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1817

From pulsd.com:
DETAILS

Ring in the new year at Mr. Cannon, the most infamous bar in the Seaport District, offering inventive cocktails and speakeasy vibes. The fun starts at 9:00pm on Sunday December 31, 2017.

Grab this $89 Ticket (a $118 value) and get ready to enjoy throwback cocktails from years gone by as you wrap-up 2017.

Your 3 Hour Premium Open Bar also includes passed foods; from the Baby Lamb Chops with Spearmint Jam and Tzatziki Sauce to the Vegetable Spring Rolls with Ponzu Sauce, you certainly won’t be going hungry as you are getting merry.

Whether you come for the cozy vibes or the sleep cocktails, counting down to midnight at such an exclusive spot means that you’ll be welcoming 2018 in an only-in-New York fashion…

LOCATION
Mr. Cannon
206 Front Street
MERCHANT

Nestled in downtown Manhattan’s Seaport District, right off the city’s idyllic cobblestone streets, Mr. Cannon is a speakeasy that traces it’s roots back to 1817.

Enter through the hidden entrance and you’ll be transported to a subterranean lounge from years gone by. This bespoke social club unites the present and past with old-school sensibilities and aesthetics.

Celebrate the turn of the year at this intimate venue with endless drinks and delicious food including the Peppercorn Encrusted Beef Tenderloin with Horseradish Crema & Micro Arugula and Citrus Marinated Shrimp with Dill and Mango.

Have a few more drinks and it may loosen your lips; but until then, you’ll be welcoming 2018 from New York City’s best kept secret…

Your $89 Ticket (an $118 Value) Includes:

  • Admission to the A Speakeasy New Year’s Eve Party at Mr. Cannon from 9:00pm until 2:00am on Sunday December 31, 2017.
  • 3 Hour Open Bar from 9:00pm until 12:00am.
  • Passed foods including Baby Lamb Chops with Spearmint Jam & Tzatziki Sauce, Vegetable Spring Rolls with Ponzu Sauce & more.
  • Countdown to the Ball Drop.
  • Midnight Champagne Toast.
  • Party Favors.

Mr Cannon’s Website | A Speakeasy NYE

THE FINE PRINT
  • May purchase as many tickets as you like for personal use or for gifting.
  • Event runs 9pm-2am; Premium Open Bar run from 9pm-12am.
  • Valid only on Sunday December 31, 2017.

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from Ephemeral New York:

The Thanksgiving ragamuffins of old New York

November 23, 2015

It’s one of the strangest holiday traditions in late 19th and early 20th century New York City.

Ragamuffins1915bain

On Thanksgiving day, kids (and often adults as well) used to dress up in costume (cowboys, pirates, and princesses were big) or in their most threadbare clothes and go door to door in the neighborhood, asking, anything for Thanksgiving?

How the tradition started isn’t all that clear. Though New Yorkers had been celebrating Thanksgiving as an official holiday since 1817, it was only nationalized in 1864.

Ragamuffinsbrooklyneagle1902

Somehow, a day to feast on turkey (and later watch football games) became associated with a practice that was part Mardi Gras, part modern-day Halloween.

These ragamuffins, as the kids were called, charmed (and sometimes irritated) New Yorkers; they begged for nickels and pennies and played jokes.

RagamuffinsNYPL1933

In some areas, these “masqueraders” even won prizes for the best getup.

“In the old days,” a policeman recalled in a New York Times article from 1930, “the Hudson Dusters, and the Rangers and the Blue Shirts used to get all dressed up and their girls did, too, and they’d have prizes for the best costume and they’d come uptown for the parade, with horns and bells. And they’d get free drinks in the saloons.”

Ragamuffinsnypl19332

Of course, this old-school tradition couldn’t last. In the 1930s, the schools superintendent discouraged the tradition. Soon, only kids who lived in neighborhoods where the “subway lines end,” as the Times put it, continued to dress up, beg, and play pranks.

Ragamuffinsbain1911

As another policeman the Times spoke to in 1947 remarked, “I remember the fun we had when we used to go out all dressed up for Thanksgiving and the people dropped red pennies out the window.” (Red because they were heated on the stove, intended to burn little kid hands.)

“But they don’t have any real fun like that anymore,” he added.

[Photos: LOC; Brooklyn Daily Eagle; NYPL Digital Collection; NYPL Digital Collection; LOC]

This tradition is shown in a modified form in the novel A Tree Grows In Brooklyn: the children, who ordinarily run errands and shop, do this type of thanksgiving treat begging from the local merchants, who, for this purpose, give away broken candy and other things they could not sell.

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