Category:

New Amsterdam

New York Now Scavenger Hunt
Saturday, June 17, 2017
Check-in: 10:00 AM – 12:00 PM
Hunt: 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Closing Reception: 5:30 – 7:30 PM

Open House New York challenges you to show how much you know about New York’s recent past!

A lot has changed in New York City since the first Open House New York Weekend took place on October 11 and 12, 2003. From the High Line and Hudson Yards to Citibike and the Second Avenue Subway, the city and our experience of it has changed dramatically over the past fifteen years. 40,000 new buildings were built, 450 miles of new bike lanes were laid, and more than a third of New York’s neighborhoods were rezoned.

Through it all, Open House New York was there, opening doors and giving New Yorkers access to the changing city. Now Open House New York invites you to test your knowledge about this vibrant and volatile period in New York’s history! To celebrate the 15th anniversary of OHNY Weekend, Open House New York has organized a citywide scavenger hunt of recent architecture, planning, and development. Travel the five boroughs while answering clues that send you to New York’s most breathtaking new buildings. Relive some of the city’s most heated preservation battles and uncover the policies and politics that shaped contemporary New York. Join us in celebrating a city that remains the greatest metropolis in the world!

To learn more about how the hunt works, click here.

Closing Reception Hosted by

Registration
$35 per person. Advance registration is required, and early registration is encouraged as the number of participating teams is limited.

REGISTER TODAY

 

 

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from the Lo-Down:

Masaryk Towers Closes Rivington Street Gates

masaryk gate closed

There have been some tense moments outside the Masaryk Towers apartment complex this afternoon. The cooperative today carried out a long-expected and controversial plan — closing gates on a de-mapped section of Rivington Street, between Columbia and Pitt streets. The closure cuts off a main passageway used by the neighborhood-at-large to travel throughout the community.

We’re told by people in the area, including District Leader Paul Newell, that the decision is already prompting a big reaction. Newell says the feedback from Masaryk residents is mixed, while sentiment from the larger community is resoundingly negative.

Months ago, Grand Street Settlement expressed serious concerns about the closure. The entrance of the non-profit organization’s senior center is located just beyond the gates, near Pitt Street. Executive Director Robert Cordero was promised by the co-op’s leadership that the community would be advised of the changes well in advance of the closure. There was almost no warning before the gates were shut today. Here’s part of a petition Grand Street Settlement is circulating:

This closure places undo burden on the 4,000+ children, youth, families, and seniors who visit our center (including those who reside in Masaryk Towers). We are especially worried about our seniors who live in Baruch Houses on the East River and have limited mobility. On May 4th, Grand St. Settlement received the following notice that the gates will be closed from Bernice McCallum, Chair of Masaryk Board of Directors: “This is an update regarding the closing of the gates.  The Board of Masaryk Towers decided to close the gates.  The gate closure is one of the many measures Masaryk has taken to ensure the safety and security of its residents; and while it will take some time getting used to, we trust that our neighbors will understand Masaryk’s decision.  Thanks. “  Unfortunately, this is all of the information we have. We do not know when the gates will close. Grand St. Settlement’s Executive Director has been promised multiple times that Masaryk leadership will provide clear communication and coordination regarding the gates, and we are very disappointed that this was not the case.

The petition asks Masaryk Towers to provide access to seniors and children and to fully communicate with the community about its plans.

We have a call into Masaryk Towers’ management office. We’ll let you know when the co-op responds. In late 2015, Masaryk Board President Bernice McCallum told us that, when the gates close, “the walkway will be available to the surrounding residents at designed times.” The board, she said, decided to close the gates because there have been, “a considerable amount of trips and falls.” This, she indicated, put the cooperative “at risk for not getting insurance or paying at a higher rate.” McCallum added, “we would like to continue to be good neighbors and assist wherever possible.”

