scrolled through her feed, the more I became enchanted with tintypes—kind-of like metal Polaroids of the mid-1800s.

As the child of antique fanatics, I grew up going to flea markets. Yet I was familiar with tintypes of whiskered soldiers, not the bearded hipsters I saw on Penumbra’s accounts.

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Description

Following the trauma of the Civil War, the intersection of mourning on a national scale with the new technology of photography gave rise to a chilling phenomenon: “spirit photography,” the supposed art of capturing departed loved ones on film. Author and curator of religion at the National Museum of American History, Peter Manseau, shares the story of infamous spirit photographer William Mumler, the fraud allegations that haunted him, and a nation grasping for the promise of the afterlife.

Book Talk: The Apparitionists: A Tale of Phantoms, Fraud, Photography, and the Man Who Captured Lincoln’s Ghost
Tuesday, October 24
Doors: 6:00 pm
Event: 6:30 pm
$5 General Admission / Free for Members

BHS Members: to reserve tickets at the member price, click on “Tickets” and enter your Member ID on the following page after clicking on “Enter Promotional Code.”

Date and Time

Tue, October 24, 2017

6:30 PM – 8:00 PM EDT

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Location

Brooklyn Historical Society

128 Pierrepont St

Brooklyn, NY 11201

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REFUND POLICY Brooklyn Historical Society requires 24 hours notice before the date of the event to refund a ticket. No refunds are provided after that point. No refunds are provided on the day of the event and all subsequent days.

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From Thought Gallery NYC:
After the city’s Halloween festivities come to an end, New Yorkers will still be able to get a look at the city’s haunted histories at New York: City of the Dead on November 9, which offers an overview of the city’s cemeteries – including the secret ones hidden in some unlikely places.…

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From The New York Post:

Bronx Community College removes Confederate busts

The busts of two Confederate generals have been swiftly removed from Bronx Community College amid a national conversation about the relics — but the school left the bust of one racist scientist in place, The Post has learned.

In a purge for which various officials took credit, the monuments to Confederate leaders Robert E. Lee and Stonewall Jackson unceremoniously disappeared from an open-air sculpture gallery overnight Thursday.

Bronx Borough President Ruben Diaz Jr. has called the presence of Confederate icons in his borough “especially galling,” leading Gov. Cuomo to say they had to go “because New York stands against racism.”College President Thomas Isekenegbe also pledged to replace the busts with other historical figures that would help create a “space where all people feel respected, welcomed, and valued.”

In their rush to remove Confederates and sanitize the school’s “Hall of Fame for Great Americans,” officials left the bronze bust of the racist, 19th-century scientist Louis Agassiz.

The Swiss-born paleontologist landed a professorship at Harvard following a wildly successful American lecture tour in 1846, and he was ­instrumental in establishing the Ivy League school’s Museum of Comparative Zoology, the first publicly funded science building in North America.

Agassiz was the country’s most famous scientist when he died in 1873, but his reputation eventually suffered because of what the University of California Museum of Paleontology calls “his racist attitudes, which were extreme even for his day.”

“Agassiz could not accept that all groups of humans belonged to the same species, and he argued vehemently for the inferiority of non-white human groups,” according to the museum’s Web site.

The move came amid continuing outrage over the deadly violence that erupted at a rally of white supremacists who gathered in Charlottesville, Va., last Saturday to protest the planned removal of a Lee statue.

“That’s pretty f–ked up. We are all people. We bleed the same color,” said Daniel Roman, 20, who was passing through the college campus Friday evening. “Especially with what’s going on in the South, he can go f- -k himself. I’m all about equality.”

 

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Thu 08 2017 , by

Bygone Stables

From The New York Post:

The fascinating history behind NYC’s stables-turned-real estate

Washington Mews, a little alley north of Washington Square Park, is an urban gem. Still paved with Belgian block and lined with quaint cottages, it’s a Greenwich Village street that might as well be in Europe. In fact, cities like London and Paris are filled with these tiny picturesque thoroughfares, whose cute little homes once stabled horses, carriages and sleighs.

