Tags:

Brooklyn

Date

Sep 6, 2017 • 7:00 PM – 9:00 PM

Cost

FREE and OPEN TO THE PUBLIC!

Location

Gallery at BRIC House

647 Fulton Street
(Enter on Rockwell Place)
Brooklyn, NY 11217

United States
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Sergio Purtell, courtesy of the artist and Art 3 Gallery, Brooklyn

JOIN US FOR THE OPENING RECEPTION!

EXHIBITION ON VIEW: September 7 – October 29, 2017

CURATED BY: Elizabeth Ferrer

 

Brooklyn Photographs brings together the work of 11 photographers who have turned their lens on the Brooklyn experience from the late 1960s to the present.  Each of these photographers will present a body of work on a specific theme – childhood in Williamsburg in the 1960s, Halloween in the 1970s, or Bushwick street life in the 1980s, to name a few.  More recent work from the last decade will explore such subjects as the rapidly gentrifying post-industrial landscape, Brooklyn artists, and the microcosm of street life visible near BRIC’s facility at the intersection of Fulton and Flatbush.  In sum, the exhibition will illuminate the important role that photography has had in preserving aspects of Brooklyn’s neighborhoods and traditions, and in documenting the extraordinary cultural and social diversity that is a hallmark of the borough.  It will also reflect the borough as a site of continual change. Neighborhoods transform and new populations emerge, while the essence of Brooklyn’s humanity remains. The exhibition will be accompanied by a catalogue and by public programs.

Photographers include: Yolanda Andrade, Stefanie Apple, Nelson Bakerman, Leigh Davis, Max Kozloff, George Malave, Meryl Meisler, Patrick D. Pagnano, Sergio Purtell, Larry Racioppo, and Russell Frederick .

READ ABOUT THE EXHIBITION IN THE NEW YORK TIMES LENS BLOG >>

Special thanks to Duggal Visual Solutions, Griffin Editions, and Pranayama Art for their services in relation to this exhibition.

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Thu 08 2017 , by

Bygone Stables

From The New York Post:

The fascinating history behind NYC’s stables-turned-real estate

Washington Mews, a little alley north of Washington Square Park, is an urban gem. Still paved with Belgian block and lined with quaint cottages, it’s a Greenwich Village street that might as well be in Europe. In fact, cities like London and Paris are filled with these tiny picturesque thoroughfares, whose cute little homes once stabled horses, carriages and sleighs.

Due to quirks in New York’s history and design, these mews are exceedingly rare in the city, making carriage-house living both scarce and coveted. Often disguised behind modest, original facades, many converted carriage homes contain architectural wonders hidden from view.

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Washington Mews: One of Manhattan’s rare alleys lined with former stables, this stretch was designed to service a row of 1830s homes along Washington Square Park.Annie Wermiel/NY Post

Take investor David Aldea’s home at 23 Cornelia St., which Taylor Swift rented in 2016. The 5,500-square-foot West Village pad was asking $40,000/month then, and is on the market with Corcoran for $24.5 million. Walking down the street, the home’s massive, arched wooden doors hint at its 1912 carriage house origins, but the unprepossessing facade might not stop passersby in their tracks.

Upon entering, however, it’s clear this is no ordinary stable: today, the garden level is graced by a 25-foot swimming pool, while an ornate Murano glass chandelier hangs from double-height ceilings. But, as Aldea notes, despite these modern touches, original details abound, particularly in the living room, where there are “24-inch square windows that would have been for the horses to stick their heads out for ventilation.”

Considering the fact that New York was a horse-and-carriage town for so many centuries, it’s surprising that there aren’t more such conversions. That’s in part because most remnants of the city’s colonial days are long gone. Also, Manhattan’s populated areas used to be far more compact; their borders barely extended north of today’s City Hall until the 1820s. The majority of New Yorkers, it seems, walked almost everywhere nearly two centuries ago.

A new street layout in the first decades of the 19th century helped the city expand, and travel by private carriage became more common — but only for the city’s elite. So few New Yorkers could afford to maintain a horse that when a commission laid out the city’s famous grid in 1811, the plan purposely excluded rear alleys for stables. Even by the Civil War, a mere 3 percent of NYC residents owned their own horses and carriages.

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Annie Wermiel/NY Post

A few early mews still exist. Take Washington Mews, which was erected behind the stately homes of “The Row,” one of New York’s first planned “terraces” of homes — a clear sign that the 1832-built Washington Square townhouses were only for the well-heeled.

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Thomas Paine and The Flame Of Revolution“-from ThoughtGallery.org:

When: Thu., August 17, 2017 at 7:30 pm

This Olio covers the life and writing of Thomas Paine during the end of the 18th century. Starting with Common Sense and The Crisis Papers, the talk focuses on the integral role of Paine in not only the American Revolution, but the creation of an “American” political ideology.

