Category:

Restaurants

From Spoiled NYC:

The Sound of Silence: A Tribute To Webster Hall

Subscribe to spoiled NYC’s official newsletter, The Stoop, for the best news, eats, drinks, places to go, and things to do.

For 131 years, Webster Hall has hosted some of the world’s biggest musical acts. Today it closes its doors– at least until it reopens under new ownership, sold in a deal worth an estimated $35 million.

The space, with a maximum capacity of 2,500 people, served as a nightclub, concert venue, corporate events space, and recording studio.

It will reopen in either 2019 or 2020 as the newly christened Spectrum Hall, its space restricted to concerts and sporting events.

I received the phone call in early May. A friend of mine told me management had served all Webster Hall employees with termination notices.

True, it had been a couple of years since I’d set foot in the venue, but a part of me heaved a pained sigh for yet another victim of the city’s changing landscape, for the many dances I’d shared with fellow miscreants who streamed into the place, their wrists ablaze with the shades of kandi bracelets and multi-colored fluffies.

I remembered the faces of the girls I kissed as vividly as I recalled those of the men I kissed– or shyly didn’t kiss. I recoiled at the memory of the crappy wage I made at the time, of the overpriced drinks, the even more overpriced water bottles, a precious commodity in a space that scorched with summer heat even in midwinter.

The people I met there ran the gamut, from frat bros with cockeyed grins, to scene kids with more gumption than me, roadsters who surveyed groups of three or more, code switching and peddling ketamine all the while.

Mirrored behavior existed on the far more spacious dance floor at Amazura Concert Hall in Queens or the even more cramped Electric Warehouse in Brooklyn, and the East Village had long given way to millennial kink, this host of music, bodies, motion, and silent exchanges in bathroom stalls.

“Webster had that old-time New York grunge that made you feel like you were part of the 19th century, in the sense that “fun” could easily involve trying to locate your stolen purse/phone,” says Michael Yates, formerly of Harlem and now living in Los Angeles.

“I’ll miss it. I’m sure the new version of the inside will look fantastic and modern and have a pleasant aroma. Old style Webster Hall was my first immersion into NYC’s EDM scene at the time. It was a place that was magical in the dark, probably because it would look awful when illuminated by sunlight.”

websterhall Having our friend @Halsey visit for an intimate show in the The Studio at Webster Hall tonight before we close for renovations in August. Stay tuned for more surprise shows leading up till then!

The venue, Yates continues, is a “perfect example” of New York City’s infrastructure.

Continue reading

Don’t know how “Jazz Age” or Burlesque the actual performance is, but McKitterick Hotel is itself from a bygone era, and there’s the “1930s train car”. A Gilt City discount voucher for the current performances is available:

Activities & Events Chelsea
Whether you’re dining in the 1930s train car, on the twinkling rooftop garden, or jumping straight into the infamous “Sleep No More” performance, you’re sure to expect a night unlike any other.
About the performance:

Described as “thrilling, mind-bending… [u]nlike anything you’ve ever seen,” by the New York Post, “Sleep No More” has been delighting New York audiences since 2011. The interactive play, produced by Emursive and award-winning London theater company Punchdrunk, presents a loose adaptation of Shakespeare’s “Macbeth” through a film noir lens. Set at the fictional McKittrick Hotel (a former industrial space in West Chelsea), the experience begins in the Manderley Bar, where audience members are given masks and instructed to remain silent throughout the show. From there, they’re transported via elevator to one of the hotel’s five floors and let loose for the next few hours.

Wander through a cemetery, insane asylum and doctor’s office or follow an actor from scene to scene, taking in interpretive pantomime and dance sequences. Since you choose your own path through the story, your experience will be entirely unique. There’s no way of telling just what may happen.

What we love

  • Esteemed chefs Lee Hanson and Riad Nasr (Balthazar, Minetta Tavern) have taken over the McKittrick Hotel for the summer with the “Club Car,” a one-of-a-kind dining experience.
  • Seated inside a 1930s style train car-turned-restaurant, you’ll enjoy a surf-and-turf prix fixe menu that boasts flavors from old French and New York steakhouses with seafood inspirations from New Orleans.
  • Start off with doughy Parker House rolls and crudités before the main event of the dinner: a dry-age boneless rib-eye topped. The “surf” part of the meal changes daily and can range from scallops with romesco butter to soft shell crab.
  • Finish the decadent meal with a citrusy lemon chiffon cake or chocolate caramel tart and take in the dimly lit ambiance.

