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Live-In Theater has come up with another interactive, participatory theater experience that is a dramatization based on real past events, in this case, the 1915 apprehension of 45-year-old Mary Mallon, called “Typhoid Mary” by the news media of the time. Reportedly, Mallon infected 51 people with Typhoid Fever, three of them died.

Alas, the one future performance of The Trial Of Typhoid Mary (Dec. 10th) on the online calendar of the Live-In Theater website is presently sold out, and no performances are (so far) scheduled for 2018.  However, your hope of seeing it may not be entirely lost. A stage manager told me that they do this production in “a lot of high schools” as well as “for private groups”. It has been around for a few years, and they performed it at The New York Historical Society in 2016.

Live-In Theater’s promotional materials for the show, “The Trial of Typhoid Mary” say, “Come give Typhoid Mary the trial she never received”. Ticketholders assemble (in this case, in the downstairs room of a Lower East Side bar), and a costumed re-enactor in solemn black who declared himself the judge set the scene, and chose various members of the audience to act the parts of jurors, bailiffs, and, at the performance I attended, a courtroom sketch artist. Another costumed re-enactor handed out golf pencils and notepads, and doubled as a “barker”. Though from the Colonial era to the mid-19th century, it was not unheard of for courts to be informally convened in taverns, (at least in Staten Island) by the end of the 19th century to the early 20th century (the time of Mary Mallon’s arrest for being a public health hazard), court proceedings had acquired a lot more formality and government control, not to mention proper courthouses. However, treatment of suspects under the premises of “innocent until proven guilty” had not advanced as much as it has now. I think the majority of the twenty- and thirty- something audience were properly horrified that Mallon had been arrested without a warrant, and some who questioned the actress who played Mallon on the stand clearly disapproved of the fact that she had not been read her rights (enforcement of this became a 1960s innovation), and had previously been summarily imprisoned on North Brother Island. Motivated perhaps by the role-playing of certain of the re-enactors, the suffragette who claimed to have been Mallon’s previous employer, who stressed that Mallon did not willfully infect others, and the one who played Mallon, who claimed to have nursed the family who got typhoid back to health, doing the more onerous duties, including washing soiled bedsheets, unlike in real life, they returned a verdict of innocent, though Mallon’s understanding of sanitary practices was to clean away all visible dirt, and she didn’t seem too concerned about whether she washed her hands “after she had been to the privy” if they were “not dirty”. All participants in this exercise had entered a time when “The Germ Theory of Disease” was as hotly debated and widely doubted as the phenomena of Global Warming is now, and with pretty much the same class divide between adherents.…

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From the Fraunces Tavern Museum website:

Washington’s Farewell

  • Google Calendar ICS
  • To commemorate Washington’s emotional farewell to his Officers that took place in the Long Room on December 4, 1783, a special reenactment of the farewell will occur throughout the day in the famous Long Room.

    This year we are thrilled to announce that actor Ian Kahn, who portrayed George Washington on the hit AMC series TURN,will be at the Museum to reprise his role and reenact the toast given by George Washington in Fraunces Tavern’s historic Long Room on December 4, 1783. Joining Ian to reenact the toast will be Dan Shippey, a George Washington reenactor and expert from the Breed’s Hill Institute who served as Ian’s mentor and inspiration during his time working on the show. Come and witness the toast, interact with “George,” and talk with Ian about his life-changing experience playing the General on TV.

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    Visitors will enjoy $1 admission for this exciting day of events; which will also include additional tours and activities throughout the day; such as a colonial costume photobooth, and hands-on family activities.

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From The Fraunces Tavern Museum website:

 

Presented by Robert Watson

Moored off the coast of Brooklyn until the end of the war, the derelict ship, the HMS Jersey, was a living hell for thousands of Americans either captured by the British or accused of disloyalty. Throughout the colonies, the mere mention of the ship sparked fear and loathing of British troops. Join Robert as he explores the long forgotten story of the bloodiest “battle” of the Revolution, when an old British prison ship claimed more American lives than were lost in combat during the entirety of the War and how the affair would help rally the cause and win the War.

Tickets for this event go on sale October 13*All attendees must purchase a ticket for Special Lectures. There is no reserved seating for this lecture. 

Tickets can be purchased online or at the door.
For tickets purchased online, you will receive a confirmation email from Fraunces Tavern Museum with further event details within 24 business hours.