The first part is a biographical sketch of Thomas Paine and description of the social and political climate in 18th century England. An explanation of conflicts leading up to the writing of Common Sense and The Declaration of Independence, the talks establishes a historical context for the American Revolution and the subsequent events in the young nation. Thomas Paine’s involvement in the revolution and his work for the Continental Congress place him in the center of activity.

The French Revolution signaled a new chapter in Paine’s life. Once again with The Rights of Man and The Age of Reason he was able to put into words the momentous spirit of the times. This Olio explains the characterization of Paine as a preeminent philosopher and the genesis of radical politics as a force in world events.

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Vanishing New York, the book, was officially released this past Tuesday, after having been available for pre-order. However, assorted independent book shops in the New York area are scheduling book-launch events at their individual locations.

From Vanishing New York, the blog:

You can also get a copy at the launch party this Thursday night at Housing Works Bookstore Cafe, or next Thursday night at the Brooklyn launch party at powerHouse Arena. For a full list of book events, click here.

In the meantime, check out two exclusive excerpts: the East Village chapter at Longreads and the tourism chapter at Vice.

 …

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From Hyperallergic:


Aerial view up the East River (May 27, 1960, photo by Theodore V. Donaldson)
Aerial view up the East River (May 27, 1960, photo by Theodore V. Donaldson) (all images courtesy NYC Municipal Archives)

The Brooklyn waterfront is radically changing. The Domino Sugar Factory in Williamsburg is transforming into residential and commercial space, both inside its hollowed-out brick building and outside with new glassy high-rises. Towers are pending for long-quiet Greenpoint. And Brooklyn Bridge Park is altering the former industrial area of Dumbo and Brooklyn Heights with green space and, naturally, condos. It’s from the perspective of that park that the NYC Municipal Archives examined the East River shore’s long history of change.

A Century on the Brooklyn Waterfront was one of the shipping container exhibitions at Photoville, held earlier this month in the Pier 5 Uplands in Brooklyn Bridge Park. Curated by Public Records Officer Quinn Berkman and Paper and Archival Conservator Cynthia Brenwall, the exhibition drew on the NYC Municipal Archives’ 221,000 cubic feet of material, particularly its collections on the WPA Federal Writers’ and Art projects (1935–43) and the Department of Bridges (1901–39).

“The ability to appreciate what parks were before they were public recreational areas is important, and the Brooklyn Bridge Park is so relevant because the transformation is so recent,” Berkman told Hyperallergic. Many of the photographs were printed from glass plate negatives, and date from between 1870 and 1974, revealing the rise of the Brooklyn Bridge, and the concentration of maritime commercial activity on the Brooklyn piers long before they were replaced with parks.

View of Lower Manhattan from the Brooklyn Tower of the Brooklyn Bridge (1890)
View of Lower Manhattan from the Brooklyn Tower of the Brooklyn Bridge (1890) (click to enlarge)

“I think it is important to remember that Brooklyn was the heart of the city’s import business,” Berkman explained. “What is now seen as real estate opportunity was once used purely for the ports and trade industry.” It was only in the 1970s that the area was designated as a landmarked neighborhood and the repurposing of warehouses began. “It’s pretty incredible because once the Brooklyn Bridge opened, this part of Brooklyn was considered Manhattan’s first suburb, however by the 60s it cycled back into an industrial zone and now it is back to being a residential neighborhood,” she added.

The NYC Municipal Archives has recently been making more of its photographs accessible online, from the documentation of the NYPD’s “Alien Squad,” which monitored potentially subversive political groups in the 1930s and ’40s, to the around 30,000 crime photographs from 1914 to 1975 released earlier this year. As the photographs were taken for municipal government use — during the construction of the Brooklyn-Queens Expressway or the renovation of the Brooklyn Piers, for instance — some of the creators’ names are now lost. In addition to their original purposes, they now form an essential record of the city’s changing character.

“These photographs are not just ‘iconic’ images of old NYC, they are used to understand and preserve the history of the city,” Berkman said. “Photography is one of the best mediums to use to tell a story and send a message, which is also why it has just as complex of a history as New York does.”

View of the Manhattan Bridge from Jay and York Streets (January 4, 1912, photo by Eugene de Salignac)
View of the Manhattan Bridge from Jay and York Streets (January 4, 1912, photo by Eugene de Salignac)
Aerial view of the Brooklyn-Queens Expressway and Atlantic Avenue (September 19, 1956)
Aerial view of the Brooklyn-Queens Expressway and Atlantic Avenue (September 19, 1956)
Aerial view taken above Atlantic Avenue and the Brooklyn-Queens Expressway. 1 Brooklyn Bridge Park was once home to the New York Dock Company. (September 19, 1956) (photo by Theodore V. Donaldson)
Aerial view taken above Atlantic Avenue and the Brooklyn-Queens Expressway.

