Category:

Things Not Allowed Today That Were OK To Do Back Then

Fashionably Strange: A History of Victorian Creepiness

October 22
Public

Hosted by Quimby’s Bookstore

Sunday, October 22 at 8:00 PM – 9:00 PM EDT
2 days from now · 17–22°Partly Cloudy
Details
Fashionably Strange: A History of Victorian Creepiness
A talk/slide show by J.R. Pepper
“There’s a general consensus in film and media that Victorians were a bit… odd to say the least. But what did they do that made them so odd, so strange, so creepy?
From professional mourning clothing, taxidermy, and an obsession with death to bizarre photography and fashionable communication with the spirit world, there’s no doubt that the Victorians were decidedly creepy. In this talk we will explore what made the Victorians the true masters of the macabre.”…

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Thursday Oct 19, 2017
7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

POWERHOUSE @ the Archway
28 Adams Street (Corner of Adams & Water Street @ the Archway)
Brooklyn , NY 11201

powerHouse Book Launch: STREET: New York City – 70s, 80s, 90s by Carrie Boretz — in conversation w/ Mark Bussell

 

RSVP appreciated:

Please fill out the “Bookings” form at the bottom of this page.

-or-

Send the name of the event and number of attendees to our RSVP email.
*Disregard the notification that will appear after Booking.*

PLEASE NOTE: Submitting an RSVP for this event DOES NOT guarantee entrance. This is a free-access event — entrance will be on a first-come, first-served basis.


 

About the Book:

The photographs in Street were taken by Carrie Boretz in New York City from the mid 1970s through the 1990s. It is common knowledge that the city was on rocky ground for many of those years but these are not pictures filled with drama or strife. Instead Boretz was always more interested in the subtle and familiar moments of everyday life in the various neighborhoods where she lived, before much of the graffiti was scrubbed away and the city sanitized and reborn to what it has since become.

For so many living in and visiting New York today, it is forgotten or altogether not known how different so many parts of the city were during that time. Many of these pictures show the reality of the streets then, where every day workers, the homeless, the affluent, and tourists all shared the common space, providing examples of how one of the greatest cities in the world was one often filled with contradictions. But there is also a timeless element to these images as children still play in the parks, streets, and schoolyards, commuters still face the elements daily as they wait, there are still regular demonstrations and parades, and the whole spectrum of the joys and pitfalls of humanity are still visible most anywhere a person looks.

For Boretz nothing was scripted, it all played out right before her. As Patti Smith said, “You need no rationale, no schooling. It’s love at first sight. You see something and you have to capture it. Instinctive, bang, you feel one with it.” Indeed, Boretz doesn’t have a philosophy about shooting other than trusting her instinct: she saw, she shot, she moved on, always looking for moments that made her heart beat faster. It was the continual rush of knowing that at any time she could come upon something real and beautiful. That is why and how she shot and why and how her Street is so special.

 

About the Photographer:

After graduating in 1975 from Washington University in St. Louis Carrie Boretz began her life as a New York City photographer a week later, landing an internship at the Village Voice. Over the next decade she photographed for The New York Times MagazineNew YorkSports Illustrated, People, Fortune, and Life. By the 1990s she was shooting almost daily for the New York Times‘s “Day” beat, one picture that revealed a slice of the city on that particular day.…

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From huck magazine:

The photographer who defined old-school cool

Street symphony

Posted
Text by Alex King
Photography © Jamal Shabazz

Jamel Shabazz has spent his life documenting the city that never sleeps. But while his shots of urban street style have become iconic, the bigger picture – a world of police and prostitutes, drifters and dancers – reveals something much deeper: a commitment to community.

It’s early morning in Rikers Island jail and a young corrections officer named Jamel Shabazz has just begun his first inspection. The residential wing is so hot that the stench of stale cigarettes and dead rodents hangs heavily.

There is a line of 30 units on both sides of the corridor, each one of them holding a juvenile inmate who may have trashed his cell, retreated to a corner or hung himself with a bed sheet.

“To make a physical count, you have to make sure a body is in each cell,” Jamel explains. And there is an abundance of bodies.

