Category:

Beaches, Parks, and Amusement Parks

Island Historical Tour (North)

Thursday, September 7, 2017

6:00 p.m.7:30 p.m.

This event repeats on the 1st Thursday of every 2 months between 5/4/2017 and 9/7/2017.

Did you know that the Randall’s Island was once three separate land masses? The island has a rich and unique history. Come learn more about the influential people, the bridges, and the landscape changes that transformed the Randall’s Island into the beautiful park it is today!

Location

Randall’s Island Connector in Randall’s Island Park
Manhattan

Directions to this location

Cost

Free

Event Organizer

Randall’s Island

Contact Number

(212) 860-1899

Contact Email

info@randallsisland.org

Categories

Education, Nature, History, Tours, Waterfront

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In their special section “Summer Fun in Staten Island,” published on June 28, 2017, the New York Daily News said that our monthly Sea Shanty Sessions, led by the Folk Music Society of New York, offer “…a great opportunity to experience authentic, time-honored maritime songs in an appropriately historic setting.” The next session is this Sunday, August 20, from 2 to 5 PM. This even is family friendly and free, but we always appreciate your donations. #NYCulture

Image may contain: 8 people, people smiling

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Thomas Paine and The Flame Of Revolution“-from ThoughtGallery.org:

When: Thu., August 17, 2017 at 7:30 pm

This Olio covers the life and writing of Thomas Paine during the end of the 18th century. Starting with Common Sense and The Crisis Papers, the talk focuses on the integral role of Paine in not only the American Revolution, but the creation of an “American” political ideology.

The first part is a biographical sketch of Thomas Paine and description of the social and political climate in 18th century England. An explanation of conflicts leading up to the writing of Common Sense and The Declaration of Independence, the talks establishes a historical context for the American Revolution and the subsequent events in the young nation. Thomas Paine’s involvement in the revolution and his work for the Continental Congress place him in the center of activity.

The French Revolution signaled a new chapter in Paine’s life. Once again with The Rights of Man and The Age of Reason he was able to put into words the momentous spirit of the times. This Olio explains the characterization of Paine as a preeminent philosopher and the genesis of radical politics as a force in world events.

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From Governors Island official calendar: Civil War Weekend 2017
Aug 12, 2017 – Aug 13
10:00 am – 4:30 pm
Governors Island National Monument
Presented by the National Park ServiceMeet Union soldiers in the Soldier’s camp, watch musket and artillery firing demonstrations, and listen to Civil War music performances!

Artillery Demonstration and Small Arms Demonstration
Watch us fire a real 1860s-era cannon and demonstrate a variety of muskets soldiers would have used during that time period.

Getting There
5 Minutes from Soissons Landing 10 Minutes from Yankee Pier
3 Minutes from Soissons Landing 5 Minutes from Yankee Pier

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The Cemetery will be open on Sunday, August 6th from noon to 6:00 pm.
Come and enjoy a lovely and rare afternoon inside the gates!

Welcome to the web site of The New York City Marble Cemetery.

You have most likely come here as part of genealogical research on your family and we are happy for you to visit. This site may well be of some help to you; we certainly hope so.

We also hope that you will be able to be of help to The New York City Marble Cemetery. The Board of Trustees is eager to update our files. If you are able to show a direct line of descent from any of the vault holders, you are entitled to participate in the management of the cemetery and, most particularly, the use of your family vault. Our annual meeting, open only to vault owners, is on the first Monday in May. Please contact the office for more details.

Whether you are interested in becoming more involved in the Cemetery or not, we would be very interested in any information you can offer about family members interred in the Cemetery and, if you desire, would be happy to post this information on our site.

The New York City Marble Cemetery is a small jewel of beauty and peace. Although we have a small endowment, it is not enough to maintain the cemetery as it could be or even should be. While the cemetery is generally closed to the public, entrance may be arranged by special appointment; a donation is requested for this service.

While there is no formal connection between the two cemeteries, you may also wish to visit the web site of the neighboring (and similarly named) New York Marble Cemetery.…

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From Hyperallergic:


Aerial view up the East River (May 27, 1960, photo by Theodore V. Donaldson)
Aerial view up the East River (May 27, 1960, photo by Theodore V. Donaldson) (all images courtesy NYC Municipal Archives)

The Brooklyn waterfront is radically changing. The Domino Sugar Factory in Williamsburg is transforming into residential and commercial space, both inside its hollowed-out brick building and outside with new glassy high-rises. Towers are pending for long-quiet Greenpoint. And Brooklyn Bridge Park is altering the former industrial area of Dumbo and Brooklyn Heights with green space and, naturally, condos. It’s from the perspective of that park that the NYC Municipal Archives examined the East River shore’s long history of change.

A Century on the Brooklyn Waterfront was one of the shipping container exhibitions at Photoville, held earlier this month in the Pier 5 Uplands in Brooklyn Bridge Park. Curated by Public Records Officer Quinn Berkman and Paper and Archival Conservator Cynthia Brenwall, the exhibition drew on the NYC Municipal Archives’ 221,000 cubic feet of material, particularly its collections on the WPA Federal Writers’ and Art projects (1935–43) and the Department of Bridges (1901–39).

“The ability to appreciate what parks were before they were public recreational areas is important, and the Brooklyn Bridge Park is so relevant because the transformation is so recent,” Berkman told Hyperallergic. Many of the photographs were printed from glass plate negatives, and date from between 1870 and 1974, revealing the rise of the Brooklyn Bridge, and the concentration of maritime commercial activity on the Brooklyn piers long before they were replaced with parks.

