Tags:

19th century culture

Start Date : 12.12.2017
Historic Cooking Workshop: Sugar Plums and Wassail

December 12, 6:30 pm

Hands on candy making session with a toast to the holidays

Did you know that there are no plums in sugar plums?  This ancient sweet treat was a favorite of 19th-century New Yorkers.  Learn about their ancient and recent past in this hands-on session, package your treats up for gift giving and toast with some wassail to get the holiday spirit going!

$25 Adults:, $20 Members and Students with ID

At Mount Vernon Hotel Museum & Garden

Continue reading

If time travel were possible, someone visiting New York City during late November through December 100 years ago would find familiar scenes: these 17 photos show how those living in New York City between 1900 and 1915 shopped and stocked up for the holiday season. Despite the pervasiveness of online shopping in modern times, New Yorkers still crowd sidewalks and public places, and do their share of in-person shopping before the holidays. Special, temporary “holiday markets” have become increasingly popular, despite the great improvements made to online shopping in recent years. While those photos from the previous century seem to show that commercialism wasn’t as rampant as it is today, the late 19th century saw the trappings we now associate with Christmas start to spread to all levels of society, although with less thoroughness than in our times. There were some cultural differences, though. Apparently, Christmas postcards were big.

 …

Continue reading

120th Egg Nog Party, December 14
We thought it was just cream, eggs, sugar, and rum, but, hey, what do we know. Chemists, apparently, know the secret to the lip-smacking-est eggnog, and they’re letting us nonscientists have a taste at their annual holiday party. The Chemists’ Club has been hosting this ode to the ’nog for more than a century now, so its secret recipe must be one for the record books (or at least a cookbook). New York Academy of Science, 250 Greenwich Street (between Vesey and Barclay Streets), Tribeca

Continue reading

Mon 07 2017 , by

Up On The Roof

From the blog of The Museum of the City of New York:

Up on the roof, entertainment en plein air

Spring in New York City is glorious.  Allergy issues aside, the season of rebirth is especially welcome after this winter’s polar vortex shenanigans.  And though I celebrate the sunny days and refreshing rain of spring, I can see the heat waves forming on the horizon.  Summer is coming and with it a suffocating wall of humidity.

One of my best strategies to beat the heat is going to the theater. Be it a movie, musical, or play,  the cool darkness of a theater combined with a few hours of entertainment is my preferred place to be on an unbearably hot day.  A hundred years ago, this wasn’t so much the case.  Without air conditioning, the heat of the lights and the crush of fellow audience members could make visiting the theater  intolerable.  Not wishing to lose business during the summer months, theater owners came up with a new strategy: the roof!

Byron Company (New York, N.Y.) [Roof Garden, Madison Square Garden Theatre.] ca. 1900.

Byron Company (New York, N.Y.) Roof Garden, Madison Square Garden Theatre. ca. 1900. Museum of the City of New York, 93.1.1.10866.

In the photograph above, a rooftop audience enjoys some light entertainment on the Madison Square Garden roof.  This MSG was located at 26th Street and Madison Avenue.  Designed by Stanford White, it was the second tallest building in the City at the time construction finished in 1890. Part of the fun for the audience was the chance to watch musical comedies and operettas from 32 stories off the ground. (Check out Mia’s early blog on the theater’s Diana statue.)

Further uptown at 44th and Broadway, the New York Theatre roof offered similar entertainment fare. The New York Theatre was originally built as the Olympia Theatre by  Oscar Hammerstein I (the grandfather of the Oscar Hammerstein from musical theater’s famous “Rodgers & Hammerstein”).

Byron Company (New York, N.Y.) Roof Garden, New York Theatre. ca. 1901. Museum of the City of New York. 93.1.1.10880.

Byron Company (New York, N.Y.) Roof Garden, New York Theatre. ca. 1901. Museum of the City of New York. 93.1.1.10880.

Though a financial failure for Hammerstein I, the theater was only the second to be built in what would become the Times Square Theater District.  In 1895, the area was known as Longacre Square.

Byron Company (New York, N.Y.) Roof Garden, New York Theatre. ca. 1901. Museum of the City of New York, 93.1.1.10877.

Byron Company (New York, N.Y.) Roof Garden, New York Theatre. ca. 1901. Museum of the City of New York, 93.1.1.10877.

Hammerstein I’s second effort at extravagant outdoor entertainment was the  Paradise Roof Garden at 201 West 42nd Street.  Part enclosed space and part open air, the Garden spanned the roofs of  the Victoria Theatre and the Theatre Republic next door.

Byron Company (New York, N.Y.). [Roof Garden, Paradise atop Hammerstein's Victoria.] ca. 1904.

Byron Company (New York, N.Y.). Roof Garden, Paradise atop Hammerstein’s Victoria.]ca. 1901. Museum of the City of New York, 93.1.1.10856.