83_150dpi
It’s the mid-1980s and a crack epidemic is sweeping through New York City, generating a wave of violence that’s carrying thousands of young black men into the city’s prisons and morgues.

“It felt like being in a lifeboat watching a sinking ship and you can only help so many people,” says Jamel, thinking back to that time.

“But it didn’t stop me from going to work every single day looking for someone to connect with and provide direction to.”

Working in prison made Jamel’s mission clear to him: he became determined to steer young men away from ruining their lives, feeding a vicious cycle of regret. And it didn’t take long for him to realise how he’d do that.

Jamel_Shabazz_Little_Big_Man
Think of old-school hip hop and, chances are, you will conjure up one of Jamel Shabazz’s unforgettable portraits. Jamel came of age during the birth of rap in mid-70s New York. He remembers block parties in Coffey Park, Brooklyn, where a group of DJs and MCs would “hot-wire” the electricity supply of a lamppost to keep the party going long into the night.

His photobook Back in the Days immortalises the b-boys, boomboxes and big hair of 1980s New York City in one cornerstone document. But the purpose behind these images has often gone overlooked.

“I don’t get caught up on the fashion,” he says. “My photographs have always been about the personal connections I make in my attempt to communicate what’s going on in the streets.”

Rush-Hour-2
Jamel’s new book, Sights in the City, aims to redress that balance by showcasing his street photography in one place for the first time. It spans the duration of his career and illuminates the complex city that has defined his life.

Growing up in the Red Hook area of Brooklyn, Jamel discovered photography through his father, a naval combat photographer who taught him to carry a loaded camera at all times.

Initially borrowing his mother’s cheap Kodak, the 15-year-old began directing groups of his friends into poses and developing a signature style.

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From Thought Gallery NYC:
After the city’s Halloween festivities come to an end, New Yorkers will still be able to get a look at the city’s haunted histories at New York: City of the Dead on November 9, which offers an overview of the city’s cemeteries – including the secret ones hidden in some unlikely places.…

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Sat, October 14th, 2017 |

11:00 am to 4:00 pm

Free with Museum Admission
Recommended for all ages

On October 14, 1781, Lieutenant Colonel Alexander Hamilton made his famous charge to capture Redoubt Ten in the Battle of Yorktown. Come to the Museum ready with your questions for Hamilton! Portrayed by a Living Historian, Lt. Col. Hamilton tells you how he helped win the climactic campaign of the Revolutionary War. Don’t miss your chance to learn a military drill from the War for Independence under the instruction of Hamilton himself!

We’re celebrating Hamilton’s military career with Living History all weekend. Join us on Sunday to meet the New York City militia that Hamilton joined while he was still in school!


Living History Days at N-YHS
Living History: Hamilton’s Militia, Now Recruiting!
Sunday, October 15th, 2017 | 11:00 am – 4:00 pm

Free with Museum Admission
Recommended for all ages

Immerse yourself in the independent militia company that started Hamilton’s military career! Meet the Hearts of Oak, a troop of Living Historians who portray the group of young volunteers that came together in colonial New-York on the eve of the American Revolution in 1775. Some members of the militia, like Hamilton, were students at King’s College—known today as Columbia University! Take a close look at their distinctive green coats, listen to fife and drum music, and experience a military drill.

We’re celebrating Hamilton’s military career with Living History all weekend. On Saturdaymeet Lieutenant Colonel Alexander Hamilton and learn about his victory at the Battle of Yorktown that happened on this weekend in 1781!

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From The New York Post:

Bronx Community College removes Confederate busts

The busts of two Confederate generals have been swiftly removed from Bronx Community College amid a national conversation about the relics — but the school left the bust of one racist scientist in place, The Post has learned.

In a purge for which various officials took credit, the monuments to Confederate leaders Robert E. Lee and Stonewall Jackson unceremoniously disappeared from an open-air sculpture gallery overnight Thursday.

Bronx Borough President Ruben Diaz Jr. has called the presence of Confederate icons in his borough “especially galling,” leading Gov. Cuomo to say they had to go “because New York stands against racism.”College President Thomas Isekenegbe also pledged to replace the busts with other historical figures that would help create a “space where all people feel respected, welcomed, and valued.”

