Category:

Revolutionary War

From the Fraunces Tavern Museum website:

Washington’s Farewell

  • Google Calendar ICS
  • To commemorate Washington’s emotional farewell to his Officers that took place in the Long Room on December 4, 1783, a special reenactment of the farewell will occur throughout the day in the famous Long Room.

    This year we are thrilled to announce that actor Ian Kahn, who portrayed George Washington on the hit AMC series TURN,will be at the Museum to reprise his role and reenact the toast given by George Washington in Fraunces Tavern’s historic Long Room on December 4, 1783. Joining Ian to reenact the toast will be Dan Shippey, a George Washington reenactor and expert from the Breed’s Hill Institute who served as Ian’s mentor and inspiration during his time working on the show. Come and witness the toast, interact with “George,” and talk with Ian about his life-changing experience playing the General on TV.

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    Visitors will enjoy $1 admission for this exciting day of events; which will also include additional tours and activities throughout the day; such as a colonial costume photobooth, and hands-on family activities.

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From Thought Gallery NYC:
After the city’s Halloween festivities come to an end, New Yorkers will still be able to get a look at the city’s haunted histories at New York: City of the Dead on November 9, which offers an overview of the city’s cemeteries – including the secret ones hidden in some unlikely places.…

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Lower Manhattan is where the Dutch settled, George Washington was inaugurated, and Alexander Hamilton has his final resting place. Learn about the history of the area on a Lower Manhattan History Walk on October 21…  To learn about the area’s seedier underbelly, catch the history of crime in NYC on October 21. A separate walking tour on October 28 will put Wall Street and great financial crashes at the forefront.…

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Brooklyn also has plenty of secrets in store for New Yorkers to discover this fall. Join Untapped Cities for Secret Brooklyn: An Unusual Guide on October 23, which will give attendees the chance to learn from one of the borough’s secret locations, along Newtown Creek. To learn more about one of the borough’s icons, the Brooklyn Dodgers, head to a talk on the legendary baseball team’s legacy on October 17.

Learn about the “Ghost Ship” of Brooklyn, which was stationed off the borough’s coast during the American Revolution, on November 20.…

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Sat, October 14th, 2017 |

11:00 am to 4:00 pm

Free with Museum Admission
Recommended for all ages

On October 14, 1781, Lieutenant Colonel Alexander Hamilton made his famous charge to capture Redoubt Ten in the Battle of Yorktown. Come to the Museum ready with your questions for Hamilton! Portrayed by a Living Historian, Lt. Col. Hamilton tells you how he helped win the climactic campaign of the Revolutionary War. Don’t miss your chance to learn a military drill from the War for Independence under the instruction of Hamilton himself!

We’re celebrating Hamilton’s military career with Living History all weekend. Join us on Sunday to meet the New York City militia that Hamilton joined while he was still in school!


Living History Days at N-YHS
Living History: Hamilton’s Militia, Now Recruiting!
Sunday, October 15th, 2017 | 11:00 am – 4:00 pm

Free with Museum Admission
Recommended for all ages

Immerse yourself in the independent militia company that started Hamilton’s military career! Meet the Hearts of Oak, a troop of Living Historians who portray the group of young volunteers that came together in colonial New-York on the eve of the American Revolution in 1775. Some members of the militia, like Hamilton, were students at King’s College—known today as Columbia University! Take a close look at their distinctive green coats, listen to fife and drum music, and experience a military drill.

We’re celebrating Hamilton’s military career with Living History all weekend. On Saturdaymeet Lieutenant Colonel Alexander Hamilton and learn about his victory at the Battle of Yorktown that happened on this weekend in 1781!

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Wednesday, July 8, 2015

MANHATTAN – 35 Cooper Square

Gone. 35 Cooper Square.  Was one of the oldest Federal-style houses on the Bowery.

In its day, the house, now known as 35 Cooper Square, was nestled among three similar dormer-roof structures. Today it resembles a pink mushroom, propped up against the towering glass and steel sequoia that is the Cooper Square Hotel.

The New York Times

Link – #35 Cooper Square

I didn’t get lazy.  I just discovered that someone had a better blog entry than the one I was working on.  🙂  In Mr. Moss’ blog, a man is said to have hanged himself in the attic, however I can find only anecdotal information about this “man.”  Could he be the unknown man who died at this address in 1903 with $0.42 to his name?

#35 (AKA #391 Bowery) is no longer standing, but the energy may well be there.

35 Cooper Square is now a 13-story dormitory building.

Known Residents
1815 — Samuel WIGTON
Longworth’s American Almanack, New-York Register, and City Directory, 1815.

1825-1827 — Built by Nicholas William STUYVESANT, great-grandson of Peter Stuyvesant. 

c. 1825 — John and Mary WOOD. 
www.nytimes.com/2011/02/19/nyregion/19metjournal.html?ref=nyregion&_r=0 

1837 — William D. DISBROW, sexton of St. Mark’s Church in the Bowery, 1825-1848.  Undertaker.  Offered horses and coaches to let.  Lived at #386, worked at #391 Bowery.
Longworth’s American Almanac, New-York Register, and City Directory, 1837, p. 206.
Documents of the Board of Aldermen of the City of New York, Volume IV, 1838, p. 478.
Memorial of St. Mark’s Church in the Bowery, Vestry, 1899. 

