Category:

Visual Documentation

from The Fraunces Tavern Museum website:

A 45-minute guided tour about Revolutionary spies such as Nathan Hale, Benjamin Tallmadge, and Lydia Darrah. Learn about the tools of the trade as a spymaster, the creation of America’s very first spy ring, and catch a glimpse of the last known letter from Nathan Hale which hasn’t been on display in over decade!

We offer guided Museum Tours to the public FREE with admission on the following days and times:

Thursdays @ 2pm
Fridays @ 2pm
Saturdays @ 1pm & 2pm

Sundays @ 1pm & 2pm

Saturdays in February @ 3pm – Fighting for Freedom Tour

There are NO guided tours on the following dates and times:

Sunday, February 11 @ 1pm
Sunday, February 18 @ 2pm
Saturday, February 24 @ 2pm

*No reservations are required. Please plan your arrival accordingly, as space is limited.

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January 20 – March 3, 2018

New York, NY – WESTWOOD GALLERY NYC presents a premiere New York City exhibition of photographs by Bob Adelman and curated by James Cavello. The exhibition highlights forty photographs of four influential artists who changed 20th century art, whom Adelman began photographing in the 1960s: Andy Warhol, Roy Lichtenstein, James Rosenquist and Tom Wesselmann. This is the first New York exhibition of the photographs, in keeping with the gallery program of focusing on undiscovered bodies of work. The Estate of Mr. Adelman includes a very limited selection of signed prints, and the gallery is pleased to provide this exclusive opportunity for collectors.

Bob Adelman was compelled to photograph New York artists in the 1960s when he became interested in understanding the inner workings of the creative mind. The photographs on view provide an intimate, sometimes playful view of legendary artists and Adelman’s own ingenious sense in capturing their persona in the studio. They include scenes from Andy Warhol’s daily life at the Factory: Warhol on the infamous red couch, shopping at a nearby Gristedes for Brillo Boxes and Campbell Soup cans, socializing with his glamorous inner-circle at parties, filming, and posing with his flower paintings as well as the ‘The American Man’ suite. The photographs of Roy Lichtenstein span several decades and document the artist in his studio with his paintings and completing his iconic murals, such as: the fleeting 1963 “Greene Street Mural,” the permanent 1989 “Tel Aviv Museum of Art Mural,” and the collage for “Times Square Mural”. James Rosenquist is documented with his paintings and murals, showing a completed “Big Bo” and the stages toward his 1980 “Star Thief” mural. Rosenquist is also captured in an iconic image: looking through a magnifying glass into Adelman’s camera. The photographs of Tom Wesselmann in 1966 portray his early years which illustrate the beginning of his career-defining artwork in his first studio at 54 Bond Street, as well as in Sidney Janis Gallery. Other photos of Wesselmann, 20 years later, depict the artist holding a steel-cut nude outline of his long-time model and studio assistant, Monica Serra, in 1988 at his later studio at 231 Bowery.

Photographs © Bob Adelman Estate

During Adelman’s time in New York, his portfolio matured to document over fifty years of prominent and pioneering New York artists. This vast archive includes photographs of Larry Rivers, Donald Judd, Jasper Johns, Marisol Escobar, Red Grooms, Jeff Koons, Adolph Gottlieb, Barnett Newman, Robert Rauschenberg, Dick Bellamy, Lucas Samaras, Jim Dine, David Hockney as well as influential art dealers who shifted the perception of how to sell art, such as Leo Castelli.

As his friend and mentor Ralph Ellison stated, “Adelman has moved beyond the familiar clichés of most documentary photography into that rare sphere wherein technical ability and social vision combine to create a work of art.”

An internationally-recognized photojournalist, Bob Adelman worked for LIFE, The New York Times Magazine, Newsweek, TIME, Esquire, Vanity Fair, London’s Sunday Times Magazine, Paris Match, and other major publications.