What to know

  • Redeem by Thu 08/31/17
  • Offer is final sale and non-refundable
  • Must be 21+ to consume alcohol; valid government ID required
  • Valid Thursday – Saturday
  • To view menu, please click here
  • Reservations are required and subject to availability; please book in advance of desired date
  • Gratuity is not included; we recommend tipping on the full value of service(s)
  • Tax is not included and will be charged upon redemption
  • Vouchers cannot be combined for multiple services
  • Offer cannot be combined with any other discounts or promotions
  • Voucher may be used to obtain the discount until August 31, 2017; after this date, the voucher is valid for the amount paid for five years from date of purchase, longer if provided by law
  • Photo credits: Jenny Anderson (Slides 1 and 4), DrielyS (Slide 2), Conor Harrigan (Slides 3 and 5) and Giafrese (Slide 6)

Continue reading

Mon 07 2017 , by

Up On The Roof

From the blog of The Museum of the City of New York:

Up on the roof, entertainment en plein air

Spring in New York City is glorious.  Allergy issues aside, the season of rebirth is especially welcome after this winter’s polar vortex shenanigans.  And though I celebrate the sunny days and refreshing rain of spring, I can see the heat waves forming on the horizon.  Summer is coming and with it a suffocating wall of humidity.

One of my best strategies to beat the heat is going to the theater. Be it a movie, musical, or play,  the cool darkness of a theater combined with a few hours of entertainment is my preferred place to be on an unbearably hot day.  A hundred years ago, this wasn’t so much the case.  Without air conditioning, the heat of the lights and the crush of fellow audience members could make visiting the theater  intolerable.  Not wishing to lose business during the summer months, theater owners came up with a new strategy: the roof!

Byron Company (New York, N.Y.) [Roof Garden, Madison Square Garden Theatre.] ca. 1900.

Byron Company (New York, N.Y.) Roof Garden, Madison Square Garden Theatre. ca. 1900. Museum of the City of New York, 93.1.1.10866.

In the photograph above, a rooftop audience enjoys some light entertainment on the Madison Square Garden roof.  This MSG was located at 26th Street and Madison Avenue.  Designed by Stanford White, it was the second tallest building in the City at the time construction finished in 1890. Part of the fun for the audience was the chance to watch musical comedies and operettas from 32 stories off the ground. (Check out Mia’s early blog on the theater’s Diana statue.)

Further uptown at 44th and Broadway, the New York Theatre roof offered similar entertainment fare. The New York Theatre was originally built as the Olympia Theatre by  Oscar Hammerstein I (the grandfather of the Oscar Hammerstein from musical theater’s famous “Rodgers & Hammerstein”).

Byron Company (New York, N.Y.) Roof Garden, New York Theatre. ca. 1901. Museum of the City of New York. 93.1.1.10880.

Byron Company (New York, N.Y.) Roof Garden, New York Theatre. ca. 1901. Museum of the City of New York. 93.1.1.10880.

Though a financial failure for Hammerstein I, the theater was only the second to be built in what would become the Times Square Theater District.  In 1895, the area was known as Longacre Square.

Byron Company (New York, N.Y.) Roof Garden, New York Theatre. ca. 1901. Museum of the City of New York, 93.1.1.10877.

Byron Company (New York, N.Y.) Roof Garden, New York Theatre. ca. 1901. Museum of the City of New York, 93.1.1.10877.

Hammerstein I’s second effort at extravagant outdoor entertainment was the  Paradise Roof Garden at 201 West 42nd Street.  Part enclosed space and part open air, the Garden spanned the roofs of  the Victoria Theatre and the Theatre Republic next door.

Byron Company (New York, N.Y.). [Roof Garden, Paradise atop Hammerstein's Victoria.] ca. 1904.

Byron Company (New York, N.Y.). Roof Garden, Paradise atop Hammerstein’s Victoria.]ca. 1901. Museum of the City of New York, 93.1.1.10856.

The Paradise Roof Garden was run by Hammerstein I’s son Willie.  As the noise of an ever expanding New York drifted upward, the vaudeville shows presented on the roof adapted to include wordless routines and pantomime.

Byron Company (New York, N.Y.) [Roof Garden, Paradise atop Hammerstein's Victoria.] ca. 1904.

Byron Company (New York, N.Y.). Roof Garden, Paradise atop Hammerstein’s Victoria. ca.