The Paradise Roof Garden was run by Hammerstein I’s son Willie.  As the noise of an ever expanding New York drifted upward, the vaudeville shows presented on the roof adapted to include wordless routines and pantomime.

Byron Company (New York, N.Y.) [Roof Garden, Paradise atop Hammerstein's Victoria.] ca. 1904.

Byron Company (New York, N.Y.). Roof Garden, Paradise atop Hammerstein’s Victoria. ca.

Continue reading

From The New York Adventure Club e-newsletter:

Crime In NYC: A History Of Vice And Murder (Sat)
Corrupt politicians. Crooked cops. Gangsters so terrifying that they’re known only as “Murder, Incorporated.” These are the men and women that have made New York City’s underworld the stuff of legend. But there is so much more to this legend than you’ve ever heard.
$15-25. Corner of Centre & Chambers Sts . Ticketed event through the New York Adventure Club.…

Continue reading

Corrupt politicians. Crooked cops. Gangsters so terrifying that they’re known only as “Murder, Incorporated.”

These are the men and women that have made New York City’s underworld the stuff of legend. But there is so much more to this legend than you’ve ever heard. Why is it that New York had such a violent past? What drove these people to a life of crime? This is the story of a broken and corrupt system and the clever individuals smart enough to exploit it.

On this walking tour, we’ll explore Lower Manhattan where we’ll discuss the evolution of orphan street gangs into the mafia, con men and bank robbers so rich they rubbed elbows with the Vanderbilts, gun fights that would make the Wild West blush and the politicians that encouraged it. We’ll visit the old Five Points District, Chinatown, the Bowery and of course the Lower East Side. Let us show you how New York’s crime history began.

ticketed event: Sat Aug. 13th 11am-1pm ticket prices: $15.00-$25.00

Corner of Centre & Chambers Sts

Centre Street and Chambers Street
New York, NY

Electronic ticketing though Big Maven

Continue reading

Sunday, August 14 (and Second Sunday of the Month: September 11, October 9, November 13)
12:30 – 1:30 p.m.
A Walking Tour of Historic 19th Century Noho

Join us for a journey back in time to the elite ‘Bond Street area,’ home to Astors, Vanderbilts, Delanos — and the Tredwells, who lived in the Merchant’s House. You’ll walk the footsteps of these wealthy mercantile families whose elegant Federal mansions once lined the tranquil cobblestone streets. Our tour passes by iconic landmarks such as the imposing Colonnade Row, the Public Theater, and The Cooper Union, where Lincoln gave his ‘right makes might’ speech. On the bustling Astor Place, imagine the drama of events that led to the Opera House riot of 1849, among the bloodiest in American history. And visit the site of the scandalous 1857 Bond Street murder of Harvey Burdell, one of the City’s still unsolved crimes.
$10, FREE for Members.

NOTE: Tours are one hour and begin promptly.
Limited to 20 people (first come, first served). No reservations.
Tours are canceled in the case of heavy rain, snow, or extreme heat and cold advisories.…

Continue reading

Saturday, August 13, 2016 | 11 a.m.–12:15 p.m., 1:15–2:30 p.m., or 3:30–4:45 p.m.
Preregistration Required
On a walk through the Herb Garden, discover the colorful history of this maligned spirit—from sordid tales of the past to its myth-busting recent revival. See, smell, and touch the plants that flavor this herbal concoction, and afterward, sample a local distiller’s absinthe served in the classic fashion.$30 member; $32 nonmember. (Fee includes $7 materials charge.)

Note: Must be 21+ to attend.

Section A: Saturday, August 13, 2016 | 11 a.m.–12:15 p.m.
Register Now

Section B: Saturday, August 1, 2015 | 1:15–2:30 p.m.
Register Now

Section C: Saturday, August 1, 2015 | 1:15–2:30 p.m.
Register Now

Continue reading

Thursday, July 28, 6:00-7:30pm

Location: The BraineryFrom the debauched slums of Victorian London to dry martinis and fancy cocktail parties, gin has had a remarkable journey, a story that reflects the ever changing moods and sensibilities of society at large.Like many other spirits, it began life in the alchemist’s workshop as a medicinal cure-all, a link it would retain as a mainstay of European Battlefields and colonial outposts.Gin has had many moments in the sun, but it has had it critics: mothers’ ruin was seen by the puritanical as the scourge of the working classes, and this imagery has informed much of our opinions on its history. But, every time it was proscribed or looked like vanishing it bounced back, re-invented. No time is that more true than today, with a raft of new distilleries popping up – including here in New York.

Join me as I take you on the most incredible voyage across the globe and through every facet of life as we explore the history of Ginand prepare to be surprised! 

21+! 

Cancellation policy

Save

Save

Save

Continue reading

Copyright © 2011-2017 Bygone NYC - All Rights Reserved