Category:

Things Not Allowed Today That Were OK To Do Back Then

Friday
Jan 19
Greenwich Village
New Yorkers have a tendency to romanticize bygone eras of city history: the jazzy ’20s; the gritty ’70s; or even the simpler times of the early 2010s. This weekend, the New Ohio Theatre on Christopher Street will re-create an iconic slab of ’60s infamy — the artist-haunted Chelsea Hotel. There will be cheap drinks, old tunes, and photographers shooting on film, all meant to evoke the infamous hotel. We suggest you read Patti Smith’s Just Kids to prepare.
Cost: $20 suggested donation at the door.

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Live-In Theater has come up with another interactive, participatory theater experience that is a dramatization based on real past events, in this case, the 1915 apprehension of 45-year-old Mary Mallon, called “Typhoid Mary” by the news media of the time. Reportedly, Mallon infected 51 people with Typhoid Fever, three of them died.

Alas, the one future performance of The Trial Of Typhoid Mary (Dec. 10th) on the online calendar of the Live-In Theater website is presently sold out, and no performances are (so far) scheduled for 2018.  However, your hope of seeing it may not be entirely lost. A stage manager told me that they do this production in “a lot of high schools” as well as “for private groups”. It has been around for a few years, and they performed it at The New York Historical Society in 2016.

Live-In Theater’s promotional materials for the show, “The Trial of Typhoid Mary” say, “Come give Typhoid Mary the trial she never received”. Ticketholders assemble (in this case, in the downstairs room of a Lower East Side bar), and a costumed re-enactor in solemn black who declared himself the judge set the scene, and chose various members of the audience to act the parts of jurors, bailiffs, and, at the performance I attended, a courtroom sketch artist. Another costumed re-enactor handed out golf pencils and notepads, and doubled as a “barker”. Though from the Colonial era to the mid-19th century, it was not unheard of for courts to be informally convened in taverns, (at least in Staten Island) by the end of the 19th century to the early 20th century (the time of Mary Mallon’s arrest for being a public health hazard), court proceedings had acquired a lot more formality and government control, not to mention proper courthouses. However, treatment of suspects under the premises of “innocent until proven guilty” had not advanced as much as it has now. I think the majority of the twenty- and thirty- something audience were properly horrified that Mallon had been arrested without a warrant, and some who questioned the actress who played Mallon on the stand clearly disapproved of the fact that she had not been read her rights (enforcement of this became a 1960s innovation), and had previously been summarily imprisoned on North Brother Island. Motivated perhaps by the role-playing of certain of the re-enactors, the suffragette who claimed to have been Mallon’s previous employer, who stressed that Mallon did not willfully infect others, and the one who played Mallon, who claimed to have nursed the family who got typhoid back to health, doing the more onerous duties, including washing soiled bedsheets, unlike in real life, they returned a verdict of innocent, though Mallon’s understanding of sanitary practices was to clean away all visible dirt, and she didn’t seem too concerned about whether she washed her hands “after she had been to the privy” if they were “not dirty”. All participants in this exercise had entered a time when “The Germ Theory of Disease” was as hotly debated and widely doubted as the phenomena of Global Warming is now, and with pretty much the same class divide between adherents.…

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Those Quirky Victorians
Learn About Those Quirky Victorians At A Free Public Lecture At Sotheby’s
570 Lexington Avenue 6th floor |
Tuesday, November 28th, 2017
7:00PM – 8:30PM

Sotheby’s Institute of Art Speaker Series Presents

Those Quirky Victorians: Re-purposed Traditions Through 21st Century Art,

 

Design and Science

 

The Victorian era was a time fertile in essential technological inventions, means of communication and artistic design. In the name of science, discovery,  amusement and financial gain Victorians collected profusely.  Parallel to the idea of progress was the reality of quirky hobbies, impractical contraptions and obsessive interests.

This panel aims to shed a light on a selection of impactful Victorian developments, namely the marriage of science and art in the reproduction of historical artifacts, the expansion of  landscape gardens as a reflection of urban necessity and the compulsion to craft individual identities through pictorial representation.