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Friday
Jan 19
Greenwich Village
New Yorkers have a tendency to romanticize bygone eras of city history: the jazzy ’20s; the gritty ’70s; or even the simpler times of the early 2010s. This weekend, the New Ohio Theatre on Christopher Street will re-create an iconic slab of ’60s infamy — the artist-haunted Chelsea Hotel. There will be cheap drinks, old tunes, and photographers shooting on film, all meant to evoke the infamous hotel. We suggest you read Patti Smith’s Just Kids to prepare.
Cost: $20 suggested donation at the door.

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Mod New York New York Fashion Takes A Trip

From Rizzoli Books: https://www.rizzolibookstore.com/news/mod-new-york-1

Conversation, reception, and book-signing, with Phyllis Madgidson, Donald Albrect, and Caroline Reynnolds Milbank

According to the skint e-mail newsletter, attending while dressed in the Mod style of Twiggy is encouraged, but not required.

Store Location and Hours

 

    • 1133 Broadway
      between 25th and 26th Street
      New York, NY 10010
      (map)
    • (800) 52-BOOKS – Toll Free
      (212) 759-2424 – Telephone
    • Monday–Friday: 10:30–8:00
      Saturday: 12:00-8:00
      Sunday: 11:00–7:00

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from Lost City:

04 September 2012

Lascoff Drugs Closes After a 113 Years

I thought upper Lexington Avenue had a special force field surrounding it (i.e.—influential rich people) that allowed an inordinate number of old businesses to survive. But, alas, I was wrong. If the bluebloods couldn’t save the iconic Upper East Side pharmacy Lascoff Drugs, what can they save?
Lascoff closed last July after 113 years in business. I don’t know how I missed that. I guess lately I’ve unconsciously learned to avert my eyes when beautiful landmarks shutter. I just can’t bear the pain.
Lascoff, along with Bigelow and one or two others, was one of New York’s great, classic pharmacies. It opened in 1899, when McKinley was President, and was the first licensed pharmacy in New York State, according to the New York Times. It was a store so majestic and solemn, you felt like you were entering a church when you went in. High ceilings, high shelving, a balcony, ancient Pharmacuetical relics, and silence. No music. You could find many old and classic brands there that you couldn’t locate elsewhere. And the vertical sign on the corner building was one of the grandest in the city.
The enterprise was founded by J. Leon Lascoff. He was born in Vilna, then in Russian Poland, and came to New York in 1892. His first drug store was at Lex and 83rd. He then moved across the street and then, in 1931, moved to 82nd and Lex—Lascoff’s final location. He died in 1936. His son Frederick took over the business and ran it until his death in 1970. During Fred’s time, the store had a reputation for odd cures. It sold leeches to boxers and catnip oil to lion hunters. He once sold a mixture of phenol, valerian, asafetida and iodoform to a colleague who had complained that his own pharmacy didn’t smell enough like a drug store.
After Frederick died, the business fell out of the family. It was purchased by Phil and Susan Ragusa. I assume they were still running it when it closed.

2 comments:

upstate johnny g said…

Aaarrrgggghhhhhh!!!!!!!! Another icon, another living link to the past, another glorious example of how time travel is almost possible, is closed. My girlfriend and I popped by Lascoff one morning this past summer and even though it was a weekday, they were closed. We didn’t quite get it, because we’d been there before and business seemed healthy enough. Brooks, we have you to thank for turning us on to Lascoff’s in the first place with your great posting about that neighborhood. We would go to Lascoff’s and then pop over to the Lexington Candy Shop to have a real burger and a Coke made with actual Coke syrup and carbonated water, mixed with a spoon by the fountain guy. Your Yorkville guide opened all of this up to us. Thanks.

Do you have any idea what will become of Lascoff’s?

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From Walter Grutchfield.net:

FThe J. M. Horton Ice Cream Company
back  The J. M. Horton Ice Cream Company, 302 Columbus Ave. New York, 2009   next
The J. M. Horton
Ice Cream Company
In 1860 James M. Horton was listed in Trow’s New York City Directory as an agent for the Orange County Milk Association.

