Tags:

1950s

From Flushing Town Hall:

Taking it to the Streets: 1950s NY through the Lens of Flushing Photographer Frank Oscar Larson

June 25th, 2017 – August 6th, 2017

Taking it to the Streets: 1950s NY through the Lens of Flushing Photographer Frank Oscar Larson

tickets

Before cell phones documented nearly every aspect of daily life, street photographers captured the humble, the mundane, and the ordinary. Flushing resident Frank Larson documented New York in the 1950s. When we view Larson’s work 60 years later, we still see ourselves, even if New York has changed around us.

Opening Reception: SUN, JUNE 25, 1-3 PM Lecture: WED, JUNE 28, 6-8 PM

 

Photography Tour & Lesson: SUN, JULY 9 & 16, 2 PM (more info here)

 

Gallery Dates: SUN, JUNE 25 – SUN, AUG 6

 

Gallery Hours: SAT & SUN, 12-5 PM

 

 

$5 Suggested Donation/FREE for Members & Students 

Continue reading

From The New York Times:
Love and Black Lives, in Pictures Found on a Brooklyn Street
A discarded photo album reveals a rich history of black lives, from the
segregated South to Harlem dance halls to a pretty block in Crown Heights.
By ANNIE CORREAL
JAN. 27, 2017

One night six years ago, on a quiet side street in Crown Heights, Brooklyn, I came across a photo album that had been put out with the trash. I lived around the corner, and I was walking home when I saw it sitting beneath a streetlamp on Lincoln Place.
It looked handmade, with a wooden cover bound with a shoelace. But it had been tied up with twine, like a bunch of old newspapers, and left atop a pile of recycling.
After hesitating a moment, I picked it up and took it home.
The pages were fragile, and they cracked when I turned them, as if the album hadn’t been opened in a long time, but the photos were perfectly preserved. They seemed to chronicle the life of a black couple at midcentury: a beautiful woman with a big smile and a man who looked serious, or was maybe just camera-shy, and had served in World War II.
As I turned the pages, the scenery changed from country picnics to city streets and crowded dance halls in what appeared to be Harlem, and the couple went from youth to middle age. Looking at the album, I was struck by how joyful the photos were — and by the fact that as fabled as this era was, I had never seen a black family’s own account of that time.
I wondered who these neighbors were, and who had thrown the album out.
For decades, this part of Crown Heights had been mostly black. When I arrived in the neighborhood, several years before, I was one of the few nonblack residents on the block. The neighborhood was changing, though; newcomers were arriving and longtime residents were moving out.
I went back to Lincoln Place, hoping to find the album’s owner; it had surely been thrown out by mistake. Lincoln Place was the very image of old Brooklyn promoted by real estate agents. On other blocks, the houses were carved up or crumbling. Or they had been torn down and replaced by big buildings with spotlights and no-loitering signs. But on Lincoln Place, the stately rowhouses were still intact and well loved. The block was preserved in amber.
I knocked on doors and left my number, but I never heard from anyone. So I put the album on my bookshelf. A few years later, my landlords got an offer they couldn’t refuse, and my short time in Crown Heights was up. I stumbled upon the album while packing and pulled it off the shelf. Now I really had to reckon with it.
Gentrification was transforming the neighborhood — soon there might be no one left who recognized the world in these pictures. And the album was literally falling apart in my hands.…

Continue reading

Back Inside the Long-Shuttered Allen Mall Bathhouse [PHOTOS]

Posted on: May 27th, 2016 at 5:12 am by

allen-bathhouse-asbestos-6

The long-vacant Allen Mall Bathhouse is getting a deep scrub-down. As previously reported, the Parks Department last week commenced asbestos abatement activity with the purpose of returning the decades-old facility to community use. Namely, a “comfort station” that offers an affordable food stand and (possibly) bike repair station.

Due to the ongoing work, we now have another glimpse inside former Second Avenue El bathroom, which hasn’t been used since the 1950s.

allen-bathhouse-asbestos-2

The cleanup effort should last until around June 20, at which point, the city is poised to issue a Request for Proposals to convert the facility. Community Board 3 backed the plan in March, albeit with several recommendations:

  • That the food vendor be “accessible” to the community.
  • The addition of a bicycle servicing station.
  • Widening of the median concrete and landscaping to resemble the Mall south of Delancey (potential to affect the protected bike lanes).
  • Outdoor seating in warmer months on the northern exposure of the bathhouse.
  • Preference that the building remain preserved.
  • Assurance that the public bathroom on the south side is properly maintained by the vendor partners.

Millions in funding is necessary to see this to conclusion. As it stands, there’s currently $2 million in the bank earmarked for the renovation project, both from Parks and the now-defunct Lower Manhattan Development Corp. respectively. Plus, an additional $2.2 million (or thereabouts) is reportedly needed to complete the project, which would concurrently fix roughly two-thirds of the stretch between Delancey and Rivington. (The potential partner would be responsible for the building rehabilitation.)