View of Lower Manhattan from the Brooklyn Tower of the Brooklyn Bridge (1890)
View of Lower Manhattan from the Brooklyn Tower of the Brooklyn Bridge (1890) (click to enlarge)

“I think it is important to remember that Brooklyn was the heart of the city’s import business,” Berkman explained. “What is now seen as real estate opportunity was once used purely for the ports and trade industry.” It was only in the 1970s that the area was designated as a landmarked neighborhood and the repurposing of warehouses began. “It’s pretty incredible because once the Brooklyn Bridge opened, this part of Brooklyn was considered Manhattan’s first suburb, however by the 60s it cycled back into an industrial zone and now it is back to being a residential neighborhood,” she added.

The NYC Municipal Archives has recently been making more of its photographs accessible online, from the documentation of the NYPD’s “Alien Squad,” which monitored potentially subversive political groups in the 1930s and ’40s, to the around 30,000 crime photographs from 1914 to 1975 released earlier this year. As the photographs were taken for municipal government use — during the construction of the Brooklyn-Queens Expressway or the renovation of the Brooklyn Piers, for instance — some of the creators’ names are now lost. In addition to their original purposes, they now form an essential record of the city’s changing character.

“These photographs are not just ‘iconic’ images of old NYC, they are used to understand and preserve the history of the city,” Berkman said. “Photography is one of the best mediums to use to tell a story and send a message, which is also why it has just as complex of a history as New York does.”

View of the Manhattan Bridge from Jay and York Streets (January 4, 1912, photo by Eugene de Salignac)
View of the Manhattan Bridge from Jay and York Streets (January 4, 1912, photo by Eugene de Salignac)
Aerial view of the Brooklyn-Queens Expressway and Atlantic Avenue (September 19, 1956)
Aerial view of the Brooklyn-Queens Expressway and Atlantic Avenue (September 19, 1956)
Aerial view taken above Atlantic Avenue and the Brooklyn-Queens Expressway. 1 Brooklyn Bridge Park was once home to the New York Dock Company. (September 19, 1956) (photo by Theodore V. Donaldson)
Aerial view taken above Atlantic Avenue and the Brooklyn-Queens Expressway.

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When: Wed., July 26, 2017 at 6:30 pm

In honor of the 2017 New York State Centennial of Women’s Suffrage, Humanities New York invites you to converse with a panel of women from the fields of journalism, history and community organizing to look back on the history of women’s rights and discuss what’s next.

Our panelists are Tamika Mallory, one of the co-chairs of last January’s Women’s March; Jessa Crispin, author of Why I Am Not a Feminist; Kim Phillips-Fein, Associate Professor of American History at New York University; and Sarah Seidman, historian and curator at the Museum of the City of New York. Jia Tolentino of The New Yorker will moderate. Presented in Partnership with the National Park Service and the Museum of the City of New York.

Complimentary refreshments prior to the event.

Presented in partnership with National Parks of New York Harbor Conservancy and the Museum of the City of New York.

Federal Hall
26 Wall Street
New York, NY 10005

212-233-1131

Free

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JUN24

Victorian Picnic – June 24, 2017 (RAIN DATE: JULY 8)

Public

  • Saturday, June 24 at 1:00 PM5:00 PM EDT
    Starts in about 6 hours · 23° Heavy Rain
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    Central Park

    5 Av To Central Park W, 59 St To 110 St, Manhattan, New York 10022Saturday, June 24, 2017
    1:00 p.m.
    meet at 103rd Street and Central Park West
    RAIN DATE:
    Saturday, July 8IF IT RAINS, WE WILL ANNOUNCE RESCHEDULING PLANS BY 10:30 AM

    As the sunny days grow longer, one often desires a happy excursion to whittle away the hours with friends. What better way to do so than with a Victorian picnic? Join the New York 19th Century Society for an afternoon of dining al fresco, good conversation, reading aloud, lawn games of the gentler sort, and photography.

    Bring food or drink to share. Suggested attire (not required): summer whites, garden party frocks, tea dress, steampunk, Goth, or Lolita.

    We will gather at 103rd Street and Central Park West. Once everyone is assembled, we’ll find a quiet meadow in the North Woods nearby to spread our blankets and enjoy food and drink.

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From Flushing Town Hall:

Taking it to the Streets: 1950s NY through the Lens of Flushing Photographer Frank Oscar Larson

June 25th, 2017 – August 6th, 2017

Taking it to the Streets: 1950s NY through the Lens of Flushing Photographer Frank Oscar Larson

tickets

Before cell phones documented nearly every aspect of daily life, street photographers captured the humble, the mundane, and the ordinary. Flushing resident Frank Larson documented New York in the 1950s. When we view Larson’s work 60 years later, we still see ourselves, even if New York has changed around us.

Opening Reception: SUN, JUNE 25, 1-3 PM Lecture: WED, JUNE 28, 6-8 PM

 

Photography Tour & Lesson: SUN, JULY 9 & 16, 2 PM (more info here)

 

Gallery Dates: SUN, JUNE 25 – SUN, AUG 6

 

Gallery Hours: SAT & SUN, 12-5 PM

 

 

$5 Suggested Donation/FREE for Members & Students 

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A Description of the New York Central Park, with Maureen Meister, art historian, professor, and author.

Thursday, June 15, 2017, 6:30 p.m.

Program Locations:

Fully accessible to wheelchairs
First come, first served

This illustrated lecture reintroduces readers to A Description of the New York Central Park, published in 1869 and widely considered the most important book about the park to appear during its early years.

Events at The New York Public Library may be photographed or recorded. By attending these events, you consent to the use of your image and voice by the Library for all purposes.

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