In their rush to remove Confederates and sanitize the school’s “Hall of Fame for Great Americans,” officials left the bronze bust of the racist, 19th-century scientist Louis Agassiz.

The Swiss-born paleontologist landed a professorship at Harvard following a wildly successful American lecture tour in 1846, and he was ­instrumental in establishing the Ivy League school’s Museum of Comparative Zoology, the first publicly funded science building in North America.

Agassiz was the country’s most famous scientist when he died in 1873, but his reputation eventually suffered because of what the University of California Museum of Paleontology calls “his racist attitudes, which were extreme even for his day.”

“Agassiz could not accept that all groups of humans belonged to the same species, and he argued vehemently for the inferiority of non-white human groups,” according to the museum’s Web site.

The move came amid continuing outrage over the deadly violence that erupted at a rally of white supremacists who gathered in Charlottesville, Va., last Saturday to protest the planned removal of a Lee statue.

“That’s pretty f–ked up. We are all people. We bleed the same color,” said Daniel Roman, 20, who was passing through the college campus Friday evening. “Especially with what’s going on in the South, he can go f- -k himself. I’m all about equality.”

 

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Island Historical Tour (North)

Thursday, September 7, 2017

6:00 p.m.7:30 p.m.

This event repeats on the 1st Thursday of every 2 months between 5/4/2017 and 9/7/2017.

Did you know that the Randall’s Island was once three separate land masses? The island has a rich and unique history. Come learn more about the influential people, the bridges, and the landscape changes that transformed the Randall’s Island into the beautiful park it is today!

Location

Randall’s Island Connector in Randall’s Island Park
Manhattan

Directions to this location

Cost

Free

Event Organizer

Randall’s Island

Contact Number

(212) 860-1899

Contact Email

info@randallsisland.org

Categories

Education, Nature, History, Tours, Waterfront

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Date

Sep 6, 2017 • 7:00 PM – 9:00 PM

Cost

FREE and OPEN TO THE PUBLIC!

Location

Gallery at BRIC House

647 Fulton Street
(Enter on Rockwell Place)
Brooklyn, NY 11217

United States
Get Directions

Sergio Purtell, courtesy of the artist and Art 3 Gallery, Brooklyn

JOIN US FOR THE OPENING RECEPTION!

EXHIBITION ON VIEW: September 7 – October 29, 2017

CURATED BY: Elizabeth Ferrer

 

Brooklyn Photographs brings together the work of 11 photographers who have turned their lens on the Brooklyn experience from the late 1960s to the present.  Each of these photographers will present a body of work on a specific theme – childhood in Williamsburg in the 1960s, Halloween in the 1970s, or Bushwick street life in the 1980s, to name a few.  More recent work from the last decade will explore such subjects as the rapidly gentrifying post-industrial landscape, Brooklyn artists, and the microcosm of street life visible near BRIC’s facility at the intersection of Fulton and Flatbush.  In sum, the exhibition will illuminate the important role that photography has had in preserving aspects of Brooklyn’s neighborhoods and traditions, and in documenting the extraordinary cultural and social diversity that is a hallmark of the borough.  It will also reflect the borough as a site of continual change. Neighborhoods transform and new populations emerge, while the essence of Brooklyn’s humanity remains. The exhibition will be accompanied by a catalogue and by public programs.

Photographers include: Yolanda Andrade, Stefanie Apple, Nelson Bakerman, Leigh Davis, Max Kozloff, George Malave, Meryl Meisler, Patrick D. Pagnano, Sergio Purtell, Larry Racioppo, and Russell Frederick .

READ ABOUT THE EXHIBITION IN THE NEW YORK TIMES LENS BLOG >>

Special thanks to Duggal Visual Solutions, Griffin Editions, and Pranayama Art for their services in relation to this exhibition.