In the 1861 New York city directory this ad for the Orange County Milk Association listed James M. Horton as president of the company. It also says that the company was organized in 1842 and incorporated 1 May 1860.

By 1873 James M. Horton was listed at 305 Fourth Ave., 1264 Broadway and 77 Chatham St., New York City. These, apparently, were the earliest locations of the J. M. Horton Ice Cream Co.

305 Fourth Ave.and 1264 Broadway are on this Horton’s Ice Cream ad from 1877.

305 Fourth Ave. and 75 Chatham St. are also on this Horton’s Ice Cream ad from 1879. 305 Fourth Ave. remained a Horton address from 1873 through 1914.

302 Columbus Ave. first appeared in directories in 1892 and remained a Horton location through 1922.

An F.Y.I. article in the New York Times, 19 March 2000, by Daniel B. Schneider, had this to say regarding 302 Columbus Ave., “At the turn of the 19th century, when the building at 302 Columbus was erected, the Horton company was supplying over half of New York City’s ice cream, but like other small local producers it was ultimately unable to compete with larger, more mechanized operations and by 1930 was absorbed by the Pioneer Ice Cream Division of Borden. Most building construction on Columbus Avenue followed the arrival of the Ninth Avenue el in 1881, and the fancy pediments on many former factory buildings were originally intended as rooftop advertisements, to be seen by riders on the trains passing overhead but all but invisible from the sidewalk below.”

The founder of the J. M. Horton Ice Cream Company was James Madison Horton (1835-1914). His obituary in the New York Times, 27 June 1914, read, “James Madison Horton, the well-known ice cream manufacturer, died yesterday at his home, 112 West 126th Street, at the age of 79. Mr. Horton was born on a farm near Middletown, N. Y., and in 1853 came to this city with his brother to engage in the milk business. From 1858 to 1869 he was President of the Orange County Milk Association and in 1870 first started in the ice cream business. He bought out a small business and reorganized it under the name of J. M. Horton & Co. In 1873 the firm was again reorganized, this time becoming the J. M. Horton Ice Cream Company, with a nominal capital of $40,000, and Mr. Horton became its President and chief stockholder. From this later start the business grew until today there are six stores and distributing centres in this city and several in Brooklyn. Mr. Horton was largely interested in real estate. In 1912 he transferred eleven pieces of property to his children, James M.…

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Wednesday, December 20, 2017, 6:30 p.m.

Program Locations:

Fully accessible to wheelchairs
Program is free, but advance registration is recommended. Priority will be given to those who have registered in advance.
REGISTER

The oldest building in New York City, the hobbit doors of Dennet Place, a hidden museum in a Williamsburg apartment—Brooklyn is filled with secrets.

Secret Brooklyn book coverAway from the crowds and standard attractions, Brooklyn offers countless offbeat experiences. Michelle Young and Augustin Pasquet, founders of the online magazine Untapped Cities, join us for a conversation their book Secret Brooklyn: An Usual Guide.

After presenting an overview of the borough’s hidden treasures, the authors will discuss their popular website and the power of urban discovery. A Q&A follows.

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At Museum of the City of New York

1220 Fifth Ave at 103rd St., Open Daily 10am–6pm

Back to Exhibitions

From frozen ponds to Madison Square Garden, ice-skating has become a quintessentially New York pastime, woven into the city’s urban fabric in ways large and small.

New York on Ice: Skating in the City invites visitors to explore how ice-skating evolved in the city from its colonial Dutch and British origins to become a 19th-century craze, and later an opportunity for elaborate spectacle, commercialized leisure, and competitive sport in the 20th century and beyond. Along the way, skating has left its mark on New York’s urban landscape, from the design of Central Park, to intimate hotel rinks and extravagant arenas, to a plethora of skating facilities that today define and transform parks and other public spaces across the city.

