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anniversaries

120th Egg Nog Party, December 14
We thought it was just cream, eggs, sugar, and rum, but, hey, what do we know. Chemists, apparently, know the secret to the lip-smacking-est eggnog, and they’re letting us nonscientists have a taste at their annual holiday party. The Chemists’ Club has been hosting this ode to the ’nog for more than a century now, so its secret recipe must be one for the record books (or at least a cookbook). New York Academy of Science, 250 Greenwich Street (between Vesey and Barclay Streets), Tribeca

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April 2017 marks fifty years since the
Museum received its charter from the New
York State Department of Education Board of
Regents. Over that fifty years the Museum has
grown dramatically, collecting artifacts and
works of art documenting the rise of New York
as a port city.; developing and implementing
innovative and award-winning programming;
mounting exhibitions; and preserving a fleet of
historic ships on the East River. Despite three
massive setbacks: the 9/11 attacks, the Great
Recession of 2008, and the floodwaters of hurri-
cane Sandy, the museum is growing once again.
With support from New York City and a dedi-
cated group of staff, volunteers, members and
friends, the Seaport Museum remains an edu-
cational and cultural gem in lower Manhattan.
The Seaport Museum’s 50th anniversary will
be marked throughout the year with the open-
ing of new exhibitions, including Millions:
Migrants and Millionaires aboard the Great
Liners, 1900-1914 (opening June 2017), artistic
and musical performances, lectures and book
talks, walking tours, and a formal 50th anni-
versary cocktail reception aboard the 1885 ship
Wavertree in September. #

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The Seaport Museum’s 50th anniversary will be marked throughout the year with the opening of new exhibitions, including Millions: Migrants and Millionaires aboard the Great Liners, 1900-1914 (opening June 2017), artistic and musical performances, lectures and book talks, walking tours, and a formal 50th anniversary cocktail reception aboard the 1885 ship Wavertree in September.

Upcoming Exhibition:
Millions: Migrants and Millionaires aboard the Great Liners, 1900-1914, will open at the South Street Seaport Museum in June 2017. Between 1900 and 1914 New York experienced the greatest influx of immigrants in its history. The Seaport Museum’s lightship Ambrose (LV-87), which marked the entrance of New York Harbor from 1908 until 1932, was onsite for the last few years of this wave of immigration. Carried across the Atlantic aboard ocean liners such as Titanic’s sister Olympic, these migrants shared these ships with some of the wealthiest people in the world. This exhibition will explore the tensions between the extraordinarily wealthy First-Class passengers and immigrants in Third Class. Even though First Class and Third Class sailed together on the same ships, their journeys were worlds apart.

ABOUT SOUTH STREET SEAPORT MUSEUM
South Street Seaport Museum is a non-profit cultural institution located in the heart of the historic Seaport district in New York City. Founded in 1967, the South Street Seaport Museum preserves and interprets the history of New York as a great port city. Designated by Congress as America’s National Maritime Museum, the Museum houses galleries and education spaces, working nineteenth century print shops, a maritime library, a maritime craft center, and a fleet of historic vessels that all work to tell the story of “Where New York Begins.”…

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-Event Passed-

from CityLimits.org:

April 29 @ 11:00 am5:00 pm

South Street Seaport Museum celebrates its 50th Anniversary

The South Street Seaport Museum, situated in the original port that built New York into the city it is today, will celebrate fifty years this year! The Seaport Museum invites the city to join in the celebration of this important milestone, which will be recognized over an entire year (April 2017-April 2018) of special programming and exhibitions. …

April 2017 marks fifty years since the Museum received its charter from the New York State Department of Education Board of Regents. Over that fifty years the Museum has grown dramatically, collecting artifacts and works of art documenting the rise of New York as a port city.; developing and implementing innovative and award-winning programming; mounting exhibitions; and preserving a fleet of historic ships on the East River. Despite three massive setbacks: the 9/11 attacks, the Great Recession of 2008, and the floodwaters of hurricane Sandy, the museum is growing once again. With support from New York City and a dedicated group of staff, volunteers, members and friends, the Seaport Museum remains an educational and cultural gem in lower Manhattan.

The Seaport Museum’s 50th anniversary will be marked throughout the year with the opening of new exhibitions, including Millions: Migrants and Millionaires aboard the Great Liners, 1900-1914 (opening June 2017), artistic and musical performances, lectures and book talks, walking tours, and a formal 50th anniversary cocktail reception aboard the 1885 ship Wavertree in September.