 …

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-Event Passed-

from CityLimits.org:

April 29 @ 11:00 am5:00 pm

South Street Seaport Museum celebrates its 50th Anniversary

The South Street Seaport Museum, situated in the original port that built New York into the city it is today, will celebrate fifty years this year! The Seaport Museum invites the city to join in the celebration of this important milestone, which will be recognized over an entire year (April 2017-April 2018) of special programming and exhibitions. …

April 2017 marks fifty years since the Museum received its charter from the New York State Department of Education Board of Regents. Over that fifty years the Museum has grown dramatically, collecting artifacts and works of art documenting the rise of New York as a port city.; developing and implementing innovative and award-winning programming; mounting exhibitions; and preserving a fleet of historic ships on the East River. Despite three massive setbacks: the 9/11 attacks, the Great Recession of 2008, and the floodwaters of hurricane Sandy, the museum is growing once again. With support from New York City and a dedicated group of staff, volunteers, members and friends, the Seaport Museum remains an educational and cultural gem in lower Manhattan.

The Seaport Museum’s 50th anniversary will be marked throughout the year with the opening of new exhibitions, including Millions: Migrants and Millionaires aboard the Great Liners, 1900-1914 (opening June 2017), artistic and musical performances, lectures and book talks, walking tours, and a formal 50th anniversary cocktail reception aboard the 1885 ship Wavertree in September.

Capt. Jonathan Boulware, Executive Director of the Museum, spoke enthusiastically about the anniversary. “It’s a great privilege to celebrate the five-decade life of this vital institution. We’re here in the original fabric of old New York, the ships, the piers, the 19th-century buildings. It’s the history of New York, but the topics we cover are still highly relevant today. The original values that made New York what it is, the Dutch values of trade and tolerance, the New York values of immigration, of multiculturalism, and of ambition, these all touch on urgent issues of New York and America today. Indeed, as we celebrate this important anniversary, we’re also celebrating the very best of New York values, past, present, and future.”

A brief history of the Seaport Museum:
The Museum proper is housed several buildings known collectively as Schermerhorn Row, but when completed in 1812, Schermerhorn Row was, in many respects, the city’s first world trade center. The Row housed a series of counting houses where merchants bought and sold coffee, tea, cotton, molasses, and countless other trade goods from around the world. South Street was nicknamed ‘the Street of Ships’ for the countless sailing ships that docked there, linking the city with some of the most important centers of trade in Europe, the Caribbean, South America, California, and China. The commercial activity along South Street had by the mid-nineteenth century transformed New York from a former British colonial outpost, into the largest city in the United States that controlled half the country’s trade.

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The Women Who Made New York


Julie Scelfo

Author Event
Thursday April 06, 2017 7:00 PM
(History, Cultural Studies)
Event Description
Read any history of New York City and you will read about men. But that’s not the whole story. Julie Scelfo reveals the untold stories of the phenomenal women who made NYC the cultural epicenter of the world. Many were revolutionaries and activists; others were icons and iconoclasts. Some led quiet lives, but were influential. Scelfo reinvigorates not just New York’s history but its very identity.

Special Instructions
Seating is limited and available on a first-come, first-serve basis. Books can be purchased after signing. If you have questions or concerns, email crm19792@bn.com or ask a bookseller for more information. facebook.com/bnupperwestside

82nd & Broadway

2289 Broadway
New York, NY 10024
212-362-8835

Store Hours:

9-10 Every Day

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from a facebook posting by Virginia N. Sherry:

“Got word today that my proposed multimedia project — “Walk Back into History: 4 Centuries of Staten Island’s Architectural Treasures” — received one of the 2017 Premier Grants from Staten Island Arts. (These grants are funded by the NYC Department of Cultural Affairs.)

Thrilled– will begin the work next month!

Wow! Thanks for the feedback!”

Image may contain: tree, plant, sky, outdoor and nature

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As one of the oldest buildings in the five boroughs of New York, 392 West Street has a long and storied past history. Having been among the few wood-frame buildings to have survived the increasing urbanization of Manhattan, the current owner, an individual many would consider a “wealthy eccentric” seeks to transfer the ownership/use of it to a Native American to be used as a “prayer house” under the direction of the Lenape tribe, former original inhabitants/owners of New York.

From The New York Times:
Giving Back a ‘Stolen’ Property to the Original Manhattanites
by COREY KILGANNON

Photo
Jean-Louis Goldwater Bourgeois, right, a wealthy activist, wants to turn a house in the West Village into a prayer center. His choice to run it is Anthony Jay Van Dunk, left, a former chief of the Ramapough Lenape Nation. Credit Sam Hodgson for The New York Times

The squat clapboard house overlooking the Hudson River in the West Village might not seem like an obvious place for a Native American prayer center.

