Category:

Colonial Period

New York Now Scavenger Hunt
Saturday, June 17, 2017
Check-in: 10:00 AM – 12:00 PM
Hunt: 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Closing Reception: 5:30 – 7:30 PM

Open House New York challenges you to show how much you know about New York’s recent past!

A lot has changed in New York City since the first Open House New York Weekend took place on October 11 and 12, 2003. From the High Line and Hudson Yards to Citibike and the Second Avenue Subway, the city and our experience of it has changed dramatically over the past fifteen years. 40,000 new buildings were built, 450 miles of new bike lanes were laid, and more than a third of New York’s neighborhoods were rezoned.

Through it all, Open House New York was there, opening doors and giving New Yorkers access to the changing city. Now Open House New York invites you to test your knowledge about this vibrant and volatile period in New York’s history! To celebrate the 15th anniversary of OHNY Weekend, Open House New York has organized a citywide scavenger hunt of recent architecture, planning, and development. Travel the five boroughs while answering clues that send you to New York’s most breathtaking new buildings. Relive some of the city’s most heated preservation battles and uncover the policies and politics that shaped contemporary New York. Join us in celebrating a city that remains the greatest metropolis in the world!

To learn more about how the hunt works, click here.

Closing Reception Hosted by

Registration
$35 per person. Advance registration is required, and early registration is encouraged as the number of participating teams is limited.

REGISTER TODAY

 

 

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from the Lo-Down:

Masaryk Towers Closes Rivington Street Gates

masaryk gate closed

There have been some tense moments outside the Masaryk Towers apartment complex this afternoon. The cooperative today carried out a long-expected and controversial plan — closing gates on a de-mapped section of Rivington Street, between Columbia and Pitt streets. The closure cuts off a main passageway used by the neighborhood-at-large to travel throughout the community.

We’re told by people in the area, including District Leader Paul Newell, that the decision is already prompting a big reaction. Newell says the feedback from Masaryk residents is mixed, while sentiment from the larger community is resoundingly negative.

Months ago, Grand Street Settlement expressed serious concerns about the closure. The entrance of the non-profit organization’s senior center is located just beyond the gates, near Pitt Street. Executive Director Robert Cordero was promised by the co-op’s leadership that the community would be advised of the changes well in advance of the closure. There was almost no warning before the gates were shut today. Here’s part of a petition Grand Street Settlement is circulating:

This closure places undo burden on the 4,000+ children, youth, families, and seniors who visit our center (including those who reside in Masaryk Towers). We are especially worried about our seniors who live in Baruch Houses on the East River and have limited mobility. On May 4th, Grand St. Settlement received the following notice that the gates will be closed from Bernice McCallum, Chair of Masaryk Board of Directors: “This is an update regarding the closing of the gates.  The Board of Masaryk Towers decided to close the gates.  The gate closure is one of the many measures Masaryk has taken to ensure the safety and security of its residents; and while it will take some time getting used to, we trust that our neighbors will understand Masaryk’s decision.  Thanks. “  Unfortunately, this is all of the information we have. We do not know when the gates will close. Grand St. Settlement’s Executive Director has been promised multiple times that Masaryk leadership will provide clear communication and coordination regarding the gates, and we are very disappointed that this was not the case.

The petition asks Masaryk Towers to provide access to seniors and children and to fully communicate with the community about its plans.

We have a call into Masaryk Towers’ management office. We’ll let you know when the co-op responds. In late 2015, Masaryk Board President Bernice McCallum told us that, when the gates close, “the walkway will be available to the surrounding residents at designed times.” The board, she said, decided to close the gates because there have been, “a considerable amount of trips and falls.” This, she indicated, put the cooperative “at risk for not getting insurance or paying at a higher rate.” McCallum added, “we would like to continue to be good neighbors and assist wherever possible.”

 …

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-Event Passed-

from CityLimits.org:

April 29 @ 11:00 am5:00 pm

South Street Seaport Museum celebrates its 50th Anniversary

The South Street Seaport Museum, situated in the original port that built New York into the city it is today, will celebrate fifty years this year! The Seaport Museum invites the city to join in the celebration of this important milestone, which will be recognized over an entire year (April 2017-April 2018) of special programming and exhibitions. …

April 2017 marks fifty years since the Museum received its charter from the New York State Department of Education Board of Regents. Over that fifty years the Museum has grown dramatically, collecting artifacts and works of art documenting the rise of New York as a port city.; developing and implementing innovative and award-winning programming; mounting exhibitions; and preserving a fleet of historic ships on the East River. Despite three massive setbacks: the 9/11 attacks, the Great Recession of 2008, and the floodwaters of hurricane Sandy, the museum is growing once again. With support from New York City and a dedicated group of staff, volunteers, members and friends, the Seaport Museum remains an educational and cultural gem in lower Manhattan.

