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New Amsterdam

At Museum of the City of New York

1220 Fifth Ave at 103rd St., Open Daily 10am–6pm

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From frozen ponds to Madison Square Garden, ice-skating has become a quintessentially New York pastime, woven into the city’s urban fabric in ways large and small.

New York on Ice: Skating in the City invites visitors to explore how ice-skating evolved in the city from its colonial Dutch and British origins to become a 19th-century craze, and later an opportunity for elaborate spectacle, commercialized leisure, and competitive sport in the 20th century and beyond. Along the way, skating has left its mark on New York’s urban landscape, from the design of Central Park, to intimate hotel rinks and extravagant arenas, to a plethora of skating facilities that today define and transform parks and other public spaces across the city.

The story of New York on Ice will be told through vintage photographs, posters, lithographs, paintings, and costumes. Together they reveal the evolution of the sport and art of ice-skating in the city both as a window into a passion and pastime of generations of New Yorkers, and as an unexpected ingredient of urban place-making.

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From Thought Gallery NYC:
After the city’s Halloween festivities come to an end, New Yorkers will still be able to get a look at the city’s haunted histories at New York: City of the Dead on November 9, which offers an overview of the city’s cemeteries – including the secret ones hidden in some unlikely places.…

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Lower Manhattan is where the Dutch settled, George Washington was inaugurated, and Alexander Hamilton has his final resting place. Learn about the history of the area on a Lower Manhattan History Walk on October 21…  To learn about the area’s seedier underbelly, catch the history of crime in NYC on October 21. A separate walking tour on October 28 will put Wall Street and great financial crashes at the forefront.…

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A few blocks uptown, head to the Lower East Side on October 22 for a look at the Jewish gangsters who once trafficked in the area, including Arnold Rothstein, Meir Lansky and Bugsy Siegel. To the west, New Yorkers can discover the West Village on a walking tour exploring the area’s history, ecology, and architecture on October 17.…

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April 2017 marks fifty years since the
Museum received its charter from the New
York State Department of Education Board of
Regents. Over that fifty years the Museum has
grown dramatically, collecting artifacts and
works of art documenting the rise of New York
as a port city.; developing and implementing
innovative and award-winning programming;
mounting exhibitions; and preserving a fleet of
historic ships on the East River. Despite three
massive setbacks: the 9/11 attacks, the Great
Recession of 2008, and the floodwaters of hurri-
cane Sandy, the museum is growing once again.
With support from New York City and a dedi-
cated group of staff, volunteers, members and
friends, the Seaport Museum remains an edu-
cational and cultural gem in lower Manhattan.
The Seaport Museum’s 50th anniversary will
be marked throughout the year with the open-
ing of new exhibitions, including Millions:
Migrants and Millionaires aboard the Great
Liners, 1900-1914 (opening June 2017), artistic
and musical performances, lectures and book
talks, walking tours, and a formal 50th anni-
versary cocktail reception aboard the 1885 ship
Wavertree in September. #

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The Cemetery will be open on Sunday, August 6th from noon to 6:00 pm.
Come and enjoy a lovely and rare afternoon inside the gates!

Welcome to the web site of The New York City Marble Cemetery.

You have most likely come here as part of genealogical research on your family and we are happy for you to visit. This site may well be of some help to you; we certainly hope so.

We also hope that you will be able to be of help to The New York City Marble Cemetery. The Board of Trustees is eager to update our files. If you are able to show a direct line of descent from any of the vault holders, you are entitled to participate in the management of the cemetery and, most particularly, the use of your family vault. Our annual meeting, open only to vault owners, is on the first Monday in May. Please contact the office for more details.

Whether you are interested in becoming more involved in the Cemetery or not, we would be very interested in any information you can offer about family members interred in the Cemetery and, if you desire, would be happy to post this information on our site.

The New York City Marble Cemetery is a small jewel of beauty and peace. Although we have a small endowment, it is not enough to maintain the cemetery as it could be or even should be. While the cemetery is generally closed to the public, entrance may be arranged by special appointment; a donation is requested for this service.

While there is no formal connection between the two cemeteries, you may also wish to visit the web site of the neighboring (and similarly named) New York Marble Cemetery.…

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Vanishing New York, the book, was officially released this past Tuesday, after having been available for pre-order. However, assorted independent book shops in the New York area are scheduling book-launch events at their individual locations.

