Tags:

costumed re-enactors

Sat, October 14th, 2017 |

11:00 am to 4:00 pm

Free with Museum Admission
Recommended for all ages

On October 14, 1781, Lieutenant Colonel Alexander Hamilton made his famous charge to capture Redoubt Ten in the Battle of Yorktown. Come to the Museum ready with your questions for Hamilton! Portrayed by a Living Historian, Lt. Col. Hamilton tells you how he helped win the climactic campaign of the Revolutionary War. Don’t miss your chance to learn a military drill from the War for Independence under the instruction of Hamilton himself!

We’re celebrating Hamilton’s military career with Living History all weekend. Join us on Sunday to meet the New York City militia that Hamilton joined while he was still in school!


Living History Days at N-YHS
Living History: Hamilton’s Militia, Now Recruiting!
Sunday, October 15th, 2017 | 11:00 am – 4:00 pm

Free with Museum Admission
Recommended for all ages

Immerse yourself in the independent militia company that started Hamilton’s military career! Meet the Hearts of Oak, a troop of Living Historians who portray the group of young volunteers that came together in colonial New-York on the eve of the American Revolution in 1775. Some members of the militia, like Hamilton, were students at King’s College—known today as Columbia University! Take a close look at their distinctive green coats, listen to fife and drum music, and experience a military drill.

We’re celebrating Hamilton’s military career with Living History all weekend. On Saturdaymeet Lieutenant Colonel Alexander Hamilton and learn about his victory at the Battle of Yorktown that happened on this weekend in 1781!

Continue reading

From Governors Island official calendar: Civil War Weekend 2017
Aug 12, 2017 – Aug 13
10:00 am – 4:30 pm
Governors Island National Monument
Presented by the National Park ServiceMeet Union soldiers in the Soldier’s camp, watch musket and artillery firing demonstrations, and listen to Civil War music performances!

Artillery Demonstration and Small Arms Demonstration
Watch us fire a real 1860s-era cannon and demonstrate a variety of muskets soldiers would have used during that time period.

Getting There
5 Minutes from Soissons Landing 10 Minutes from Yankee Pier
3 Minutes from Soissons Landing 5 Minutes from Yankee Pier

Continue reading

From Inside Hook e-newsletter:

American History for the day: “Storyville” refers to the early 20th-century red light district of New Orleans. Sixteen blocks along which the oldest profession in the world was sanctioned by John Q. Law. It had guidebooks and everything.And now, it’s back. Right here in New York.They’re calling it Lulu’s Dove House, a monthly bit of immersive dinner theatrics at LES cocktail den Sons of Essex.Starts next Wednesday. Will be a very, very hot date.First, you’re encouraged to dress the part. Think jazzy. Great chance to buy a hat.Your night begins at an unassuming LES bodega, where a costumed character will give you your “identity” for the evening. These are being kept hush-hush, but we’re hoping for “Reggie Ledoux.”You’ll then present a membership card bearing your moniker to SOE’s deli front for admission to see Madame Lulu’s delights in back.

They’re calling it a “speakeasy bordello,” populated with burlesque danseuses, jazzy chanteuses and green chartreuses.

Plus gypsy psychics, moustachioed piano men and a Dionysian repast of New Orleans grub and cocktails.

Remember your new identity — there’s a strong chance you may need it.

Ain’t it great when history comes to life?

Lulu’s Dove House
at Sons of Essex
133 Essex St.
b/t Stanton and Rivington 

To buy tickets for the next performance, on Wed. Oct. 22, 2014, use the link to eventbrite below:

 

[box] http://www.eventbrite.com/e/lulus-dove-house-event-at-sons-of-essex-tickets-13633463055[/box]

Continue reading

http://news.msn.com/us/wwi-aviation-still-alive-at-aerodrome-in-new-york

WWI aviation still alive at aerodrome in New York

David King pilots a War War I-era Fokker DR-1 reproduction tri-plane during an air show at the Old Rhinebeck Aerodrome on Sunday, July 6, 2014, in Rhinebeck, N.Y.

RHINEBECK, N.Y. (AP) — There’s still a place where buzzing biplanes swoop in pursuit of German triplanes, where pilots in open cockpits let their scarves flutter in the wind.

The sights and sounds of World War I flight are recreated regularly at the Old Rhinebeck Aerodrome in New York‘s Hudson Valley, where an original American Curtiss JN-4H “Jenny” shares the sky with reproductions of a French Spad VII and German Fokkers.

WWI Aviation Still Alive at Aerodrome in NY

WWI Aviation Still Alive at Aerodrome in NY
1:53 Views: 7k AP Online Video

“I get to shoot down a Fokker triplane every Sunday afternoon,” said air show director Chris Bulko, who flew the Spad. “I call it playing with the toys here and sharing them with everybody else, and inviting them into our sandbox.”

The aerodrome 80 miles north of New York City is one of a few places scattered around the world that put on air shows based on World War I, which began July 28, 1914. The attraction also boasts a museum and hangars packed with planes from the dawn of flight up to World War II. But the weekend air shows bring the crowds. Saturday shows highlight the early history of aviation. Sundays are devoted to WWI.

Men dressed in old-time overalls start balky engines with a hard pull down on propellers. Bulko blows kisses to the crowd on takeoff and chases a doppelganger of the Fokker triplane that was piloted by Manfred von Richthofen (a.k.a. the Red Baron). No machine guns here, though pilots show off their skill by flying through falling streams of toilet paper.

Back on the ground, a cartoony melodrama plays out involving Sir Percy Goodfellow, Trudy Truelove and the scheming villains. It’s family entertainment harkening back to a perilous period.

Flying could be deadly for the young pilots, some of whom were teenagers. Planes were wood-framed, fabric-covered and flammable. Enemy pilots attacked with the sun behind them to blind their prey, sometimes amid barrages of anti-aircraft fire. Machine guns jammed. There were no parachutes.

“It’s a dangerous business simply because the planes are not reliable, in many respects. They are also sometimes difficult to fly,” said John H. Morrow Jr., an expert in WWI aviation who teaches history at the University of Georgia.

Many of the planes that made it through war were destroyed as surplus, a big reason why originals are so rare.

Aerodrome founder Cole Palen bought a few old planes in 1951 when a Long Island hangar at the site of Charles Lindbergh’s trans-Atlantic take-off made way for a shopping plaza. Palen collected pre-WWII planes for the rest of his life and reproduced hard-to-find historical planes, usually with original engines.

In 1960, he put on his first air show at an old farm he bought in the Hudson Valley.

Continue reading

Copyright © 2011-2017 Bygone NYC - All Rights Reserved