The Seaport Museum’s 50th anniversary will be marked throughout the year with the opening of new exhibitions, including Millions: Migrants and Millionaires aboard the Great Liners, 1900-1914 (opening June 2017), artistic and musical performances, lectures and book talks, walking tours, and a formal 50th anniversary cocktail reception aboard the 1885 ship Wavertree in September.

Capt. Jonathan Boulware, Executive Director of the Museum, spoke enthusiastically about the anniversary. “It’s a great privilege to celebrate the five-decade life of this vital institution. We’re here in the original fabric of old New York, the ships, the piers, the 19th-century buildings. It’s the history of New York, but the topics we cover are still highly relevant today. The original values that made New York what it is, the Dutch values of trade and tolerance, the New York values of immigration, of multiculturalism, and of ambition, these all touch on urgent issues of New York and America today. Indeed, as we celebrate this important anniversary, we’re also celebrating the very best of New York values, past, present, and future.”

A brief history of the Seaport Museum:
The Museum proper is housed several buildings known collectively as Schermerhorn Row, but when completed in 1812, Schermerhorn Row was, in many respects, the city’s first world trade center. The Row housed a series of counting houses where merchants bought and sold coffee, tea, cotton, molasses, and countless other trade goods from around the world. South Street was nicknamed ‘the Street of Ships’ for the countless sailing ships that docked there, linking the city with some of the most important centers of trade in Europe, the Caribbean, South America, California, and China. The commercial activity along South Street had by the mid-nineteenth century transformed New York from a former British colonial outpost, into the largest city in the United States that controlled half the country’s trade.

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The Women Who Made New York


Julie Scelfo

Author Event
Thursday April 06, 2017 7:00 PM
(History, Cultural Studies)
Event Description
Read any history of New York City and you will read about men. But that’s not the whole story. Julie Scelfo reveals the untold stories of the phenomenal women who made NYC the cultural epicenter of the world. Many were revolutionaries and activists; others were icons and iconoclasts. Some led quiet lives, but were influential. Scelfo reinvigorates not just New York’s history but its very identity.

Special Instructions
Seating is limited and available on a first-come, first-serve basis. Books can be purchased after signing. If you have questions or concerns, email crm19792@bn.com or ask a bookseller for more information. facebook.com/bnupperwestside

82nd & Broadway

2289 Broadway
New York, NY 10024
212-362-8835

Store Hours:

9-10 Every Day

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from The West Side Rag:

ENJOY A WEEKEND OF INTERDISCIPLINARY PROGRAMMING WITH THE BARD GRADUATE CENTER FOCUS FESTIVAL

SPONSORED

Focus Festival

Bard Graduate Center’s inaugural Focus Festival, April 8-9, 2017, brings thinkers and artists together for a weekend of interdisciplinary programming that draws inspiration from the key themes of our two spring Focus Project exhibitions: Design by the Book: Chinese Ritual Objects and the Sanli tu and  New York Crystal Palace 1853.

Claudia Rankine, 2016 MacArthur Fellow, poet, and essayist, will join Garnette Cadogan, essayist, in the keynote conversation “Ways of Seeing the City” on April 8 at 7 pm. Additional programs include a talk by Michael Puett, author of the New York Times bestseller The Path (April 9, 5 pm); walking tours of the Seneca Village site in Central Park with archaeologist Cynthia Copeland (April 8, 3 pm) and “Branding Fifth Avenue & the Other NY” with Jack Tchen, co-founder of the Museum of Chinese in America (April 9, 12 pm); and performances of Aaron Landsman’s critically acclaimed Love Story, a theatrical piece about a disappearing city, two people navigating it, and a fidgety, obsessive follower (April 8, 5:30 pm and April 9, 3:30 pm). Curators will offer spotlight tours of the exhibitions (April 8 and 9, 12 pm). Family-friendly workshops will be a special treat for kids (April 8 and 9, 1 pm).

For information, tickets, and the full schedule of events, click here.

Wendy’s Subway Reading Room
In conjunction Focus Project exhibitions, Brooklyn-based literary organization Wendy’s Subway has curated a Reading Room in the ground floor of the Gallery at 18 West 86 Street.

Wendy’s Subway Reading Room at Bard Graduate Center promotes engagement with artists’ books, periodicals, and other publications selected for their relationship to the spring exhibitions and public programming. A series of readings and writing workshops that gather together some of the boldest voices from poetry, literature, and performance will accompany the installation. Over the course of the installation, visitors are invited to drop off books they would like included in the Reading Room. Admission to the reading room is free, as is the wifi. It will be open during all public hours. Book suggestions may also be offered via a feedback box in the Gallery.

Wendy’s Subway launches the first of its monthly Reading Series on April 26 with an evening reading of works by Layli Longsoldier, Julian Talamantez Brolaski, and Wendy Xu. Read more.

