Category:

Jazz Age

Friday, February 2nd, 2018 1pm to 8pm

Saturday, February 3rd, 2018 11am-6pm

At The Metropolitan Pavilion, 125 W 18th street (between 6th & 7th Avenues)

$15/at the door

Buy tickets via the website: http://manhattanvintage.com/upcoming-shows/

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from Lost City:

04 September 2012

Lascoff Drugs Closes After a 113 Years

I thought upper Lexington Avenue had a special force field surrounding it (i.e.—influential rich people) that allowed an inordinate number of old businesses to survive. But, alas, I was wrong. If the bluebloods couldn’t save the iconic Upper East Side pharmacy Lascoff Drugs, what can they save?
Lascoff closed last July after 113 years in business. I don’t know how I missed that. I guess lately I’ve unconsciously learned to avert my eyes when beautiful landmarks shutter. I just can’t bear the pain.
Lascoff, along with Bigelow and one or two others, was one of New York’s great, classic pharmacies. It opened in 1899, when McKinley was President, and was the first licensed pharmacy in New York State, according to the New York Times. It was a store so majestic and solemn, you felt like you were entering a church when you went in. High ceilings, high shelving, a balcony, ancient Pharmacuetical relics, and silence. No music. You could find many old and classic brands there that you couldn’t locate elsewhere. And the vertical sign on the corner building was one of the grandest in the city.
The enterprise was founded by J. Leon Lascoff. He was born in Vilna, then in Russian Poland, and came to New York in 1892. His first drug store was at Lex and 83rd. He then moved across the street and then, in 1931, moved to 82nd and Lex—Lascoff’s final location. He died in 1936. His son Frederick took over the business and ran it until his death in 1970. During Fred’s time, the store had a reputation for odd cures. It sold leeches to boxers and catnip oil to lion hunters. He once sold a mixture of phenol, valerian, asafetida and iodoform to a colleague who had complained that his own pharmacy didn’t smell enough like a drug store.
After Frederick died, the business fell out of the family. It was purchased by Phil and Susan Ragusa. I assume they were still running it when it closed.

2 comments:

upstate johnny g said…

Aaarrrgggghhhhhh!!!!!!!! Another icon, another living link to the past, another glorious example of how time travel is almost possible, is closed. My girlfriend and I popped by Lascoff one morning this past summer and even though it was a weekday, they were closed. We didn’t quite get it, because we’d been there before and business seemed healthy enough. Brooks, we have you to thank for turning us on to Lascoff’s in the first place with your great posting about that neighborhood. We would go to Lascoff’s and then pop over to the Lexington Candy Shop to have a real burger and a Coke made with actual Coke syrup and carbonated water, mixed with a spoon by the fountain guy. Your Yorkville guide opened all of this up to us. Thanks.

Do you have any idea what will become of Lascoff’s?

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NY Adventure Club Presents: New Year’s Eve Speakeasy @ Civic Club Mansion

Don your flapper dress or three-piece tux and ring in the New Year inside a century-old mansion usually closed to the public, until now.

Join New York Adventure Club as we step back in time for an intimate, prohibition-era celebration inside a private mansion — originally built in 1899 for the Civic Club (which was dedicated to reducing poverty and gambling in the neighborhood), the house is now owned and operated by the New York Estonian Educational Society, which acts as the main center of Estonian culture on the U.S. Eastern seaboard

Once you relay the secret password at the entrance, you will enter into a highbrow affair and be treated to:

 

  • A host of interactive antique decor and props such as antique radios, Edison cylinders, stereoscopes (with prohibition-themed slides), and original prohibition prescriptions
  • Opportunities to purchase food and drinks from the house’s full restaurant and bar
  • Parlor games from the time period, including billiards and foosball
  • A champagne toast at midnight, which Volstead Act agents would have tried break up had they caught wind of it
  • Your ticket to this unique gathering includes entry into the private gilded age mansion, interactive opportunities with tons of authentic antiques from nearly a century ago, parlor games, and a glass of champagne to ring in the New Year.