Its graffiti-strewn facade faces the busy West Side Highway, with a city bus stop out front. It once housed a series of bars, and the back of the building faces tiny Weehawken Street, which has traditionally been a popular gathering spot for gay and transgender people.

The house’s ground floor now sits directly on Manhattan soil, said Jean-Louis Goldwater Bourgeois, 76, a wealthy activist who bought the property in 2006. He says he is essentially donating it back to its original owners: the Lenape Indians.

Mr. Bourgeois wants the building to be a prayer house, to be owned and operated by the Lenape nation, which inhabited Manhattan before it was appropriated by European settlers.

Mr. Bourgeois pointed to a hole recently jackhammered through the thick concrete flooring of the house, which left black soil exposed underneath.

“You can actually touch Manhattan soil — the idea is to be in touch with Mother Earth,” he said, adding that the plan was to remove the concrete and simply have a dirt floor.

Anthony Jay Van Dunk, a former chief of the Ramapough Lenape Nation, a tribe based in Mahwah, N.J., is Mr. Bourgeois’s choice to start a prayer house, or a Pahtamawiikan, as it is known in one of the languages spoken by the Lenape.

Photo

Mr. Bourgeois said he bought the squat clapboard house, at 392 West Street, in 2006 for $2.2 million. It is covered in graffiti and overlooks the Hudson River. Credit Sam Hodgson for The New York Times

Mr. Bourgeois said he had always been troubled by the well-known and not quite accurate legend that, four centuries ago, the Lenape sold Manhattan to Dutch settlers for the equivalent of $24 worth of goods.

“It’s quite offensive,” he said. “It’s a form of conquest.”

Mr. Van Dunk, 54, a Brooklyn woodworker who is active in Native American issues, pointed out that, if such a transaction had taken place, the Lenape might have meant it as a good-will exchange for sharing the land, and not as transferring ownership, especially because the tribe did not believe anyone could own land or water.

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from NYPL:

The Landmarks of New York: An Illustrated, Comprehensive Record of New York City’s Historic Buildings, with Barbaralee Diamonstein-Spielvogel, chairwoman of New York State Council on the Arts and author of 23 books.

Tuesday, December 6, 2016, 6:30 p.m.

Program Locations:

Fully accessible to wheelchairs
First come, first served

This illustrated lecture showcases New York City’s architectural history and richness, surveying a broad range of styles and building types: colonial farmhouses, Gilded Age mansions, churches, schools, libraries, museums, and the great twentieth-century skyscrapers that are recognized throughout the world.

Events at The New York Public Library may be photographed or recorded. By attending these events, you consent to the use of your image and voice by the Library for all purposes.

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6:30pm

In conjunction with the Culinary Historians of New York

From the earliest days of American history, food has played an important political function, especially in election years. Food can draw people together and create a sense of national identity, as it did in the years following the American Revolution. Food can also reflect deep political divisions, as the torrid battles between political parties in the 1800s demonstrate. Moreover, the symbolically significant nature of food allowed for the political participation of people otherwise excluded from public culture–namely, women.  Just days before the presidential election, Montana State University Assistant Professor of History, Emily J. Arendt, will explore how food, from Federal Cakes to Jackson Jumbles, contributed to Early American political and women’s history. Includes a sampling of food from the era. Reservations required by calling the Museum at 212-838-6878.

$40 Adults, $25 Members, $22 Senior Members, $10 Students with ID

 

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October 19, 2016

City of Dreams: The 400-Year Epic History of Immigrant New York

event

With more than three million foreign-born residents today, this city has been America’s defining port of entry for nearly four centuries. These migrants have brought hundreds of languages and distinct cultures to the city, and from there to the entire country. Tyler Anbinder, author of The Five Points, discusses his new book, City of Dreams, which puts the immigrant experience at the center of the growth and development of New York City. Pulitzer Prize nominated author Suketu Mehta joins Anbinder in conversation.

Seating is first-come, first-served. Doors will open at 6 p.m. Books will be for sale with a 15% discount. If you have any questions, contact Laura Lee at llee@tenement.org or (646) 518-3032.

October 19, 2016
6:30-8:00 PM
Tenement Museum
103 Orchard Street, New York NY 10002
FREE

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