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From the e-newsletter of the Committee To Save Mt. Manresa:

Don’t miss the latest report on our North Shore Watchlist…properties that have zoning issues, or historical sites at risk.     Don’t forget to sign our petition to Landmark St. Mary.  If you have a special connection to the church, please leave a comment about What St. Mary’s means to you. http://petitions.moveon.org/sign/landmark-st-mary-church?mailing_id=37146&source=s.icn.em.cr&r_by=237480
STATEN ISLAND REAL-TIME NEWS

Development concerns: 10 properties North Shore residents are keeping an eye on Updated March 12, 2017 
Lessons learned from Mount Manresa

Members of the Committee to Save Mount Manresa say they  learned a harsh lesson when Mount Manresa was sold to developers to build townhouses.

The organization has received feedback from other North Shore residents both at Community Board 1 meetings and at other forums, and has compiled a North Shore “watch list” for properties that could be ideal for developers.

“These are properties of concern — they have either historical significance or they are large properties that are not properly zoned,” said Barbara Sanchez of the Committee to Save Mount Manresa.

………..

Coast Guard in Rosebank

Located in Rosebank off Bay Street on 1 Anchor Place is the U.S. Coast Guard Station. While many think the Coast Guard will never move, some North Shore residents believe there’s no guarantee.

“City Planning says the Coast Guard isn’t planning to go anywhere….but that’s what everyone said about Mount Manresa….After Mount Manresa we are very sensitive to these large properties,” Sanchez said.

(Staten Island Advance/Jan Somma-Hammel)

St. Mary’s Church

St. Mary’s Church in Rosebank is one of the oldest churches on Staten Island. “It’s a large part of Rosebank history,” Sanchez, noting that St. Mary’s Church is zoned R4, which means that the property could be sold to developers for any type of housing.

Many North Shore residents would like to see the church landmarked, as it is an architectural focal point in Rosebank, with its prominent tower visible for miles around.

(Staten Island Advance/Jan Somma-Hammel)

Bayley Seton campus

The Salvation Army announced in March 2016 that its proposal for the Ray and Joan Kroc Corps Community Center, to be built on a portion of the old Bayley Seton Hospital that it purchased in 2009, was not financially viable.  Borough President James Oddo, who fought hard for the Kroc Center, has said his office plans to pursue constructing some other Salvation Army center on the property.

North Shore residents still express concern that the portion of the former hospital campus could be sold off to developers for large-scale housing.

(Staten Island Advance/Jan Somma-Hammel)

Former Sun Chemical

The former Sun Chemical site in Rosebank, which closed its doors in January 2008, may become the site of future back-to-back attached townhouses, according to the Office of the Borough President.

According to Sun Chemical, the property is “under a sale agreement” with 2846 Partners LLC. The property will first have to be rezoned from manufacturing to residential. While the property was remediated to clean up toxic materials that had seeped into the ground over the decades the plant was in operation, Oddo and others in the community question whether it is still hazardous for homeowners.…

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New York City Book and Ephemera Fair
Satellite Fair to NY Rare Book Week

Wallace Hall
at Church of St. Ignatius Loyola

980 Park Ave. (at 83rd), New York City
less than a miles from the NY Antiquarian Book Fair at the Park Ave Armory

ONE DAY ONLY!
Friday March 10th    8am-7pm (extended hours)
adult admission – $15
Youth admission (12-21) – $8

DEALER LIST

RSVP to receive a $5 or $10 discount coupon

Free Shuttle bus to the Park Ave. Armory
continuous service
first trip leaves Armory 7:45am
last shuttle leaves Wallace Hall 6:45pm

Look for this sign on the
shuttle bus

Sample gallery of a few of the items being offered

Sponsored by

Click map for directions

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Annual New York Antiquarian Book Fair

Friday Through Sunday, March 9th-March 12th.

Over 200 American and International Exhibitors.

Preview

Thur March 9  5-9pm

Open Hours

Fri March 10    noon-8pm

Sat March 11    noon-7pm

Sun March 12  noon-5pm

Discovery Day, Sunday, 1pm-3pm

Bring a treasure to be evaluated by our experts! Free with paid admission to the Fair.

Ticket Prices

Preview Pass

$50 (includes one daily re-admission)

Daily Admission $25

Students $10 (with valid ID)

Student tickets only available at the door

Run of Show: $40

Park Avenue Armory
643 Park Avenue, New York
Between 66/67 Streets

 The Armory’s 55,000 square foot drill hall, reminiscent of the original Grand Central Depot and the great train sheds of Europe, remains one of the largest unobstructed spaces of its kind in New York. A marvel of engineering in its time, it was designed by Regiment veteran and architect Charles W. Clinton, later a partner of Clinton & Russell, architects of the Apthorp Apartments and the famed, now demolished, Astor Hotel.

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100 Dealers of Rare & vintage books, ephemera, fine art prints, antique photography, manuscripts, posters, and “all things paper”.

Brooklyn Expo Center

Friday 5-9pm

Saturday 11am-7pm

Sunday 11am-5pm

79 Franklin st. Greenpoint, Bklyn

http://www.brooklynbookfair.com…

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