     

    Flapper dress / black tie optional.

    See you there!

     


     

    Disclaimer

    Must be 21 or older.

    ID will be checked at door.

    By attending a New York Adventure Club experience, you accept our terms of service.

    Categories: Hidden Spots, Food, Historic Sites, Social

    58 tickets available

    $30

    Sunday, Dec 31
    9:30 PM – 1 AM

    New York

    Estonian House

    243 East 34th Street

    New York, NY 10016

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Live-In Theater has come up with another interactive, participatory theater experience that is a dramatization based on real past events, in this case, the 1915 apprehension of 45-year-old Mary Mallon, called “Typhoid Mary” by the news media of the time. Reportedly, Mallon infected 51 people with Typhoid Fever, three of them died.

Alas, the one future performance of The Trial Of Typhoid Mary (Dec. 10th) on the online calendar of the Live-In Theater website is presently sold out, and no performances are (so far) scheduled for 2018.  However, your hope of seeing it may not be entirely lost. A stage manager told me that they do this production in “a lot of high schools” as well as “for private groups”. It has been around for a few years, and they performed it at The New York Historical Society in 2016.

Live-In Theater’s promotional materials for the show, “The Trial of Typhoid Mary” say, “Come give Typhoid Mary the trial she never received”. Ticketholders assemble (in this case, in the downstairs room of a Lower East Side bar), and a costumed re-enactor in solemn black who declared himself the judge set the scene, and chose various members of the audience to act the parts of jurors, bailiffs, and, at the performance I attended, a courtroom sketch artist. Another costumed re-enactor handed out golf pencils and notepads, and doubled as a “barker”. Though from the Colonial era to the mid-19th century, it was not unheard of for courts to be informally convened in taverns, (at least in Staten Island) by the end of the 19th century to the early 20th century (the time of Mary Mallon’s arrest for being a public health hazard), court proceedings had acquired a lot more formality and government control, not to mention proper courthouses. However, treatment of suspects under the premises of “innocent until proven guilty” had not advanced as much as it has now. I think the majority of the twenty- and thirty- something audience were properly horrified that Mallon had been arrested without a warrant, and some who questioned the actress who played Mallon on the stand clearly disapproved of the fact that she had not been read her rights (enforcement of this became a 1960s innovation), and had previously been summarily imprisoned on North Brother Island. Motivated perhaps by the role-playing of certain of the re-enactors, the suffragette who claimed to have been Mallon’s previous employer, who stressed that Mallon did not willfully infect others, and the one who played Mallon, who claimed to have nursed the family who got typhoid back to health, doing the more onerous duties, including washing soiled bedsheets, unlike in real life, they returned a verdict of innocent, though Mallon’s understanding of sanitary practices was to clean away all visible dirt, and she didn’t seem too concerned about whether she washed her hands “after she had been to the privy” if they were “not dirty”. All participants in this exercise had entered a time when “The Germ Theory of Disease” was as hotly debated and widely doubted as the phenomena of Global Warming is now, and with pretty much the same class divide between adherents.…

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From Curbed:

New York Transit Museum’s vintage subway trains return for the holidays

You won’t want to miss this

As the holiday season approaches, the New York Transit Museum is once again collaborating with the MTA to offer subway rides on its vintage fleet of subway cars.

And this year, in honor of the one-year anniversary of the Second Avenue Subway opening, this year’s holiday trains will run along the F line between Second Avenue and Lexington Avenue/63rd Street and the Q line between Lexington Avenue / 63rd Street and 96th Street.

Beginning Sunday, November 26, riders can “ride back in time” on a special eight-car subway train from the 1930s that is decked out with ceiling fans, rattan seats, vintage roll signs, incandescent light bulbs, and original subway ads of the time period.