Capt. Jonathan Boulware, Executive Director of the Museum, spoke enthusiastically about the anniversary. “It’s a great privilege to celebrate the five-decade life of this vital institution. We’re here in the original fabric of old New York, the ships, the piers, the 19th-century buildings. It’s the history of New York, but the topics we cover are still highly relevant today. The original values that made New York what it is, the Dutch values of trade and tolerance, the New York values of immigration, of multiculturalism, and of ambition, these all touch on urgent issues of New York and America today. Indeed, as we celebrate this important anniversary, we’re also celebrating the very best of New York values, past, present, and future.”

A brief history of the Seaport Museum:
The Museum proper is housed several buildings known collectively as Schermerhorn Row, but when completed in 1812, Schermerhorn Row was, in many respects, the city’s first world trade center. The Row housed a series of counting houses where merchants bought and sold coffee, tea, cotton, molasses, and countless other trade goods from around the world. South Street was nicknamed ‘the Street of Ships’ for the countless sailing ships that docked there, linking the city with some of the most important centers of trade in Europe, the Caribbean, South America, California, and China. The commercial activity along South Street had by the mid-nineteenth century transformed New York from a former British colonial outpost, into the largest city in the United States that controlled half the country’s trade.

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OPENS Thursday, December 1, through Monday, January 9
Exhibition –
Ch
arles Dickens Performs ‘A Christmas Carol’ in New York, December 1867

In December 1867, Charles Dickens arrived in New York City for a month of sold-out performances of his beloved 1843 holiday classic, A Christmas Carol. Dickens performed at the 2,500 seat Steinway Hall on 14th Street, the center of cultural life in the city, and just a few blocks from the Tredwell home. And the critics raved: “The Christmas Carol becomes doubly enchanting when one hears it performed by Dickens.” (New York Herald, 1867)
Exhibition in conjunction with A CHRISTMAS CAROL at the MERCHANT’S HOUSE, December 7-24.
Guest curator, Dayle Vander Sande…

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sat + sun various times: more than 275 nyc historic landmarks and private
residences open their doors for tours and talks for the 14th annual open
house new york weekend. free.

Besides this, several buildings which are part of National Parks property within the NY Metro area are open to the public for free as well. From the OHNY website:

“Open House New York is proud to partner with the National Park Service to present Celebrating a Centennial – National Park Service, a special 2016 OHNY Weekend celebration of the nation’s most treasured sites and to help kick-off a second century of preservation and stewardship.

Experiences include after-hours tours of Hamilton Grange National Memorial, the historic home of Alexander Hamilton, and the General Grant National Memorial, the final resting place of Ulysses S. Grant; NPS Ranger-led tours of the African Burial Ground National Monument, the hallowed ground where free and enslaved Africans were buried through the late 18th century, and the Stonewall National Monument, one of the National Park Service’s newest site.

Open House New York an the National Park Service are also presenting “Empty Ellis”, a special tour of Ellis Island that lands at sunrise before it opens the public. On Saturday, October 15, twenty lucky winners will have the opportunity to explore the Ellis Island National Museum of Immigration as the early morning sun bathes the Great Hall in a quiet stillness rarely experienced by the site’s four million visitors each year. Tickets to this tour are being raffled here. Entries will be accepted through 5pm on Tuesday, October 5. Winners will be randomly selected and announced that day.

“…

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from SiLive.com:
Schaffer’s Tavern: Historic Staten Island restaurant is closing

By Pamela Silvestri

on September 14, 2016 at 1:22 PM, updated September 15, 2016 at 11:00 AM

STATEN ISLAND, N.Y. — Rumors have been afloat for more than a year that Schaffer’s Tavern was sold. Well, turns out there’s truth behind the talk.

Pending regulatory and Buildings Department approvals, Victory State Bank is taking over a long-term lease of the historic space at 2055 Victory Blvd. in Meiers Corners.

Construction of a new building will begin in early 2017, according to Joe LiBassi, Victory’s founder and chairman. When that happens, proprietor Winky Schaffer and his family will retire from the restaurant business.

A final day of Schaffer’s Tavern service has not been announced.

SOLID ROOTS ON STATEN ISLAND

Back in March, when rumors ran rampant of a bank taking over the spot, Schaffer shrugged off the chatter as he tended bar. He couldn’t complain about business and admitted it’s been a great stretch — 83 years in Meiers Corners — making the place the longest-running family-owned eatery on Staten Island.

Photos: A look at the enduring appeal of Staten Island's Schaffer's Tavern

Photos: A look at the enduring appeal of Staten Island’s Schaffer’s Tavern

Schaffer’s Tavern, the longest running family-owned restaurant in the borough, celebrates its 80th year

“Hello, my friend! How ya doin’?” said Winky back on that balmy spring day. He reached over to the side to shake hands with a patron, then took back to his spot behind the taps filling chilled mugs with beer.