Due to quirks in New York’s history and design, these mews are exceedingly rare in the city, making carriage-house living both scarce and coveted. Often disguised behind modest, original facades, many converted carriage homes contain architectural wonders hidden from view.

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Washington Mews: One of Manhattan’s rare alleys lined with former stables, this stretch was designed to service a row of 1830s homes along Washington Square Park.Annie Wermiel/NY Post

Take investor David Aldea’s home at 23 Cornelia St., which Taylor Swift rented in 2016. The 5,500-square-foot West Village pad was asking $40,000/month then, and is on the market with Corcoran for $24.5 million. Walking down the street, the home’s massive, arched wooden doors hint at its 1912 carriage house origins, but the unprepossessing facade might not stop passersby in their tracks.

Upon entering, however, it’s clear this is no ordinary stable: today, the garden level is graced by a 25-foot swimming pool, while an ornate Murano glass chandelier hangs from double-height ceilings. But, as Aldea notes, despite these modern touches, original details abound, particularly in the living room, where there are “24-inch square windows that would have been for the horses to stick their heads out for ventilation.”

Considering the fact that New York was a horse-and-carriage town for so many centuries, it’s surprising that there aren’t more such conversions. That’s in part because most remnants of the city’s colonial days are long gone. Also, Manhattan’s populated areas used to be far more compact; their borders barely extended north of today’s City Hall until the 1820s. The majority of New Yorkers, it seems, walked almost everywhere nearly two centuries ago.

A new street layout in the first decades of the 19th century helped the city expand, and travel by private carriage became more common — but only for the city’s elite. So few New Yorkers could afford to maintain a horse that when a commission laid out the city’s famous grid in 1811, the plan purposely excluded rear alleys for stables. Even by the Civil War, a mere 3 percent of NYC residents owned their own horses and carriages.

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Annie Wermiel/NY Post

A few early mews still exist. Take Washington Mews, which was erected behind the stately homes of “The Row,” one of New York’s first planned “terraces” of homes — a clear sign that the 1832-built Washington Square townhouses were only for the well-heeled.

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From Governors Island official calendar: Civil War Weekend 2017
Aug 12, 2017 – Aug 13
10:00 am – 4:30 pm
Governors Island National Monument
Presented by the National Park ServiceMeet Union soldiers in the Soldier’s camp, watch musket and artillery firing demonstrations, and listen to Civil War music performances!

Artillery Demonstration and Small Arms Demonstration
Watch us fire a real 1860s-era cannon and demonstrate a variety of muskets soldiers would have used during that time period.

Getting There
5 Minutes from Soissons Landing 10 Minutes from Yankee Pier
3 Minutes from Soissons Landing 5 Minutes from Yankee Pier

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(Sold Out) The Victorian Cult of Mourning

Saturday, June 10, 12:00 pm5:00 pm

This event is sold out. Make sure you never miss out on tickets again! Green-Wood members get access to tickets weeks before the general public. Join today.

Become an Expert in the Fascinating Arts, Crafts, and Culture of Victorian Mourning

victorian-cult-of-mourningNo one knew how to grieve like the Victorians. The elaborate and often downright weird rituals of the era – inspired by Queen Victoria who publicly mourned her husband’s death for forty years – provide a fascinating look at a culture for whom death was ever present. In the United States, losses from the Civil War eclipsed 600,000 deaths, or two percent of the entire population. Death was everywhere. Mourning was an art form. Widows dressed in black from head to toe for an entire year. Household mirrors were covered and clocks were stopped when a death occurred. Women created and wore intricate jewelry made from the hair of the deceased. And rural cemeteries were established across America. Green-Wood is one such example, which by the 1860’s drew over 500,000 visitors a year who came to see the cemetery’s collection of ornate monuments and mausoleums.