Panelists:

  • John D. Ward, Senior Vice President, Head of Silver Department, Sotheby’s
  • Barbara Frelinghuysen Israel, Owner, Barbara Israel Garden Antiques
  • Tim Hamilton, Generalist Appraiser, Gurr Johns

 

Moderator: Ann-Marie Richard, Director, MA Fine and Decorative Art and Design, Sotheby’s Institute of Art-NY

John D. Ward, Senior Vice President, Head of Silver Department, Sotheby’s

“The Department of Science and Art: Elkington reproductions of Silver Treasures”

John D. Ward joined Sotheby’s in 1997 and has presided over the strong slate of single-owner and various-owners Silver sales the company has offered in New York.Mr Ward presided over the Charles L Poor sale of Early English Silver, the Jaime Ortiz-Patiño sales of Lamerie and English Chinoiserie Silver, The Jeffords Collection of Early American Silver, The Bluhdorn Collection of Important English Silver and Silver-gilt, and the Thyssen Meissonnier Tureen, the second-highest price ever paid for Silver at auction. He also catalogued the English Silver of the Royal House of Hanover when that was offered in Germany in 2005. Mr Ward has placed works with the Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Gilbert Collection, Winterthur and other major institutions in Boston, Chicago, St Louis, Dallas, Houston, Baltimore, Los Angeles County and the British National Trust.  Mr Ward has a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Chicago and a Master’s degree in the History of Decorative Arts from the Bard Graduate Center for Studies in the Decorative Arts, New York.

 

Barbara Frelinghuysen Israel, Owner, Barbara Israel Garden Antiques

“Victorian Taste: Cemeteries, Botanicals and Overcrowded Gardens”

Barbara Frelinghuysen Israel founded Barbara Israel Garden Antiques in 1985, after a serendipitous purchase of a large collection of estate statuary lead her down the garden antiques path. Now in her 32st year in business, Barbara is recognized as an authority on the subject. Barbara’s exhaustively researched book, Antique Garden Ornament: Two Centuries of American Taste (1999), is the definitive work in the field. She is also the author of A Guide to Buying Antique Garden Ornament (2012), a user-friendly handbook packed with tips on conservation, identification and more.

As a dealer, Barbara collects the finest examples of garden ornament, guided by her appreciation for classical forms and her love of unusual, once-in-a-lifetime finds.

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Fashionably Strange: A History of Victorian Creepiness

October 22
Public

Hosted by Quimby’s Bookstore

Sunday, October 22 at 8:00 PM – 9:00 PM EDT
2 days from now · 17–22°Partly Cloudy
Details
Fashionably Strange: A History of Victorian Creepiness
A talk/slide show by J.R. Pepper
“There’s a general consensus in film and media that Victorians were a bit… odd to say the least. But what did they do that made them so odd, so strange, so creepy?
From professional mourning clothing, taxidermy, and an obsession with death to bizarre photography and fashionable communication with the spirit world, there’s no doubt that the Victorians were decidedly creepy. In this talk we will explore what made the Victorians the true masters of the macabre.”…

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Thursday Oct 19, 2017
7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

POWERHOUSE @ the Archway
28 Adams Street (Corner of Adams & Water Street @ the Archway)
Brooklyn , NY 11201

powerHouse Book Launch: STREET: New York City – 70s, 80s, 90s by Carrie Boretz — in conversation w/ Mark Bussell

 

RSVP appreciated:

Please fill out the “Bookings” form at the bottom of this page.

-or-

Send the name of the event and number of attendees to our RSVP email.
*Disregard the notification that will appear after Booking.*

PLEASE NOTE: Submitting an RSVP for this event DOES NOT guarantee entrance. This is a free-access event — entrance will be on a first-come, first-served basis.


 

About the Book:

The photographs in Street were taken by Carrie Boretz in New York City from the mid 1970s through the 1990s. It is common knowledge that the city was on rocky ground for many of those years but these are not pictures filled with drama or strife. Instead Boretz was always more interested in the subtle and familiar moments of everyday life in the various neighborhoods where she lived, before much of the graffiti was scrubbed away and the city sanitized and reborn to what it has since become.

For so many living in and visiting New York today, it is forgotten or altogether not known how different so many parts of the city were during that time. Many of these pictures show the reality of the streets then, where every day workers, the homeless, the affluent, and tourists all shared the common space, providing examples of how one of the greatest cities in the world was one often filled with contradictions. But there is also a timeless element to these images as children still play in the parks, streets, and schoolyards, commuters still face the elements daily as they wait, there are still regular demonstrations and parades, and the whole spectrum of the joys and pitfalls of humanity are still visible most anywhere a person looks.

For Boretz nothing was scripted, it all played out right before her. As Patti Smith said, “You need no rationale, no schooling. It’s love at first sight. You see something and you have to capture it. Instinctive, bang, you feel one with it.” Indeed, Boretz doesn’t have a philosophy about shooting other than trusting her instinct: she saw, she shot, she moved on, always looking for moments that made her heart beat faster. It was the continual rush of knowing that at any time she could come upon something real and beautiful. That is why and how she shot and why and how her Street is so special.