Holiday train rides will be around for just five Sundays, running on November 26, December 3, 10, 17, and 24. On the F line, trains depart at 10 a.m., 12 p.m., 2 p.m., and 4 p.m. while from the 96th Street subway station, trains will depart at 11 a.m., 1 p.m., 3 p.m., and 5 p.m. The best part is that it will only cost you the swipe of your MetroCard.

From The MTA:

Holiday Vintage Buses Take You Down Memory Lane

Take a bus ride down memory lane, or time travel to the past for the first time, this holiday season!

MTA New York City Transit will offer rides on its vintage bus fleet on the M42 route beginning Monday, December 4, to Friday, December 22. A variety of vintage buses will operate along the crosstown route between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. on weekdays, weather permitting.

The annual tradition of running vintage, historic buses continues, as coaches make stops from river to river along 42 Street in Manhattan. Whether you’ve been riding the buses since before they were historic, or this is your first time experiencing the holidays in the city, these vintage buses are fun for everyone.

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120th Egg Nog Party, December 14
We thought it was just cream, eggs, sugar, and rum, but, hey, what do we know. Chemists, apparently, know the secret to the lip-smacking-est eggnog, and they’re letting us nonscientists have a taste at their annual holiday party. The Chemists’ Club has been hosting this ode to the ’nog for more than a century now, so its secret recipe must be one for the record books (or at least a cookbook). New York Academy of Science, 250 Greenwich Street (between Vesey and Barclay Streets), Tribeca

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From Atlas Obscura:

The Twilight of the Analog Photo Booth

The effort to save a rare beast on the road to extinction.

On a recent Saturday morning in New York, the analog photo booth in the Ace Hotel on 29th Street was out of order. Inside the booth, which costs $5 plus tax for a strip of four black-and-white photographs (cards accepted), a piece of paper hung askew atop the mirror, level with the sign reading “EYE LEVEL.” “Sorry, I’m broken …” it read. “I’ll be better soon. XO, Ace.” Barely a dozen of these film-based photo booths remain in the city, a fact that would have been inconceivable as recently as the 1990s.

In September 1925, the crowds stretched around the block for the first ever Photomaton studio, 30 blocks north of the present site of the Ace Hotel, at 51st Street and Broadway. Each subject paid 25 cents, was bathed in flashes of light, and waited eight minutes for a strip of eight photographs. Eighteen months later, the New York Times reported, “Young Photomaton Inventor Will Celebrate His First Million.” In today’s money, this would be close to $14 million.

Anatol Josepho, the inventor of the "Photomaton" photo booth that debuted in September 1925 at 1659 Broadway in New York City.
Anatol Josepho, the inventor of the “Photomaton” photo booth that debuted in September 1925 at 1659 Broadway in New York City. Library of Congress/LC-DIG-ggbain-25079

The inventor, Anatol Josepho, was born in 1894, and came from nothing. Josepho, né Josephowitz, grew up a banished Jew in Siberia. At 15, he went off to explore the world, starting in Berlin, where he bought a Brownie camera and learned to take photographs. Later, he took it to Budapest, to Shanghai, and eventually to New York. In Harlem, in 1925, he raised the $11,000 required to build a prototype for the first curtain-enclosed photo booth—the cost of nearly six reasonably sized houses at that time. Josepho was charming, and obsessed with the project, writes photographer Näkki Goranin. Despite being a newcomer to the city, “[he] was able to talk people into loaning him the money, find the appropriate machinists and engineers to help him build his Photomaton machine, and be sought out by the leading industrialists in America.”

Josepho stood on the shoulders of decades of tinkerers who had been flirting with this technology since the 1880s, when a craze for vending machines of all kinds, including seltzer, chocolate, and postcards, seized Europe and America. Concurrently, photographic technology was developing at a galloping pace. Some early booths offered prints for a penny, others unreliable tintypes with near-unrecognizable subjects. Throughout the 1920s, the technology was becoming more and more refined—until, in 1925, Josepho patented the booth that set the standard for the next 90 years.