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Officially releasing on July 15th, the book Secret Brooklyn: An Unusual Guide is written and photographed by Untapped Cities founder Michelle Young and co-founder Augustin Pasquet. To celebrate, we’ll be hosting a launch party for the book on Thursday, July 13th at the Brooklyn Superhero Supply Co., one of the 100+ amazing places in this book.

The party is produced in partnership with the website Brokelyn and will feature a presentation by Michelle and Augustin about their favorite spots and the process of making this book. Refreshments will be served and there will be opportunity to purchase books, get them autographed and meet the authors.

Entry is free, but RSVP is required:

Book Now

Can’t make the event? Purchase the book on Amazon here: http://amzn.to/2tVS4r9

Here’s a little preview of what’s inside:

Discover secret museums, go on an urban safari for wild parrots, locate a landmarked tree, enter the oldest building in New York City, watch a performance of robots in a church, stand tall next to hobbit doors on an otherwise normal residential street, learn how to breathe fire, swallow swords, hammer a nail into your skull and charm a snake, touch the oldest subway tunnel in the world and the world’s smallest Torah, forage for food in Prospect Park, taste wine atop the world’s first commercial rooftop vineyard, step inside a grocery store frozen in 1939, take in a basketball game inside a historic movie theater.

Brooklyn offers countless opportunities to step off the beaten path and is home to any number of well-hidden treasures that are revealed only to residents and travelers who are ready to explore. Secret Brooklyn An Unusual Guide is an indispensable guide for those who think they already know Brooklyn or would like to discover its hidden places, taking you far from the crowds and the usual clichés.

 Brooklyn Superhero Supply Co., Secret Brooklyn: An Unusual Guid

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The Grand Neptune Ball

Open Bar. Live Band. High Seas. (A Fundraiser.)

A celebration on the historic Waterfront Museum Barge –  a boat and nonprofit that is raising funds for renewed arts and education programs after our Superstorm Sandy refit.

Join us for free local fare and spirits! And for the midsummer sunset! Come to dance to live jazz! Come as your most extravagant self! Come support arts and education aboard the historic barge!! Cocktail attire, and any a nod to the maritime 1920s, is encouraged. Music by Steve Oates and the Zac Greenberg Quartet.

The Waterfront Barge
July 22, 2017 at 8-11pm
290 Conover St. Brooklyn, NY
Tickets $50 – $100 (Tax-deductible)

Tickets can be purchased here and at the door.

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Take a fascinatingly risqué journey through time at this immersive lecture and multi-act burlesque show.

  • Sunday, July 9, 2017
  • 7:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m.
  • $20.00 USD
  • 635 Sackett Street, Brooklyn, New York, 11217, United States

Join the Atlas Obscura Society New York for an evening of bawdy discovery and lively libations as we delve into the history of burlesque, an enchanting form of performance that has shimmied, shaked, and shifted with the times over a transformative century in America.

The sensational Doctor Lucky, the World’s Premiere Ph(Double)D, will be your guide as we fill your imaginations with titillating tales from the past. Doctor Lucky’s long and deep resume includes the production of many popular burlesque shows and the instruction of students at prestigious establishments such as NYU, MICA, and CUNY on “The History of American Burlesque.”

As Lucky chronicles the story of burlesque, a dazzling array of in-the-flesh performances will demonstrate a range of burlesque styles from the past and present. You’ll be invited to sip from specialty cocktails prepared by the bar as you’re swept away by revealing historical revelations on the new, state-of-the-art Littlefield stage.

Performers for this event have been curated to include many of the greatest currently operating in the New York scene: Gin Minsky, Corvette Le Face, Ms. Tickle, Perle NoireLil’ Miss Lixx and the Lady Aye.

DETAILS

QUESTIONS?

Email michelle.bruenn@atlasobscura.com.

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Parade of Trains at Brighton Beach

Saturday, June 17 | 11:00 am4:00 pm

The Museum’s vintage train cars are headed on a special trip to the end of the line – the BMT Brighton line, that is! Ride the rails in historic style on Saturday, June 17th and Sunday, June 18th by hopping on and off a selection of the Museum’s vintage fleet at the Brighton Beach station B/Q platforms, including BRT/BMT “Standards,” BMT D-Type Triplex, and IND R1/9s!

Find out more »

FREE with the swipe of a MetroCard!

Parade of Trains at Brighton Beach

Sunday, June 18 | 11:00 am4:00 pm

The Museum’s vintage train cars are headed on a special trip to the end of the line – the BMT Brighton line, that is! Ride the rails in historic style on Saturday, June 17th and Sunday, June 18th by hopping on and off a selection of the Museum’s vintage fleet at the Brighton Beach station B/Q platforms, including BRT/BMT “Standards,” BMT D-Type Triplex, and IND R1/9s!

Find out more »

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sat 5pm: take in the view of the manhattan skyline as participants (maybe
you?) sound their own barbaric yawp during the 13th annual marathon
reading of walt whitman’s ‘song of myself.’ brooklyn bridge park’s granite
prospect, free.

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