Purchase Tickets:

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Buy tickets here

The World Premiere of America’s First Play: Androboros (Villain of the State)
Written by Governor Robert Hunter (1714) and Adapted by S.M. Dale (2017)

7:00pm performances on Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays in October

Before Hamilton, before Washington, before even much of Manhattan existed, there was Androboros! Mixing Elizabethan language with the commedia del arte of its day, this new adaptation will feature over a dozen original songs played live with a dancing, 10-member cast in an intimate setting. Based on a true incident that scandalized the young New York colony, the play is a great history lesson that is as funny and entertaining today as it was in 1714.

Peculiar Works Project Logo.jpg

This program is brought to you in partnership with
Peculiar Works Project.

 …

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From Jeremiah’s Vanishing New York:

Tuesday, October 10, 2017

The Noho Star & Temple Bar

VANISHING

On Lafayette Street since 1985, The Noho Star still has an old-school vibe that attracts low-key neighborhood people along with New York luminaries like Chuck Close, Wallace Shawn, and Lauren Hutton. The restaurant’s sister spot, Temple Bar, opened in 1989.

Now both are about to vanish.

The owners recently filed a Worker Adjustment and Retraining Notification (WARN) with the New York State Department of Labor, indicating plans to lay off Noho Star’s staff of 54 workers and close the restaurant on December 31.

Under “Reason for Dislocation,” it says “Economic.” The same listing is given for Temple Bar–all 13 employees laid off and the place closed December 31.

Noho Star and Temple Bar were both opened by George Schwarz, a 1930s German-Jewish emigre who began his New York restaurant empire in 1973 with Elephant and Castle in Greenwich Village, followed by One Fifth (since closed). He then acquired and revived the great Keens Chop House when it closed in 1978. From there, he and his artist wife, Kiki Kogelnik, opened Noho Star and Temple Bar. They also bought the building.

Schwarz died not a year ago, in December 2016. His friend Bonnie Jenkins, long-time manager of Keens, is Vice President of the closing restaurants. (Jenkins prefers not to comment on the closures at this time.)

There are no indications that the shutter is coming for Keens or Elephant and Castle.


Eggs Idaho

Only in the past few years did I finally find my way to Noho Star. In a neighborhood of dwindling options, it’s one of the last comfortable places to get a decent meal, i.e., a place that attracts a mixed-age crowd and doesn’t play loud music (or any music) while you eat. It’s a place where a person can dine alone, reading The Times (on paper) or The London Review of Books (as recently witnessed). It’s a place where you can think.

I will miss it.

from The Comments Section:

 

MKB said…

The Noho Star in turn replaced a dusty and old office supply store (where you could still buy V-Mail stationery as late as the Seventies) and NYC’s worst restaurant. That restaurant was so bad junkies and narcs (back in the day when a narc disguise was a serape and a wig) were the main customers. Why was I there? It was also the cheapest and right around the corner from my place on Mott.
I am so very sad that the Noho Star will be no more. Lots of memories.

October 10, 2017 at 4:30 PM

 …

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Battle of Prohibition Cocktails. NYC Top Cocktail Mixologists Face Off! Join the Party!

We’re taking over an entire lower east side hot spot Casa Mezcal for this party.

Location

86 Orchard St

Caza Mezcal

New York, NY 10002

View Map

Bring your best 1920s look! Dressing up is encouraged.

Last call to celebrate Summer and it’s your last chance to get in on the most epic summer event in New York City. For one last hurray to summer, we’re highlighting a must see event: a Speakeasy style bartender battle thrown by Postcard, your way to uncover NYC in a new way. It’s New York’s sizzling app that shows you all the hottest venues and events around you, live…

PLEASE NOTE: While it is a free event, and you don’t need to buy any tickets (you do need to rsvp), we are currently closing in on the exciting new version of Postcard app and would value your feedback.

Please note that you do need to have Free Postcard app installed to join in this event. This will be main part of your admission ticket, you will show postcard app on your phone. (you can install the app for free at itunes)

Here are the 2 steps you will need to do before the event:

For Iphone: Install postcard app (it’s free, get it here). Now just RSVP on Eventbrite, and you are ready for the party!

For Android: If you don’t have iphone, bring a friend (who needs to follow step 1) who does and you both get in! (make sure to rsvp either you or your friend)

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Which mixologist will make the better Prohibition cocktail?

Try them both and be the judge.

The Postcard app has been a leading source of all the best nightlife spots since their launch this July, and they’re sending off summer in style. Already the app has been used by top influencers, instagrammers, and even celebrities in NYC. If you haven’t tried it yet, you definitely should.

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“My friends and I like to go where the people are and the app always shows us exactly where to go to have the best night out”

– Tamara Zhukova, NYC Fashion Model (in the photo above)

The Prohibition era was full of fun and revelry, the roaring twenties, flapper girls, post war partying, and of course, secret drinking at speakeasies aka “juice joints”. So it’s not surprising that today’s cocktails get their heaviest influence from this era, and liquors like gin, rye, and scotch have made a comeback in a big way.