The story of New York on Ice will be told through vintage photographs, posters, lithographs, paintings, and costumes. Together they reveal the evolution of the sport and art of ice-skating in the city both as a window into a passion and pastime of generations of New Yorkers, and as an unexpected ingredient of urban place-making.

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NY Adventure Club Presents: New Year’s Eve Speakeasy @ Civic Club Mansion

Don your flapper dress or three-piece tux and ring in the New Year inside a century-old mansion usually closed to the public, until now.

Join New York Adventure Club as we step back in time for an intimate, prohibition-era celebration inside a private mansion — originally built in 1899 for the Civic Club (which was dedicated to reducing poverty and gambling in the neighborhood), the house is now owned and operated by the New York Estonian Educational Society, which acts as the main center of Estonian culture on the U.S. Eastern seaboard

Once you relay the secret password at the entrance, you will enter into a highbrow affair and be treated to:

 

  • A host of interactive antique decor and props such as antique radios, Edison cylinders, stereoscopes (with prohibition-themed slides), and original prohibition prescriptions
  • Opportunities to purchase food and drinks from the house’s full restaurant and bar
  • Parlor games from the time period, including billiards and foosball
  • A champagne toast at midnight, which Volstead Act agents would have tried break up had they caught wind of it
  • Your ticket to this unique gathering includes entry into the private gilded age mansion, interactive opportunities with tons of authentic antiques from nearly a century ago, parlor games, and a glass of champagne to ring in the New Year.

     

    Flapper dress / black tie optional.

    See you there!

     


     

    Disclaimer

    Must be 21 or older.

    ID will be checked at door.

    By attending a New York Adventure Club experience, you accept our terms of service.

    Categories: Hidden Spots, Food, Historic Sites, Social

    58 tickets available

    $30

    Sunday, Dec 31
    9:30 PM – 1 AM

    New York

    Estonian House

    243 East 34th Street

    New York, NY 10016

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December 15th: Winter Myths
Join us for a journey into the underworld of holiday lore and celestial solstice diversions! Victoria Flexner of Edible History will unveil the pagan roots of today’s seasonal traditions, followed by an astrological forecast for 2018 with astrologer Alice Sparkly Kat. Grab a cup from the cauldron of mulled wine and join in an introductory lesson on cult card game Magic: The Gathering, or browse the richly illustrated 19th-century McLoughlin Brothers children’s tales on view from the BHS collection. It’s the antidote to the holiday party circuit you’ve been waiting for, though tacky holiday sweaters are encouraged!

To learn more about the McLoughlin Brothers publishing firm and their vibrant picture books, visit the exhibition Radiant with Color & Art: McLoughlin Brothers and the Business of Picture Books, 1858-1920, on view now at The Grolier Club.

The Evening’s Schedule

5:00 pm – 9:00 pm A Magical Gathering
Test your might and the strength of your sorcery with a game of Magic: The Gathering! Tutorials available from local expert Peter Rawlings at 5:30 & 7:45.
Beginning at 5:45 pm Winter’s Tales
 Dig in to the BHS Archives for wintery folklore and stories from our collection of McLoughlin Brothers picture books. Stories of Santa Claus and other folk heroes come to life in vivid illustrations on these pages!
6:15 pm – 7:00 pm Winter Solstice & The Old Religion
Why did people choose some of the harshest months of the year as the focal point of their community holiday observations? Victoria Flexner of Edible History unveils and revisits some of the ancient &  Pagan roots of today’s holiday traditions.
7:15 pm – 8:00 pm What’s Going On?: An Astrological Analysis of Our Contemporary Climate
Astrologer Alice Sparkly Kat will talk about what will happen astrologically in 2018 in order to frame the near future as a segment of longer cycles. The intention of the discussion is to lead to an understanding of astrology as a tool for looking at time in a socially conscious way.
8:15 pm – 8:45 pm Folks, It’s Cold Outside
Warm up the ancient way: with a sample of cozy and spicy mulled wine! Enjoy a warm drink before heading home.

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