Two friends pose for a picture in a photo booth, date unknown.
Two friends pose for a picture in a photo booth, date unknown. simpleinsomnia/CC BY 2.0

Before long the photo booth was everywhere: malls, bars, airports, post offices, Fred Astaire films. In the United States, they were often owned by the company PhotoMe, says Tim Garrett, an artist who co-runs the site Photobooth.Net with friend and colleague Brian Meacham.

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Come in, come in! Enter into the spectral shadows of St. John’s Sanctuary which has sat quietly for 190 years in the heart of historical Greenwich Village. But, now…lit by flickering candlelight, bathed in ghostly mist, the players at the award-winning, critically-acclaimed Radiotheatre hope to chill the marrow in your bones as they celebrate the High Holy Days of HALLOWEEN with its 9th Annual H.P. LOVECRAFT FESTIVAL…teeming with very special denizens of its own, 
so rich in bloodcurdling variety that the heart thuds loudly, sweat breaks and the cringing mind searches shudderingly 
for the next ghastly manifestation in this terrifying feast of fiendish delights! All live, onstage complete with our fabulous cast, original orchestral scores and a plethora of sound FX 
in our ongoing tribute to the Grandmaster of 20th Century American Horror himself, H.P. LOVECRAFT(1890-1937.) 
St. John’s Sanctuary    81 Christopher St.  NYC  
Off 7th Ave.  #1 train Sheridan Sq.  All W4th St Trains
THE STORIES

HERBERT WEST, REANIMATOR – A Lovecraft classic!  A mad doctor’s assistant recalls their efforts to resurrect the dead!

THE SHADOW OVER INNSMOUTH – A young man visits the seedy New England seaport of Innsmouth where he finds a strange breed of inhabitants. 

THE HORROR AT RED HOOK – A NYC cop uncovers a terrible cult alive in Brooklyn, but no one believes him!

THE EVIL CLERGYMAN – A man finds himself in an eerie attic with a Satanic past.

THE THING ON THE DOORSTEP – A man marries a weird woman whom he claims has possessed him body and soul!

HYPNOS – A female sculptor spends years with her mate sharing drug induced dreams where they travel to a place called Hypnos.

DAGON – A shipwrecked man discovers an island of strange beings who worship ancient gods.  After he is rescued, they pursue him. 

THE TRANSITION OF JUAN ROMERO – A gold mine explodes leaving a fathomless abyss into which a miner and his Mexican friend enter! 

THE STATEMENT OF RANDOLPH CARTER – Two scientists explore the frightening world beneath an old cemetery!


CALENDAR OF SHOWS   ALL SHOWS @  8 PM

10/19-  REANIMATOR; EVIL CLERGYMAN

10/20 – THING ON DOORSTEP; HORROR AT RED HOOK

10/21 – SHADOW OVER INNSMOUTH; HYPNOS

10/25 – DAGON; STATEMENT; HYPNOS; EVIL CLERGYMAN

10/28 – REANIMATOR; EVIL CLERGYMAN

10/29 – INSMOUTH; HORROR AT RED HOOK

10/30 – REANIMATOR; TRANSITION

11/1 –   INNSMOUTH; HYPNOS

11/3 –   THING ON DOORSTEP; HORROR AT RED HOOK

11/4 –   REANIMATOR; EVIL CLERGYMAN 

11/5 –   DAGON; STATEMENT; EVIL CLERGYMAN; HYPNOS
SMARTTIX.COM  212 – 868-4444
WRITTEN/DIRECTED/MUSIC 
BY DAN BIANCHI
SOUND DESIGN- DAN BIANCHI/ WES SHIPPEE
CAST: FRANK ZILINYI; R.PATRICK ALBERTY; 
ALEJANDRO CARDOZO; CAITLIN BOYLE
“THE GREATEST PRACTIONER OF HORROR IN THE 20th CENTURY!”   STEPHEN KING

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