This event’s two featured liquors, gin and scotch, have a special Prohibition history behind them.

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Both were touted as industrial alcohols. Bootleggers with chemists on staff would strip away the denaturant (the dangerous stuff) in industrial high school lab ethanol, add colors and spices, and label it as premium European scotch or gin. Lucky for us, at this event we get to enjoy the real deal with all the fun, wild, and creative flavors that made these cocktails great!…

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From Spoiled NYC:

The Sound of Silence: A Tribute To Webster Hall

Subscribe to spoiled NYC’s official newsletter, The Stoop, for the best news, eats, drinks, places to go, and things to do.

For 131 years, Webster Hall has hosted some of the world’s biggest musical acts. Today it closes its doors– at least until it reopens under new ownership, sold in a deal worth an estimated $35 million.

The space, with a maximum capacity of 2,500 people, served as a nightclub, concert venue, corporate events space, and recording studio.

It will reopen in either 2019 or 2020 as the newly christened Spectrum Hall, its space restricted to concerts and sporting events.

I received the phone call in early May. A friend of mine told me management had served all Webster Hall employees with termination notices.

True, it had been a couple of years since I’d set foot in the venue, but a part of me heaved a pained sigh for yet another victim of the city’s changing landscape, for the many dances I’d shared with fellow miscreants who streamed into the place, their wrists ablaze with the shades of kandi bracelets and multi-colored fluffies.

I remembered the faces of the girls I kissed as vividly as I recalled those of the men I kissed– or shyly didn’t kiss. I recoiled at the memory of the crappy wage I made at the time, of the overpriced drinks, the even more overpriced water bottles, a precious commodity in a space that scorched with summer heat even in midwinter.

The people I met there ran the gamut, from frat bros with cockeyed grins, to scene kids with more gumption than me, roadsters who surveyed groups of three or more, code switching and peddling ketamine all the while.

Mirrored behavior existed on the far more spacious dance floor at Amazura Concert Hall in Queens or the even more cramped Electric Warehouse in Brooklyn, and the East Village had long given way to millennial kink, this host of music, bodies, motion, and silent exchanges in bathroom stalls.

“Webster had that old-time New York grunge that made you feel like you were part of the 19th century, in the sense that “fun” could easily involve trying to locate your stolen purse/phone,” says Michael Yates, formerly of Harlem and now living in Los Angeles.

“I’ll miss it. I’m sure the new version of the inside will look fantastic and modern and have a pleasant aroma. Old style Webster Hall was my first immersion into NYC’s EDM scene at the time. It was a place that was magical in the dark, probably because it would look awful when illuminated by sunlight.”

websterhall Having our friend @Halsey visit for an intimate show in the The Studio at Webster Hall tonight before we close for renovations in August. Stay tuned for more surprise shows leading up till then!

The venue, Yates continues, is a “perfect example” of New York City’s infrastructure.

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Don’t know how “Jazz Age” or Burlesque the actual performance is, but McKitterick Hotel is itself from a bygone era, and there’s the “1930s train car”. A Gilt City discount voucher for the current performances is available:

Activities & Events Chelsea
Whether you’re dining in the 1930s train car, on the twinkling rooftop garden, or jumping straight into the infamous “Sleep No More” performance, you’re sure to expect a night unlike any other.
About the performance:

Described as “thrilling, mind-bending… [u]nlike anything you’ve ever seen,” by the New York Post, “Sleep No More” has been delighting New York audiences since 2011. The interactive play, produced by Emursive and award-winning London theater company Punchdrunk, presents a loose adaptation of Shakespeare’s “Macbeth” through a film noir lens. Set at the fictional McKittrick Hotel (a former industrial space in West Chelsea), the experience begins in the Manderley Bar, where audience members are given masks and instructed to remain silent throughout the show. From there, they’re transported via elevator to one of the hotel’s five floors and let loose for the next few hours.

Wander through a cemetery, insane asylum and doctor’s office or follow an actor from scene to scene, taking in interpretive pantomime and dance sequences. Since you choose your own path through the story, your experience will be entirely unique. There’s no way of telling just what may happen.

What we love

  • Esteemed chefs Lee Hanson and Riad Nasr (Balthazar, Minetta Tavern) have taken over the McKittrick Hotel for the summer with the “Club Car,” a one-of-a-kind dining experience.
  • Seated inside a 1930s style train car-turned-restaurant, you’ll enjoy a surf-and-turf prix fixe menu that boasts flavors from old French and New York steakhouses with seafood inspirations from New Orleans.
  • Start off with doughy Parker House rolls and crudités before the main event of the dinner: a dry-age boneless rib-eye topped. The “surf” part of the meal changes daily and can range from scallops with romesco butter to soft shell crab.
  • Finish the decadent meal with a citrusy lemon chiffon cake or chocolate caramel tart and take in the dimly lit ambiance.