Continue reading

Monday July 24

 

6:30 PM  –  8:00 PM

Nuyorican Poets Café, 236 E 3rd St

Since it opened in 1854, McSorley’s Old Ale House has been a New York institution. This is the landmark watering hole where Abraham Lincoln campaigned and Boss Tweed kicked back with the Tammany Hall machine; where a pair of Houdini’s handcuffs found their final resting place;and where soldiers left behind wishbones before departing for the First World War, never to return and collect them. Many of the bar’s traditions remain intact, from the newspaper-covered walls to the plates of cheese and raw onions, the sawdust-covered floors to the tall-tales told by its bartenders.

McSorley’s is also home to deep, personal stories – including that of Geoffrey “Bart” Bartholomew, a career bartender of 45 years, and his son Rafe who grew up helping his dad at the landmark bar. Join Rafe to talk about his new book on the topic, where he explores McSorley’s bizarre rituals, bawdy humor, and eccentric tasks, including protecting decades-old dust on treasured artifacts and defending a 150-year-old space against the worst of Hurricane Sandy.

Free. Reservations required.
[This event is not accessible.]

Free
Loading...

Continue reading

From Bowery Boogie:

Breaking: ‘Cup & Saucer’ Ending Service on Monday After Decades on Canal Street

Posted on: July 12th, 2017 at 12:39 pm by

Say goodbye to that classic 1940s Coca-Cola sign at the corner of Eldridge and Canal Streets. Word on the block is that the fabled luncheonette, Cup & Saucer, is hanging it up. It’s closing shop after decades serving the neighborhood, thanks to a steep rent hike.

And there’s no time for you to process this information, either, as the last day of business is Monday.

Every few years, rumors surface detailing a demise that was continuously eluded. Especially after the building reportedly sold several years ago, creating much uncertainty whether the business would actually survive. Co-owner John Vasilopoulos told Metro in 2015 that he hoped the new owner would maintain the 5-year lease arrangement of the predecessor to keep afloat. Then there was the recent upstairs fire back in January, which no doubt threatened the operation. This time, however, it appears the talk is true. A tipster who frequents the establishment daily was informed by staff of the closure. Apparently, they started telling all the regular customers today.

We don’t really know what to say. The Cup & Saucer is a no-frills Lower East Side treasure that serves all strata of the community. “Giving the people of New York quality food, fast delivery, and great customer service,” as its website prominently touts. On any given morning, you find construction workers, commuters, travelers, and locals mingling at the countertop.

It’s been under the same ownership for nearly thirty years. Partners Nick Castanos (also a cook) and John Vasilopoulos took over the business in 1988, yet local lore suggests the corner kitchen dates back some 77 years. The duo also owns a diner in Ridgewood, Queens.

Our tipster surmises that the luncheonette also fell victim to the effects of failed development (i.e. the Canal Tower) and the encroaching Chinatown Bus situation that’s multiplying along Canal Street between Forsyth and Allen.


Visual Documentation of the distinguishing interior features of the now-bygone The Cup & Saucer Luncheonette (from Untapped Cities.com)

Iconic NYC Diner “The Cup & Saucer” Closing Down After Nearly 70 Years

Continue reading

From silive.com:

Schaffer’s Tavern: Winky says ‘it’s time’ for last call; sets closing date

Continue reading

New York Now Scavenger Hunt
Saturday, June 17, 2017
Check-in: 10:00 AM – 12:00 PM
Hunt: 10:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Closing Reception: 5:30 – 7:30 PM

Open House New York challenges you to show how much you know about New York’s recent past!

A lot has changed in New York City since the first Open House New York Weekend took place on October 11 and 12, 2003. From the High Line and Hudson Yards to Citibike and the Second Avenue Subway, the city and our experience of it has changed dramatically over the past fifteen years. 40,000 new buildings were built, 450 miles of new bike lanes were laid, and more than a third of New York’s neighborhoods were rezoned.

Through it all, Open House New York was there, opening doors and giving New Yorkers access to the changing city. Now Open House New York invites you to test your knowledge about this vibrant and volatile period in New York’s history! To celebrate the 15th anniversary of OHNY Weekend, Open House New York has organized a citywide scavenger hunt of recent architecture, planning, and development. Travel the five boroughs while answering clues that send you to New York’s most breathtaking new buildings. Relive some of the city’s most heated preservation battles and uncover the policies and politics that shaped contemporary New York. Join us in celebrating a city that remains the greatest metropolis in the world!

To learn more about how the hunt works, click here.

Closing Reception Hosted by

Registration
$35 per person. Advance registration is required, and early registration is encouraged as the number of participating teams is limited.