Save

Save

Continue reading

Photo flashback: Whatever happened to Honeywood, Staten Island?

By Carol Ann Benanti
on June 26, 2016 at 12:23 PM

from SiLive.com: http://www.silive.com/timecapsule/2016/06/whatever_happened_to_honeywood_community_on_staten_island.html#incart_river_home

STATEN ISLAND, N.Y. — Great Kills is the South Shore’s northernmost community, according to many local geographers. Also tagged Staten Island’s largest neighborhood, it is bordered by Richmond Town to the north, Oakwood to the east, Eltingville to the west, and the Great Kills Harbor to the south.

Interestingly, Kil, is an archaic Dutch word with various popular translations, including “creek” and “channel,” inasmuch as many small streams dot the neighborhood —  and the name can be interpreted as meaning that a great number of such streams can be found there.

Once a mecca for fishermen and noted for the fine seafood served in its hotels, the shoreline was called Cairedon and the inland was known as Newtown.

The area was later named Gifford’s (as in Giffords Lane, which bisects the community), after the local commissioner and surveyor of roads, Daniel Gifford. The name, derived from the above-mentioned Dutch word kil (creek), was adopted in 1865.

Another name associated with the neighborhood is Honeywood, which survived as the name of the telephone exchange for many South Shore communities through the late 1950s.

Today, Great Kills is home to a thriving marina and is part of the expansive Gateway National Recreation Area.

The neighborhood is represented in the New York City Council by Joe Borelli.

It’s Poillon-Seguine-Britton House was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1984.

The neighborhood is home to Great Kills Little League, one of the eight little leagues on Staten Island.

Actor Rick Schroder lived in the community as a child, as did actress Alyssa Milano, comedian Bob Levy and new ESPN anchor Joe Engle.

At the southeastern corner of the neighborhood is Great Kills Park, a national park site that is part of Gateway National Recreation Area. The park includes a beach, marina, trails, fishing and bird-watching areas and sports fields.

Sadly, the area suffers from a heroin and prescription drug problem and is sometimes referred to as “the drug capital of Staten Island.”

FDNY Engine Company 162/Ladder Company 82 and Battalion 23, serve Great Kills from quarters on Nelson Ave and Barnes Intermediate School is one of Staten Island’s middle schools. Firefighter Scott Davidson, lost in the 9-11 attacks, attended Barnes.

Myra Barnes Intermediate School was named after an educator and civic activist, also known as “The Fighting Lady of New Dorp.” Barnes was well known for her contributions to the New York City Council.…

Continue reading

from Creative Boom: Photographs of everyday life in 1950s New York City discovered in an attic 45 years later

“The vintage photographs you’re about to see have an interesting history. They all came from a cardboard box filled with negatives that was unopened and virtually forgotten for over 45 years. When undiscovered photographer Frank Larson passed away in 1964, his wife Eleanora boxed up all of their possessions and moved out of their retirement home in Lakeville, Connecticut. The box of negatives was one of these items, and it has remained with the family ever since, tucked away in storage.

That was until, Carole Larson – the widow of Frank’s youngest son David – and her son Soren were sorting though old boxes in their attic and found the negatives.

Soren said: “I had seen a few examples of my grandfather’s photography over the years and always admired them – our old family photo albums have a few small prints of his work in them. My father also used to speak with admiration about his father’s love of photography and his weekend trips with his Rolleiflex into the city to film places like the Bowery, Chinatown and Times Square.

“But when I opened the box and began to explore what was inside I was truly shocked at the quality and range of the images, as well as the effort, dedication and love he brought to the task. When Frank died in 1964, I was only three years old, and too young to remember this gentle, careful man.”

Inside the box were over 100 envelopes filled with mostly medium-format, 2 1/4″ x 2 1/4″ negatives. The packets were marked by date and location, carefully sealed and left exactly as he packed them 50 years ago. Soren added: “As I began unsealing each packet and holding the negatives up to the light, it was like a trip back in time, back to the New York of the early ’50s.”

Following the discovering, Soren built a website in dedication to his grandfather, sharing the negatives-turned-photographs with the rest of the world. You can view more of Frank Larson’s amazing photography at www.franklarsonphotos.com. “…

Continue reading

from Eater.com: Classic Chelsea Luncheonette La Taza De Oro Is Closed for Good

by
“After nearly nine months in the dark, the owner of classic Chelsea greasy spoon La Taza de Oro has decided not to reopen the restaurant. The luncheonette’s troubles started last spring when Con Ed turned off the gas and the DOB issued a vacate order after a few bricks fell from a neighboring building. The restaurant’s proprietor, Eric Montalvo, also owns the building, but after losing nine months of income, he made the decision to close it for good. As Jeremiah Moss notes, he’s retiring and his kids don’t want to run the business.”