 

About the Photographer:

After graduating in 1975 from Washington University in St. Louis Carrie Boretz began her life as a New York City photographer a week later, landing an internship at the Village Voice. Over the next decade she photographed for The New York Times MagazineNew YorkSports Illustrated, People, Fortune, and Life. By the 1990s she was shooting almost daily for the New York Times‘s “Day” beat, one picture that revealed a slice of the city on that particular day.…

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From huck magazine:

The photographer who defined old-school cool

Street symphony

Posted
Text by Alex King
Photography © Jamal Shabazz

Jamel Shabazz has spent his life documenting the city that never sleeps. But while his shots of urban street style have become iconic, the bigger picture – a world of police and prostitutes, drifters and dancers – reveals something much deeper: a commitment to community.

It’s early morning in Rikers Island jail and a young corrections officer named Jamel Shabazz has just begun his first inspection. The residential wing is so hot that the stench of stale cigarettes and dead rodents hangs heavily.

There is a line of 30 units on both sides of the corridor, each one of them holding a juvenile inmate who may have trashed his cell, retreated to a corner or hung himself with a bed sheet.

“To make a physical count, you have to make sure a body is in each cell,” Jamel explains. And there is an abundance of bodies.

83_150dpi
It’s the mid-1980s and a crack epidemic is sweeping through New York City, generating a wave of violence that’s carrying thousands of young black men into the city’s prisons and morgues.

“It felt like being in a lifeboat watching a sinking ship and you can only help so many people,” says Jamel, thinking back to that time.

“But it didn’t stop me from going to work every single day looking for someone to connect with and provide direction to.”

Working in prison made Jamel’s mission clear to him: he became determined to steer young men away from ruining their lives, feeding a vicious cycle of regret. And it didn’t take long for him to realise how he’d do that.

Jamel_Shabazz_Little_Big_Man
Think of old-school hip hop and, chances are, you will conjure up one of Jamel Shabazz’s unforgettable portraits. Jamel came of age during the birth of rap in mid-70s New York. He remembers block parties in Coffey Park, Brooklyn, where a group of DJs and MCs would “hot-wire” the electricity supply of a lamppost to keep the party going long into the night.

His photobook Back in the Days immortalises the b-boys, boomboxes and big hair of 1980s New York City in one cornerstone document. But the purpose behind these images has often gone overlooked.

“I don’t get caught up on the fashion,” he says. “My photographs have always been about the personal connections I make in my attempt to communicate what’s going on in the streets.”

Rush-Hour-2
Jamel’s new book, Sights in the City, aims to redress that balance by showcasing his street photography in one place for the first time. It spans the duration of his career and illuminates the complex city that has defined his life.

Growing up in the Red Hook area of Brooklyn, Jamel discovered photography through his father, a naval combat photographer who taught him to carry a loaded camera at all times.

Initially borrowing his mother’s cheap Kodak, the 15-year-old began directing groups of his friends into poses and developing a signature style.

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From Thought Gallery NYC:
After the city’s Halloween festivities come to an end, New Yorkers will still be able to get a look at the city’s haunted histories at New York: City of the Dead on November 9, which offers an overview of the city’s cemeteries – including the secret ones hidden in some unlikely places.…

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Sat, October 14th, 2017 |

11:00 am to 4:00 pm

Free with Museum Admission
Recommended for all ages

On October 14, 1781, Lieutenant Colonel Alexander Hamilton made his famous charge to capture Redoubt Ten in the Battle of Yorktown. Come to the Museum ready with your questions for Hamilton! Portrayed by a Living Historian, Lt. Col. Hamilton tells you how he helped win the climactic campaign of the Revolutionary War. Don’t miss your chance to learn a military drill from the War for Independence under the instruction of Hamilton himself!

We’re celebrating Hamilton’s military career with Living History all weekend. Join us on Sunday to meet the New York City militia that Hamilton joined while he was still in school!


Living History Days at N-YHS
Living History: Hamilton’s Militia, Now Recruiting!
Sunday, October 15th, 2017 | 11:00 am – 4:00 pm

Free with Museum Admission
Recommended for all ages

Immerse yourself in the independent militia company that started Hamilton’s military career! Meet the Hearts of Oak, a troop of Living Historians who portray the group of young volunteers that came together in colonial New-York on the eve of the American Revolution in 1775. Some members of the militia, like Hamilton, were students at King’s College—known today as Columbia University! Take a close look at their distinctive green coats, listen to fife and drum music, and experience a military drill.

We’re celebrating Hamilton’s military career with Living History all weekend. On Saturdaymeet Lieutenant Colonel Alexander Hamilton and learn about his victory at the Battle of Yorktown that happened on this weekend in 1781!

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