Tags:

Alphabet City

From Jeremiah’s Vanishing New York blog:

Monday, July 31, 2017

Before We Got Starfucked

Jen Fisher runs a well-loved book table on the sidewalk at St. Mark’s and Avenue A. Tomorrow, the table will become a memorial exhibit called “Before we got Starfucked: A Memorial for the Lower East Side before it became the East Village.”

Jen and the resident artist Ana Marton describe it as:

“A personal archive of a LES resident from the late 80s to early 90s of photographs, newspaper cuts, flyers and B&W Xerox books will be displayed on Tuesday, August 1st, 2017 from 530-8PM outside, on the corner of Ave A and St. Mark’s Place, where the bookstall usually is.

The archive is based on 80s and 90s events such as The Tent City in Tompkins Square Park, the annual Stations of the Cross, Father George Kuhn, and the fight against gentrification as it was recorded and put together by a resident of the Lower East Side. Seen in the light of today’s ongoing destruction of our neighborhood, we believe that this archive has acquired historical relevance as a record of the Lower East Side and the life it once contained.”

Continue reading

Friday, September 16 at 6:00 PM8:00 PM in EDT
Hosted by Howl Happening
  • 6 E 1st St, New York, New York 10003
  • ticket
    Tickets Available
    www.brownpapertickets.com
    Details
    Opening ReceptionFriday, September 16 – Sunday, October 9, 2016

    Howl! Happening: An Arturo Vega Project is pleased to shine a light on another important source of East Village social and cultural history: The East Village Eye. A monthly magazine published from 1979 through 1987, The East Village Eye focused on popular and avant-garde culture, politics and other issues relevant to the East Village and environs. Self-styled as “a community in print,” the magazine is noted for its groundbreaking coverage of the emerging punk, new wave and hip hop music scenes of the time, as well as the influential art, literature, film and performance worlds of the era.

    The East Village Eye Show will feature covers, centerfolds, interior pages, ephemera and photographic prints, as well as key artwork from the era. The show draws from the nearly 4,000 pages, 3,000 photographs, sets of original copies and attendant materials that constitute The East Village Eye Archive, dubbed “the King Tut’s tomb of downtown New York.”

    Artist and Colab co-founder Christof Kohlhofer was the first art director of the Eye. Kohlhofer, who studied with Joseph Beuys, introduced Abrams to the influential artists who were a part of the flourishing EV art scene. “I credit Christof with steering the Eye towards art, but also for injecting a Beuys-like approach. Basically doing whatever was necessary at the time,” says Abrams in the 2014 Hyperallergic article The East Village Eye: Where Art, Hip Hop, and Punk Collided.

    As a result, the magazine featured art world luminaries including David Wojnarowicz, Richard Hell, Cookie Mueller, Lucy Lippard, and Rene Ricard. The magazine’s covers read like a who’s who of cultural influencers like Patti Astor, Robert Mapplethorpe, and Vito Acconci; emerging artists such as Sue Coe, Barbara Kruger and Kiki Smith; as well as musicians like Patti Smith, Run DMC, Annie Lennox, and the Beastie Boys.

    Richard Hell explained how he and other New Yorkers, and not English kids, “invented” punk; Cookie Mueller dished out bold and often hilarious health advice; Glenn O’Brien, the leading avant-pop writer and media figure, expounded on the New York Yankees; and the aforementioned David Wojnarowicz wrote about his harrowing past and present as a street hustler and later as an artist living with HIV.

    Creative collaboration was the hallmark of the magazine’s legacy. “The mix of fashion, music, art, politics, comics etc., the way it was presented by the Eye, the constant changing impact through all those different people who worked on the paper, and Leonard’s attitude not to interfere with that, made it a very lively subject,” says Kohlhofer in the Hyperallergic article.

    Over a period of eight years, the magazine chronicled the spectacular rise and eventual implosion of the East Village art scene. The Eye’s coverage of the arts and music scenes helped illuminate the psychosocial conflicts running through EV/LES culture, NYC, and beyond.

Continue reading

“44 Amazing NYC Places That Actually Still Exist” (Buzzfeed).

Most are bars and restaurants.

A lot of classic New York City spots might be disappearing, but you can still go to these distinctive shops, bars, and restaurants. For now, anyway.

1. Russ & Daughters, 179 East Houston St. (East Village)

Russ & Daughters, 179 East Houston St. (East Village)

Jeffrey Bary / Via Flickr: 70118259@N00

Russ & Daughters, a family-operated “appetizing store” focused on selling traditional Jewish fish and dairy products, has been a fixture of the Lower East Side since 1914. It’s one of the only existing stores in the entire country dedicated to appetizing.

2. Eddie’s Sweet Shop, 105-29 Metropolitan Ave. #1 (Forest Hills)

Eddie's Sweet Shop, 105-29 Metropolitan Ave. #1 (Forest Hills)

Joe Shlabotnik / Via Flickr: joeshlabotnik

Eddie’s Sweet Shop is an old school ice cream parlor and soda fountain that has served the neighborhood of Forest Hills, Queens, for over a century. It’s not too hard to find ice cream shops that aspire to capturing the vibe of an old-timey soda fountain, but this is the real deal.

3. Strand Book Store, 828 Broadway (East Village)

Strand Book Store, 828 Broadway (East Village)

Postdlf / Via commons.wikimedia.org

Strand may be the single most beloved and iconic used book store in the entire city, and has been a destination for bibliophiles around the world for nearly a century. The store contains a staggering amount of books and truly lives up to its hype.

4. Di Fara Pizza, 1424 Avenue J (Midwood)

Di Fara Pizza, 1424 Avenue J (Midwood)

apasciuto / Via Flickr: apasciuto

Di Fara has been around since the mid-’60s but made the shift from local treasure to a destination spot for world class pizza sometime in the past decade or so. The pizza is so good that people are willing to travel from all over the city and wait for up to three hours to get a pie handcrafted by restaurant founder and pizza auteur Dom DeMarco.

5. Generation Records, 210 Thompson St. (Greenwich Village)

Generation Records, 210 Thompson St. (Greenwich Village)

Daniel Lobo / Via Flickr: daquellamanera

Greenwich Village was once a major destination for record collectors, but this large punk and metal-centric shop is one of the few stores that’s managed to stay open over the years.

6. St. Mark’s Comics, 11 St. Mark’s Place (East Village)

St. Mark's Comics, 11 St. Mark's Place (East Village)

St. Mark’s Place has been heavily gentrified over the past 20 years, but this stalwart comics shop has stuck around despite so many seedy punk and counterculture shops getting replaced with chains like Chipotle and Supercuts. (And yes, this is the comic book store from that one episode of Sex and the City.)

7. Caffe Reggio, 119 Macdougal St. (Greenwich Village)

Caffe Reggio, 119 Macdougal St. (Greenwich Village)

Scott Beale / Via Flickr: laughingsquid

Caffe Reggio has a crucial role in the development of coffee culture in the United States — it was the first establishment to sell cappuccino in America back in the 1920s. The cafe still has its original espresso machine, which dates back to 1902, and was purchased by founder Domenico Parisi when he opened the place in 1927.

8. Old Town Bar on 45 East 18th St.

Continue reading

Copyright © 2011-2017 Bygone NYC - All Rights Reserved