… “Last year, Robert Sietsema put La Taza D’Oro on his list of “irreplaceable dining institutions.”  Eater’s critic noted: “This 1950s Puerto Rican lunch counter, perfectly intact in every detail including formica counter and menu rotating in weekly cycles, is supremely redolent of Chelsea’s Latin past.”

A comment writer on Jeremiah’s Vanishing NY said: “This is, of course, punishingly sad. The neighborhood has lost Sucelt on 14th and 7th, and Cabo Rojo on 10th Avenue and 24th, and now Taza. I took my kids there every week. And what of all the jobs lost? Luis, Lucie, Reve, and so many others. And the impromptu art exhibitions on the walls. I saw Mr. Montalvo there a few weeks ago and, having noticed that he was painting the restored cornice yellow and red (like the rice and beans within!) I asked him when he was reopening and he said he was retiring. It is a miserable state of affairs, and so the last of the rice and beans joints vanishes into the ether. We will all miss La Taza de Oro. ” Another said, “Business by business, New York’s individuality and diversity is being erased. And there doesn’t seem to be anyone in a position of power who seriously wants to or is trying to halt this transformation. Not one. ”

 …

Continue reading

from the NYC MTA: MTA New York City Transit, NY Transit Museum Ring in Holidays with Vintage Buses, Subways

Vintage Train

MTA New York City Transit and the New York Transit Museum are putting extra magic on the tracks with the Metropolitan Transportation Authority’s annual holiday tradition of rides to the past via its vintage fleet of buses and subway trains – and the chance for transit fans to buy museum merchandise at a special station pop-up shop.

The holiday nostalgia fleet includes subway cars from the 1930s and buses from the late 1940s to the 1980s. The New York Transit Museum typically displays these vehicles during special events at the museum or around the city, but are offering these holiday nostalgia rides to the public for a limited time with the swipe of a MetroCard. Some vintage buses also will be on display at Union Square, Herald Square and at the Circle Line Terminal.

For four consecutive Sundays in December, subway customers can catch the “Shoppers Special,” a train consisting of eight cars from the 1930s that ran along the lettered lines until the late 1970s. The cars, which were ordered for the Independent Subway System (IND), were the first subway cars to be identified by their contract numbers, hence the R1/9 designations. R1/9 cars, known as ““City-Cars,” have rattan seats, ceiling fans, incandescent light bulbs, and roll signs for passenger information. Their design of more doors that were also wider and faster, plus increased standing capacity to accommodate crowds, served as the model of modern subway cars, and their dimensions are identical to the latest R160 cars. They were retired from service in 1977.

“For all intents and purposes, this was the first modern subway car and today’s subway fleets owe a lot to the design,” said Joe Leader, Senior Vice President of Subways. “They were basic, durable and offered the expected levels of customer comfort for decades after they were introduced into service. We continue to build upon this strong foundation with each new car design.”

The “Shoppers Special” will run from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on December 6, 13, 20, and 27, making local stops on the 6 Av Line from Queens Plaza to 2 Av. The first run of the day departs from 2 Av, where a special museum pop-up shop will be open every Sunday during the holiday nostalgia rides.

MTA NYC Transit is also putting a fleet of vintage buses on the M42 route for weekday daytime service between November 30 and December 18. The buses, which will operate between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., will only be available weather permitting. The vintage fleet will not operate in rainy, snowy or icy conditions.

This year’s holiday nostalgia buses were manufactured by General Motors, Mack and Flexible, three major firms that no longer manufacture buses.

“Seeing these vintage buses in service again is always a nostalgic event for many New Yorkers. My father and I drove some of these buses, which makes this an especially personal event for me,” said Darryl Irick, President of MTA Bus Company and Senior Vice President New York City Transit Department of Buses.

Continue reading

Link to slideshow of past historic Daily News photos and headlines below shared from the NY Daily News depicts events surrounding the enactment of Prohibition and the celebration of Repeal as they affected New York City. While I knew the late Mayor Jimmy Walker has been no fan of Prohibition (and that enforcement was lax, and he himself was said to have frequented speakeasies), I had no idea that there had been a Beer Parade through city streets, with floats urging that beer be re-legalized and taxed to get the economy out of a slump. Talk about history repeating itself!

http://nydn.us/http://nydn.us/1fcz6PD

Continue reading

VINTAGE BUS BASH ON GOVERNORS ISLAND

Saturday July 11 & Sunday July 12
11am – 4pm
Free

Four of the Transit Museum’s vintage buses are headed to Governors Island for a summer getaway! Our Vintage Bus Bash will transport visitors back to the 1940s and 1950s. Come see iconic “fishbowl” windows, the first air-conditioned bus in the country, the bus model that Jackie Gleason drove in his role on The Honeymooners, and more. No bus fare needed – this event is free!…

Continue reading

Copyright © 2011-2017 Bygone NYC - All Rights Reserved