Join us for an afternoon symposium devoted to exploring the arts and culture of Victorian mourning with illustrated talks and show-and-tell presentations of period artifacts. Speakers will include Dr. Stanley Burns, M.D., founder of the Burns Archive of photographic history and professor of medicine and psychiatry at NYU Langone Medical Center, Green-Wood Historian Jeff Richman, Evan Michelson, co-owner of Obscura Antiques & Oddities and host of the Science Channel’s Oddities, funeral director Amy Cunningham, Jessica Glasscock, Research Associate for the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s “Death Becomes Her” Exhibition, and more!

This symposium is organized in partnership with Joanna Ebenstein, co-founder of the former Museum of Morbid Anatomy and Laetitia Barbier, former librarian of the Museum.

SCHEDULE

12:00-12:30: Introductions by Harry Weil, Manager of Programs at Green-Wood Cemetery and Joanna Ebenstein and Laetitia Barbier of the recently shuttered Morbid Anatomy Museum

12:30-1:10: An Illustrated History of Green-Wood Cemetery with Jeff Richman, Historian of Green-Wood Cemetery

1:10-2:00: Victorian Hair Jewelry and Artifact Art Show and Tell with Evan Michelson of Obscura Antiques and TV’s Oddities and master jeweler and hair artist Karen Bachmann

Lunch Break

3:00-3:30: Mourning at the Museum: An overview of the recent exhibition Death Becomes Her, focusing on the evolution of mourning attire from 1815 to 1915, with Jessica Glasscock, Research Associate at The Costume Institute at The Metropolitan Museum of Art

3:30-4:30: Dr. Stanley B. Burns, Founder of The Burns Archive and author of “Sleeping Beauty,” in conversation with Joanna Ebenstein, founder of Morbid Anatomy

4:30-5:00: Dramatic readings of 19th century condolence letters overseen by Funeral Director Amy Cunningham

5:00-7:00 Thematic music and refreshments provided by Friese Undine

$20 for members of Green-Wood and BHS / $25 for nonmembers

Click here for our inclement weather policy.

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The Women Who Made New York


Julie Scelfo

Author Event
Thursday April 06, 2017 7:00 PM
(History, Cultural Studies)
Event Description
Read any history of New York City and you will read about men. But that’s not the whole story. Julie Scelfo reveals the untold stories of the phenomenal women who made NYC the cultural epicenter of the world. Many were revolutionaries and activists; others were icons and iconoclasts. Some led quiet lives, but were influential. Scelfo reinvigorates not just New York’s history but its very identity.

Special Instructions
Seating is limited and available on a first-come, first-serve basis. Books can be purchased after signing. If you have questions or concerns, email crm19792@bn.com or ask a bookseller for more information. facebook.com/bnupperwestside

82nd & Broadway

2289 Broadway
New York, NY 10024
212-362-8835

Store Hours:

9-10 Every Day

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from Brooklyn Historical Society:

March 10th: Irish Brooklyn
Éirinn go Brách! Sláinte! Celebrate St. Patrick’s Day a week early with a Free Friday of Irish history, Brooklyn whiskey, and Brooklyn Brewery beers. Enjoy browsing all of our exhibitions and our landmarked library, and sip on a Brooklyn Brewery beer while listening to live music!  The evening’s schedule:

5:00pm-9:00pm Drink-n-draw: chill out with a beer and your creative side!
5:45pm-9:00pm Special library collection items on display featuring Delmonico’s and more!
6:30pm-7:00pm From Potato Famine to Tammany Hall: How the Irish Came to Run New York, a lecture by Elizabeth Stack
7:30pm-8:00pm The Whiskey Wars, a talk and tasting by Kings County Distillery

Think you’ll be able to make it on the 10th? Let us know on Facebook!

Winter/Spring 2017 Free Fridays:
March 10th
April 14th
May 12th

 …

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