From Vanishing New York, the blog:

You can also get a copy at the launch party this Thursday night at Housing Works Bookstore Cafe, or next Thursday night at the Brooklyn launch party at powerHouse Arena. For a full list of book events, click here.

In the meantime, check out two exclusive excerpts: the East Village chapter at Longreads and the tourism chapter at Vice.

 …

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New York Now Scavenger Hunt
Saturday, June 17, 2017
Check-in: 10:00 AM – 12:00 PM
Hunt: 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Closing Reception: 5:30 – 7:30 PM

Open House New York challenges you to show how much you know about New York’s recent past!

A lot has changed in New York City since the first Open House New York Weekend took place on October 11 and 12, 2003. From the High Line and Hudson Yards to Citibike and the Second Avenue Subway, the city and our experience of it has changed dramatically over the past fifteen years. 40,000 new buildings were built, 450 miles of new bike lanes were laid, and more than a third of New York’s neighborhoods were rezoned.

Through it all, Open House New York was there, opening doors and giving New Yorkers access to the changing city. Now Open House New York invites you to test your knowledge about this vibrant and volatile period in New York’s history! To celebrate the 15th anniversary of OHNY Weekend, Open House New York has organized a citywide scavenger hunt of recent architecture, planning, and development. Travel the five boroughs while answering clues that send you to New York’s most breathtaking new buildings. Relive some of the city’s most heated preservation battles and uncover the policies and politics that shaped contemporary New York. Join us in celebrating a city that remains the greatest metropolis in the world!

To learn more about how the hunt works, click here.

Closing Reception Hosted by

Registration
$35 per person. Advance registration is required, and early registration is encouraged as the number of participating teams is limited.

REGISTER TODAY

 

 

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from the Lo-Down:

Masaryk Towers Closes Rivington Street Gates

masaryk gate closed

There have been some tense moments outside the Masaryk Towers apartment complex this afternoon. The cooperative today carried out a long-expected and controversial plan — closing gates on a de-mapped section of Rivington Street, between Columbia and Pitt streets. The closure cuts off a main passageway used by the neighborhood-at-large to travel throughout the community.

We’re told by people in the area, including District Leader Paul Newell, that the decision is already prompting a big reaction. Newell says the feedback from Masaryk residents is mixed, while sentiment from the larger community is resoundingly negative.

Months ago, Grand Street Settlement expressed serious concerns about the closure. The entrance of the non-profit organization’s senior center is located just beyond the gates, near Pitt Street. Executive Director Robert Cordero was promised by the co-op’s leadership that the community would be advised of the changes well in advance of the closure. There was almost no warning before the gates were shut today. Here’s part of a petition Grand Street Settlement is circulating:

This closure places undo burden on the 4,000+ children, youth, families, and seniors who visit our center (including those who reside in Masaryk Towers). We are especially worried about our seniors who live in Baruch Houses on the East River and have limited mobility. On May 4th, Grand St. Settlement received the following notice that the gates will be closed from Bernice McCallum, Chair of Masaryk Board of Directors: “This is an update regarding the closing of the gates.  The Board of Masaryk Towers decided to close the gates.  The gate closure is one of the many measures Masaryk has taken to ensure the safety and security of its residents; and while it will take some time getting used to, we trust that our neighbors will understand Masaryk’s decision.  Thanks. “  Unfortunately, this is all of the information we have. We do not know when the gates will close. Grand St. Settlement’s Executive Director has been promised multiple times that Masaryk leadership will provide clear communication and coordination regarding the gates, and we are very disappointed that this was not the case.

The petition asks Masaryk Towers to provide access to seniors and children and to fully communicate with the community about its plans.

We have a call into Masaryk Towers’ management office. We’ll let you know when the co-op responds. In late 2015, Masaryk Board President Bernice McCallum told us that, when the gates close, “the walkway will be available to the surrounding residents at designed times.” The board, she said, decided to close the gates because there have been, “a considerable amount of trips and falls.” This, she indicated, put the cooperative “at risk for not getting insurance or paying at a higher rate.” McCallum added, “we would like to continue to be good neighbors and assist wherever possible.”

 …

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