There’s a lot of history within these knotted pine walls, many fond memories of families and neighborhood “good people” types, Schaffer has said.

And, the story of Schaffer’s goes like this: Winky’s grandfather, George, had a speakeasy, located at the top of Jewett Avenue at Victory Boulevard in the 1920s. (That’s where a Burger King is now.) When Prohibition ended, George opened Schaffer’s in its current building (2055 Victory Boulevard) purchased in 1933. The structure resembles a Bavarian tavern with its flower boxes and roof line.

Winky manages the restaurant with sons Chad and Troy. Some of the family members live in two apartments upstairs.

On Tuesday, waitress Mary Karpeles shuttled to tables Schaffer’s famed pastrami and separate platter of tender, brown sauce-topped fresh sliced ham served with string beans and mashed potatoes. She’s been a server at the restaurant for over 30 years and knows customers by name.

Other long-time employees are held in high esteem like the Schaffers’ late bartenders — Ed Cicci, Ed Lunny, Peter Barquin, Charles “Cookie” Farley, Ed Noonen — who are memorialized in the front room.

THE FEEL OF SCHAFFER’S

Detail inside the two-room tavern include ceramic tile floors and auburn woodwork, both original to Schaffer’s. Only the bar has changed: Seventeen years ago, a fire damaged a mantle that hung over the space and subsequently a carpenter named Joe Tuite built a new back-bar.

Other traditions in the place include small jars or bowls of hot red peppers and vinegar-pickled green tomatoes, potato pancakes and sauteed red cabbage.…

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from dna.info:

111-Year-Old East Village Art Supply Shop Closing by End of Summer

By Allegra Hobbs | July 12, 2016 12:40pm

 New York Central Art Supply, which has sold art supplies at 62 Third Ave. since 1905, will close within the coming months.

New York Central Art Supply, which has sold art supplies at 62 Third Ave. since 1905, will close within the coming months. View Full Caption

New York Central Art Supply

EAST VILLAGE — A 111-year-old art supply store will shutter for good by the end of the summer as its beloved Third Avenue storefront — once patronized by such artists as Andy Warhol and Willem de Kooning — changes ownership, the owners announced on Monday.

New York Central Art Supply will vacate the 62 Third Ave. storefront by the end of September, according Doug Steinberg, whose family has owned the shop since its launch in 1905 — and while the sale of the building has been the impetus for the closure, he said, the business has for years been struggling to stay afloat as the way artists shop for supplies has changed significantly.

“The building being sold just puts a hard date on what was an inevitability — even if the building wasn’t being sold, the business was still not healthy enough to survive,” he said.

“People shop online, people shop at chain stores — we’re just seeing the volume of traffic that comes into the store way down from what it used to be.”

The shop last year hosted a “warehouse sale” in preparation for restructuring the business to compete with such art supply giants as Blick Art Materials, Steinberg said at the time, dispelling rumors the shop would be closing.

The store must be vacated by the end of September, said Steinberg, and it will hold on for as long as the remaining inventory holds out. Until the closure, shoppers can stock up on art supplies on the cheap, with 20 to 50-percent discounts storewide, said Steinberg.

Steinberg first announced the closure on Monday in a letter posted to the shop’s website.

“Our amazing customers over the course of the last 111 years, from fledgling students to modern masters, have made this business unique and rewarding for each of [us] here at Central over the years,” reads the letter, signed ‘The Steinberg Family, The Norins Family & the entire New York Central team.’

Meanwhile, the owners will be “entertaining any offers to acquire our inventory and intellectual property,” according to the letter — and Steinberg confirmed it is unlikely there will be another incarnation of the supply shop, noting renting would be too expensive and it would be difficult to keep enough merchandise to run an online store.

“There really are no alternatives,” he said.

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from

New-York Historical Society :

Today, American Historical Theatre helped us recreate the moments that led to the infamous duel between Alexander Hamilton and Aaron Burr on July 11, 1804. In a letter to Burr on June 20, Hamilton wrote: “I have maturely reflected on the subject of your letter of the 18th, and the more I have reflected, the more I have become convinced that I could not … make the avowal or disavowal which you seem to think necessary.” Their war of words culminated in their meeting in Weehawken, New Jersey. “…as the seconds do not precisely agree on that point. The pistols were discharged within a few seconds of each other and the fire of Colonel Burr took effect; General Hamilton almost instantly fell.”

Photos: Don Pollard…

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