REGISTER TODAY

 

 

Continue reading

In the history of the hot dog and its Coney Island connection, Feltman’s preceded Nathan’s, and in a surprise turn of events, modern-day entrepreneurs have revived the brand after 63 years of dormancy, brought back a restaurant location to Surf Avenue (not sure if it is on or just near the original location), and have recreated a type of hot dog similar to what was served by Feltman’s back in the day.

From The Coney Island Blog:

…Feltman’s of Coney Island officially returns to it’s original location after 63 years by giving away 150 free hot dogs!  150 represents the years since German immigrant Charles Feltman invented the hot dog at Coney Island, NY.

A press conference will be taking place outside Luna Park at 11:45am. At 12pm the first 150 people on line will receive one free original hot dog courtesy of Feltman’s of Coney Island. By Memorial Day the Surf Ave location will be adorned with new signage inside and out. The new Surf Ave. location will be operating during the same hours as Luna Park. Valerio Ferrari President of C.A.I. and Luna Park says” we are thrilled to bring a part of Coney Island history to Luna Park as it’s the perfect fit.”

In 1867 Charles Feltman invented the hot dog at Coney Island. By the 1870’s Feltman’s Oceanside Pavilion was the largest restaurant in the world! In 1915 Nathan Handwerker was a bun slicer at Feltman’s Restaurant before opening his own hot dog spot down the block selling a tasty but smaller knockoff of Feltman’s original at half the price. Now you have the opportunity to enjoy the mother of all hot dogs! The original! Feltman’s of Coney Island hot dogs are all natural with an “Old World” German spice blend and no nitrates added in lamb casing. They have an incredible snap!

 

 

IMG_6079

Hot Dog inventor Charles Feltman

Feltman’s has a location at 80 St. Mark’s Place in the East Village. Feltman’s hot dogs are sold in Brooklyn at Brenman’s Meat Market and the Beach Deli both on Gerritsen Ave. In Queens at Deirdre Maeve’s Market in Breezy Point. Feltman’s hot dogs may be shipped across the country via the online store FeltmansofConeyIsland.com.

IMG_6260

@NY Post

Just last week Feltman’s hot dogs were added to the menu at Mc Sorley’s Old Ale House in Manhattan. The first time the historic tavern has altered the menu in over 50 years! Mikey’s Burgers on Ludlow St. on the Lower East Side also carries the iconic franks.

Feltman’s biggest fan is most likely eating Champ Kobayashi who can occasionally be found at Feltman’s Kitchen (East Village) at 80 St. Mark’s Place in the East Village scarfing down a Feltman’s original or an Al Capone Hot Dog named after the famous mobster who would frequently fill his belly at Feltman’s. Kobayashi said eating Feltman’s hot dogs is “as good as eating steak!”

So come celebrate Feltman’s long awaited return with a free hot dog as well as the 90th anniversary of the Cyclone Rollercoaster on Memorial Day.

Continue reading

Sat 05 2017 , by

Feltman’s Hotdogs?

A German immigrant named Charles Feltman, who ran a bakery on Coney Island supplied pies and other baked goods to the restaurants that opened up near the Coney Island Boardwalk in the period following the Civil War in the 19th century. In historical sources, Feltman has also been described as a butcher.

From Ephemeral New York: “A Coney Island pie maker invents the hot dog

“By the 1870s, small [sausage] stands were to be found along the beach, to the dismay of conventional restaurant owners who regarded them as unsanitary, fire hazards, and a competitive threat,” explains Savoring Gotham.

Feltman’s genius, the story goes, is that he pioneered the elongated bun that fit the frankfurter perfectly and made it the top-selling street food for hungry beachgoers.

Feltmansdininggardens

“Feltman and a wheelwright named Donovan conceived the idea of installing an oven in Feltman’s pie wagon, which enabled him to sell boiled sausages wrapped in pastry rolls up and down the beach,” wrote Michael Immerso in Coney Island: The People’s Playground.

Nathans1939andrewhermanmcnyAs Coney boomed, he replaced his cart with Feltman’s, a beer garden–like restaurant on Surf Avenue, selling his hot dogs for a dime a piece.

By the 1920s, Feltman was undercut. A former employee, Nathan Handwerker, opened his own hot dog stand a few blocks away and charged a nickel per dog.

Feltman’s survived until 1954. Nathan’s—like hot dogs all over the city—is still going strong.”

Save

Save

Save

Continue reading

From Curbed:

Harlem’s legendary Lenox Lounge is being demolished

The site is rumored to give way to a massive Sephora

Continue reading

Copyright © 2011-2017 Bygone NYC - All Rights Reserved