1839-1847 — James M. SWEENY, prominent teacher in the New York Public School system, professor of Latin and Greek languages; born 1796 in Ireland, died June 23, 1879 at his residence #264 Jay Street, Brooklyn.  At the time of his death, he was the principal of Primary School No. 24 on Elm Street.
Longworth’s American Almanac, New-York Register, and City Directory, 1839, p. 632 
Doggett’s New-York City Directory For 1846 and 1847, p. 379. 
The Evening Post, July 21, 1848, p. 2.
The Brooklyn Daily Eagle, June 26, 1879, p. 4. 

1846-1847 — George S. DREW, plumber.
Doggett’s New-York City Directory For 1846 and 1847, p. 121. 

1850-1867 — Henry MARSHALL, liquors.  “Porterhouse.”  Clerk of Tompkins’ Market.
The New York Mercantile Union Business Directory, 1850-1851, p. 327.  
Manual of the Corporation of the City of New York, 1861, p. 111. 
The New York State Business Directory and Gazetteer, 1867, p. 206. 

1877 — Charles BURGHART, beer. 
Goulding’s New York City Directory, 1877 to 1878, p. 182. 

1889 — Henry KOHLMEYER. 
Phillips’ Business Directory of New York City, Volume 19, p. 936. 

1898 — (Herman) Georg(e) SIEGEL, liquor.
New York State Department of Excise Directory of liquor tax certificate holders, p. 328. 

c. 1940-1957 J. Forest VEY (art student at Cooper Union) and wife Marguerite.  Actor Joel GREY rented from them, and Claude BROWN, author of “Manchild in the Promised Land,” lived there during that time as well.

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By LUCAS MAUTNER
The Joyce B. Cowin Women’s History Gallery
opened recently with an event to honor Cowin’s
contribution to the New York Historical Society.
Louise Mirrer, President, opened with a few
remarks. “I’m really delighted to see so many
of you at this wonderful celebration…and I am
also delighted to welcome you to the Saving
Washington exhibition,” she said.
The Saving Washington exhibition allows
visitors to look at the early days of the United
States through the eyes of the women of
the period. Books, letters, clothing, and other
important artifacts will be on display to the
public, part of a collection of over 150 objects.
“Saving Washington upends the familiar
narrative of our American founding as a power
struggle among men, offering the story of Dolly
Madison, and women of the early republic
more generally, as an example of how women’s
critical but often behind-the-scenes work gave
rise to the nation’s capital as a beacon for the
world,” Mirrer said.
Cowin, addressing the crowd with audible
emotion and pride, said, “In the end, after seeing
all these exceptional persons of our country—
who propelled us ahead—I strongly believe it is
we the people who try to help each other if we
can. We go forward—we build buildings—cre-
ate schools—support hospitals—we the people
go forward. Each of us will have a major trag-
edy in our lives. We mourn, we remember, and
we go forward. We follow the rules, and some
of us make the rules in the end. But it is we the
people that are the driving force of this great
country; we the people go forward.”
Saving Washington is housed in the new
Joyce B. Cowin Women’s History Gallery, in
the newly renovated fourth floor. Its doors will
open fully to the public in late April, where it
will host several programs, from conferences to
writing workshops to panel discussions. Some
of the upcoming events include an unveiling
of the personal archives of Billie Jean King
and a discussion about “Women and the White
House” moderated by 60 Minutes correspon-
dent Lesley Stahl. #
Joyce B. Cowin, an alumna of Teachers
College, Columbia University, is a philan-
thropist and founder of the Cowin Financial
Literacy Project, which aims to improve finan-
cial literacy among students.…

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Thomas Paine and The Flame Of Revolution“-from ThoughtGallery.org:

When: Thu., August 17, 2017 at 7:30 pm

This Olio covers the life and writing of Thomas Paine during the end of the 18th century. Starting with Common Sense and The Crisis Papers, the talk focuses on the integral role of Paine in not only the American Revolution, but the creation of an “American” political ideology.

The first part is a biographical sketch of Thomas Paine and description of the social and political climate in 18th century England. An explanation of conflicts leading up to the writing of Common Sense and The Declaration of Independence, the talks establishes a historical context for the American Revolution and the subsequent events in the young nation. Thomas Paine’s involvement in the revolution and his work for the Continental Congress place him in the center of activity.

The French Revolution signaled a new chapter in Paine’s life. Once again with The Rights of Man and The Age of Reason he was able to put into words the momentous spirit of the times. This Olio explains the characterization of Paine as a preeminent philosopher and the genesis of radical politics as a force in world events.

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The Cemetery will be open on Sunday, August 6th from noon to 6:00 pm.
Come and enjoy a lovely and rare afternoon inside the gates!

Welcome to the web site of The New York City Marble Cemetery.

You have most likely come here as part of genealogical research on your family and we are happy for you to visit. This site may well be of some help to you; we certainly hope so.

We also hope that you will be able to be of help to The New York City Marble Cemetery. The Board of Trustees is eager to update our files. If you are able to show a direct line of descent from any of the vault holders, you are entitled to participate in the management of the cemetery and, most particularly, the use of your family vault. Our annual meeting, open only to vault owners, is on the first Monday in May. Please contact the office for more details.

Whether you are interested in becoming more involved in the Cemetery or not, we would be very interested in any information you can offer about family members interred in the Cemetery and, if you desire, would be happy to post this information on our site.

The New York City Marble Cemetery is a small jewel of beauty and peace. Although we have a small endowment, it is not enough to maintain the cemetery as it could be or even should be. While the cemetery is generally closed to the public, entrance may be arranged by special appointment; a donation is requested for this service.

While there is no formal connection between the two cemeteries, you may also wish to visit the web site of the neighboring (and similarly named) New York Marble Cemetery.…

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