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https://www.facebook.com/TheLostVillage2017/

I came by this information in a paper insert that was in my program for the opening reception of “Storefronts: Oral History & Photo Exhibition”:
“The Lost Village” is a stunning indictment of the corporate take-over of Greenwich Village…made possible by complicit…politicians…the bohemian, artistic world which gave the area its colorful, distinctive flavor has fled…former mom and pop shops closed. The Village is a microcosm of what is happening across the United States where the disparity of income between rich and poor is now higher than at any time in our history. This extraordinary documentary raises the alarm and…offers a way to counter such take-overs through citizen activism…A must see.” James Cass Rogers
Two upcoming Screenings-in what’s left of the Village:
SEP 7
Thu 7 PM · Jefferson Market Library · New York
SEP 10
Sun 7 PM · Judson Memorial Church – New York City · New York
Film

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Howl Happening Opening Night Sept. 10th

Sep. 10 – Oct. 06, 2017
56 Bleecker Gallery and Late 80s New York
Presented by Some Serious Business
and Howl! Happening: An Arturo Vega Project

Lust of glory pricked their hearts up, dread of shame
Struck them tame;
And that glory and that shame alike, the gold
Bought and sold.
-Robert Browning, Love Among The Ruins

Let’s also say that change is neither good or bad. It simply is. It can be greeted with terror or joy. A tantrum that says, ‘I want it the way it was’ or a dance that says, ‘Look, it’s something new.’
–Don Draper, Mad Men (AMC)

Some Serious Business and Howl! Happening are pleased to present Love Among The Ruins, co-curated by Susan Martin, founding director of Some Serious Business; Bill Stelling, 56 Bleecker gallery director and founder of the groundbreaking FUN Gallery with Patti Astor; and artist Maynard Monrow. All three curators were close friends of Dean Rolston, co-owner of 56 Bleecker who serves as inspiration for the exhibition.

Artists in this retrospective include:
Austė, Suzanne Anker, Donald Baechler, Sylvie Ball, Jean-Michel Basquiat, Julian Beck, Bill Beckley, Mike Berg, John Bowman, Jeff Carpenter, Stefano Castronovo, George Condo, Arch Connelly, Bruce Conner, Scott Covert, Ingrid Dinter, Arnold Fern, Vincent Gallo, Graham Gillmore, Allen Ginsberg, Nan Goldin, Eric Goode, Robert Hawkins, Roberto Juarez, Scott Kilgour, Ruth Kligman, Norman Korpi, Joyce Kozloff, Tseng Kwong Chi, David LaChapelle, Greer Lankton, Claire Lieberman, Daniel Mahoney, Frank Majore, Fidel Márquez, Sylvia Martins, McDermott & McGough, Taylor Mead, Nicholas Mouffarrege, David Nelson, Felix Pène du Bois, Jeff Perrone, Elizabeth Peyton, William Rand, Elaine Reicheck, Rene Ricard, Bill Rice, Alexis Rockman, Nicolas Rule, Vittorio Scarpati, Bruno Schmidt, Jo Shane, Mark Sink, Stephen Sprouse, Ken Tisa, Noel Vietor, William Wegman, Dondi White, Martin Wong, Thomas Woodruff, and Jimmy Wright.

56 Bleecker Gallery held a unique position in the late 80’s art world. Part serious gallery, part happening, the space was a scene that reflected the explosive intersection of art, performance, music, fashion and the incredible nightlife culture of that era.

Featuring many of the most cutting edge artists of the time, such as Stephen Sprouse and David LaChapelle, it also presented rigorously serious shows of artists like Bruce Conner and Elaine Reichek. The space was a forum for nightclub impresario Eric Goode to produce an installation that was a window into his future endeavors. Taylor Mead directed the gallery’s historic performance of Jackie Curtis’ Glamour, Glory and Gold featuring legendary actors Ondine, John Heys, Penny Arcade, Harry Koutoukas and Margot Howard-Howard.

56 Bleecker was a ‘scene’ as much as a venue for art. Openings featured guests as diverse as Stavros Niarchos, Richard Gere, Lauren Hutton, Fab 5 Freddy and Henry Geldzahler. Rene Ricard held court in the famous ‘Tin Room,’ anointing those in favor and banishing his enemies to NoHo Star.

While it was a time of enormous creativity, it was also one of deep sorrow. The exhibition will touch upon the impact of AIDS on our community.

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