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Arthur Avenue

Walk the garden where American Author and humorist Mark Twain, world-famous Italian conductor Arturo Toscanini, and President Theodore Roosevelt once lived.

Tour the oldest house in The Bronx, which served as the temporary headquarters of General George Washington.

Visit a fieldstone farmhouse that was the site of six skirmishes between American troops and British forces.

See where American writer Edgar Allan Poe penned some of his most memorable works.

Experience a 19th century estate located in the largest park in New York City.

Take a trolley tour of historic homes and gardens of The Bronx!

Trolley makes a quick “light lunch” stop at Arthur Avenue, the Real Little Italy!

Tickets $50 online through BigMaven

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Bronx, NY

 Walk the garden where American Author and humorist Mark Twain, world-famous Italian conductor Arturo Toscanini, and President Theodore Roosevelt once lived.

Tour the oldest house in The Bronx, which served as the temporary headquarters of General George Washington.

Visit a fieldstone farmhouse that was the site of six skirmishes between American troops and British forches.

See where American writer Edgar Allan Poe penned some of his most memorable works.

Experience a 19th century estate located in the largest park in New York City.

Take a trolley tour of historic homes and gardens of The Bronx!

Trolley makes a quick “light lunch” stop at Arthur Avenue, the Real Little Italy!

When
Where
The Bronx Tourism Council – 851 Grand Concourse, Bronx, NY 10451

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Date: Thu. Jun 9, 2016

Location: Arthur Avenue Floral 615 E 187th St, 2nd Floor
Bronx, NY 14058

Time: 7:00pm – 8:30pm EDT

Buy tickets online here.

Belmont, known as Arthur Avenue or the Little Italy of the Bronx — or, to some, “the real Little Italy” — is one of New York City’s oldest Italian-American neighborhoods. Generations of Italian families have given this neighborhood a small-town character and a strong culinary identity.

 

Though the neighborhood has changed, with Puerto Ricans, Albanians, and Fordham students outnumbering Italians, many shops and restaurants are still owned and operated by the families who opened them three generations ago. And many Italian-Americans return often to the neighborhood, maintaining cultural and economic ties through the purchase of specialty food items that have become part and parcel of their family traditions.

 

Join us for a conversation moderated by Dr. Rocco Marinaccio of Manhattan College and including Angel Hernandez of the Bronx County Historical Society, plus local business owners. Afterward, stay for a reception with tastings from the neighborhood.

 

Panelists

 

  • Chris Borgatti, owner, Borgatti’s Ravioli & Egg Noodles
  • David Greco, chef and owner, The Original Arthur Avenue Italian Deli (AKA Mike’s Deli), Arthur Avenue Catering
  • Angel Hernandez, Education Coordinator, Bronx County Historical Society
  • Carmela Lucciola, owner, Egidio Pastry Shop
  • Rocco Marinaccio, PhD, Professor of English, Manhattan College (moderator)
  • Gil Teitel, owner, Teitel Brothers
  • Vera Terranova, co-owner, Terranova Bakery

 

This program is part of the Museum of Food and Drink’s MOFAD City series and is supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council. Check out MOFAD City’s full lineup at programs.mofad.org.

 

PLEASE NOTE: East 187th Street from Arthur Avenue to Cambreleng Avenue will be closed the day of the event.

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“44 Amazing NYC Places That Actually Still Exist” (Buzzfeed).

Most are bars and restaurants.

A lot of classic New York City spots might be disappearing, but you can still go to these distinctive shops, bars, and restaurants. For now, anyway.

1. Russ & Daughters, 179 East Houston St. (East Village)

Russ & Daughters, 179 East Houston St. (East Village)

Jeffrey Bary / Via Flickr: 70118259@N00

Russ & Daughters, a family-operated “appetizing store” focused on selling traditional Jewish fish and dairy products, has been a fixture of the Lower East Side since 1914. It’s one of the only existing stores in the entire country dedicated to appetizing.

2. Eddie’s Sweet Shop, 105-29 Metropolitan Ave. #1 (Forest Hills)

Eddie's Sweet Shop, 105-29 Metropolitan Ave. #1 (Forest Hills)

Joe Shlabotnik / Via Flickr: joeshlabotnik

Eddie’s Sweet Shop is an old school ice cream parlor and soda fountain that has served the neighborhood of Forest Hills, Queens, for over a century. It’s not too hard to find ice cream shops that aspire to capturing the vibe of an old-timey soda fountain, but this is the real deal.

3. Strand Book Store, 828 Broadway (East Village)

Strand Book Store, 828 Broadway (East Village)

Postdlf / Via commons.wikimedia.org

Strand may be the single most beloved and iconic used book store in the entire city, and has been a destination for bibliophiles around the world for nearly a century. The store contains a staggering amount of books and truly lives up to its hype.

4. Di Fara Pizza, 1424 Avenue J (Midwood)

Di Fara Pizza, 1424 Avenue J (Midwood)

apasciuto / Via Flickr: apasciuto

Di Fara has been around since the mid-’60s but made the shift from local treasure to a destination spot for world class pizza sometime in the past decade or so. The pizza is so good that people are willing to travel from all over the city and wait for up to three hours to get a pie handcrafted by restaurant founder and pizza auteur Dom DeMarco.

5. Generation Records, 210 Thompson St. (Greenwich Village)

Generation Records, 210 Thompson St. (Greenwich Village)

Daniel Lobo / Via Flickr: daquellamanera

Greenwich Village was once a major destination for record collectors, but this large punk and metal-centric shop is one of the few stores that’s managed to stay open over the years.

6. St. Mark’s Comics, 11 St. Mark’s Place (East Village)

St. Mark's Comics, 11 St. Mark's Place (East Village)

St. Mark’s Place has been heavily gentrified over the past 20 years, but this stalwart comics shop has stuck around despite so many seedy punk and counterculture shops getting replaced with chains like Chipotle and Supercuts. (And yes, this is the comic book store from that one episode of Sex and the City.)

7. Caffe Reggio, 119 Macdougal St. (Greenwich Village)

Caffe Reggio, 119 Macdougal St. (Greenwich Village)

Scott Beale / Via Flickr: laughingsquid

Caffe Reggio has a crucial role in the development of coffee culture in the United States — it was the first establishment to sell cappuccino in America back in the 1920s. The cafe still has its original espresso machine, which dates back to 1902, and was purchased by founder Domenico Parisi when he opened the place in 1927.

8. Old Town Bar on 45 East 18th St.

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