What to know

  • Redeem by Thu 08/31/17
  • Offer is final sale and non-refundable
  • Must be 21+ to consume alcohol; valid government ID required
  • Valid Thursday – Saturday
  • To view menu, please click here
  • Reservations are required and subject to availability; please book in advance of desired date
  • Gratuity is not included; we recommend tipping on the full value of service(s)
  • Tax is not included and will be charged upon redemption
  • Vouchers cannot be combined for multiple services
  • Offer cannot be combined with any other discounts or promotions
  • Voucher may be used to obtain the discount until August 31, 2017; after this date, the voucher is valid for the amount paid for five years from date of purchase, longer if provided by law
  • Photo credits: Jenny Anderson (Slides 1 and 4), DrielyS (Slide 2), Conor Harrigan (Slides 3 and 5) and Giafrese (Slide 6)

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Mon 07 2017 , by

Up On The Roof

From the blog of The Museum of the City of New York:

Up on the roof, entertainment en plein air

Spring in New York City is glorious.  Allergy issues aside, the season of rebirth is especially welcome after this winter’s polar vortex shenanigans.  And though I celebrate the sunny days and refreshing rain of spring, I can see the heat waves forming on the horizon.  Summer is coming and with it a suffocating wall of humidity.

One of my best strategies to beat the heat is going to the theater. Be it a movie, musical, or play,  the cool darkness of a theater combined with a few hours of entertainment is my preferred place to be on an unbearably hot day.  A hundred years ago, this wasn’t so much the case.  Without air conditioning, the heat of the lights and the crush of fellow audience members could make visiting the theater  intolerable.  Not wishing to lose business during the summer months, theater owners came up with a new strategy: the roof!

Byron Company (New York, N.Y.) [Roof Garden, Madison Square Garden Theatre.] ca. 1900.

Byron Company (New York, N.Y.) Roof Garden, Madison Square Garden Theatre. ca. 1900. Museum of the City of New York, 93.1.1.10866.

In the photograph above, a rooftop audience enjoys some light entertainment on the Madison Square Garden roof.  This MSG was located at 26th Street and Madison Avenue.  Designed by Stanford White, it was the second tallest building in the City at the time construction finished in 1890. Part of the fun for the audience was the chance to watch musical comedies and operettas from 32 stories off the ground. (Check out Mia’s early blog on the theater’s Diana statue.)

Further uptown at 44th and Broadway, the New York Theatre roof offered similar entertainment fare. The New York Theatre was originally built as the Olympia Theatre by  Oscar Hammerstein I (the grandfather of the Oscar Hammerstein from musical theater’s famous “Rodgers & Hammerstein”).

Byron Company (New York, N.Y.) Roof Garden, New York Theatre. ca. 1901. Museum of the City of New York. 93.1.1.10880.

Byron Company (New York, N.Y.) Roof Garden, New York Theatre. ca. 1901. Museum of the City of New York. 93.1.1.10880.

Though a financial failure for Hammerstein I, the theater was only the second to be built in what would become the Times Square Theater District.  In 1895, the area was known as Longacre Square.

Byron Company (New York, N.Y.) Roof Garden, New York Theatre. ca. 1901. Museum of the City of New York, 93.1.1.10877.

Byron Company (New York, N.Y.) Roof Garden, New York Theatre. ca. 1901. Museum of the City of New York, 93.1.1.10877.

Hammerstein I’s second effort at extravagant outdoor entertainment was the  Paradise Roof Garden at 201 West 42nd Street.  Part enclosed space and part open air, the Garden spanned the roofs of  the Victoria Theatre and the Theatre Republic next door.

Byron Company (New York, N.Y.). [Roof Garden, Paradise atop Hammerstein's Victoria.] ca. 1904.

Byron Company (New York, N.Y.). Roof Garden, Paradise atop Hammerstein’s Victoria.]ca. 1901. Museum of the City of New York, 93.1.1.10856.

The Paradise Roof Garden was run by Hammerstein I’s son Willie.  As the noise of an ever expanding New York drifted upward, the vaudeville shows presented on the roof adapted to include wordless routines and pantomime.

Byron Company (New York, N.Y.) [Roof Garden, Paradise atop Hammerstein's Victoria.] ca. 1904.

Byron Company (New York, N.Y.). Roof Garden, Paradise atop Hammerstein’s Victoria. ca.

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