Tags:

1964

From The North Shore Local-Staten Island Local:

SI Then: The Goethals Bridge

After the First World War, the U.S. was on the move.

With the new prosperity, wanderlust and mass-produced automobiles, the Goethals Bridge was built to accommodate interstate travel.

The bridge opened on June 29, 1928, the same day as the Outerbridge Crossing. Both were designed by John Alexander Low Waddell. This was the first successful bi-state development project by the then-new Port Authority. It sported two 10-foot-wide lanes in each direction.

The new bridge was named after Major General George W. Goethals. Construction supervisor of the Panama Canal and the first consulting engineer of the NY/NJ Port Authority, he died just three months before the bridge’s opening, which also would have been his 70th birthday.

The same month saw the establishment of the Port Authority Police. Its 40 original officers, known as Bridgemen, were deployed to patrol and protect both the Outerbridge and the Goethals bridges.

The Goethals did not recoup its original construction costs until 1964, when the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge was completed.

This year, 3,566,101 EZpass equipped vehicles crossed over it between January and March.

It was finally closed this month when the first of two new parallel bridges opened to replace it. The second will open in 2018. Built higher and wider, they will accommodate more traffic and larger ships passing under them.

Until it is finally dismantled, the original Goethals is truly now only a bridge to the past.


As of July 4th, 2017, the original Goethals Bridge is closed for good, and the first of the new parallel bridges has been officially opened. What name, if any, will be given to them, remains to be seen.

_____________

Continue reading

from Eater New York:

Le Perigord Shutters After 53 Years to De-Unionize

Owner Georges Briguet plans to reopen it as a new restaurant later this year

Update: Local 100 organizer Mike Feld tells Eater that he’s been negotiating with Briguet since last year, and the owner’s been clear that he’s not happy with the increases.…

Continue reading

The Subway Map: The Last 50 Years, The Next 50 Years

Tuesday, October 27, 2015, 6:00pm – 9:30pm at Cooper Union

Timed to the 111th anniversary of the opening of the New York City subway on October 27, 1904, a group of historians and designers gather for a public symposium focusing on the past and future evolution of one of New York City’s most key graphic works: the subway map. Admission is free, but reservations are requested.

During its first half-century, maps of the subway were based on the three original operating companies (IRT, BMT, IMD). Although the subway was unified in 1940, it was not until 1964 that a new basic design was put forward by R. Raleigh D’Adamo that dispensed with the historical operating companies and introduced the modern nomenclature and color-coding of subway routes. Fifty years ago, in the fall of 1965, the Transit Authority adopted D’Adamo’s design concept. The highlight of the history section of this evening will be the launch of the first digital reconstruction of Raleigh D’Adamo’s highly influential hand-drawn map of 1964, which had been lost until last year. …
Program

  • Introduction by Peter B. Lloyd: Why is the transit map an ‘ínformation design’ problem?
  • Presentation by R. Raleigh D’Adamo on how he created his 1964 map.
  • Presentation by Peter B Lloyd on how the map evolved after 1964.
  • Presentation by John Tauranac: who will show how to make today’s MTA subway map into the MTA subway map of tomorrow
  • Presentation by Eddie Jabbour on present and future transit mapping for mobile devices.
  • Panel discussion on how the subway map should evolve in the future.

RSVP

The event is free but please RSVP. Attendees who RSVP will be rewarded with a postcard print of part of Raleigh D’Adamo’s subway map (the downtown segment). This is a Limited print run of 855, available only to attendees who RSVP on Eventbrite.

Located in The Great Hall, in the Foundation Building, 7 East 7th Street, between Third and Fourth Avenues

     

Continue reading

Copyright © 2011-2017 Bygone NYC - All Rights Reserved