Tags:

documentation

from NYPL:

The Landmarks of New York: An Illustrated, Comprehensive Record of New York City’s Historic Buildings, with Barbaralee Diamonstein-Spielvogel, chairwoman of New York State Council on the Arts and author of 23 books.

Tuesday, December 6, 2016, 6:30 p.m.

Program Locations:

Fully accessible to wheelchairs
First come, first served

This illustrated lecture showcases New York City’s architectural history and richness, surveying a broad range of styles and building types: colonial farmhouses, Gilded Age mansions, churches, schools, libraries, museums, and the great twentieth-century skyscrapers that are recognized throughout the world.

Events at The New York Public Library may be photographed or recorded. By attending these events, you consent to the use of your image and voice by the Library for all purposes.

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an urban walking guide

Michael B. Helmreich has walked through every neighborhood in Brooklyn, block by block, experiencing the people and places that gives King County its’ legendary appeal.  Join us as he chronicles his journey from Gravesend to Greenpoint lending his insight into the unique character, and characters of the borough.

Wednesday, November 30, 2016 7:00 pm – 8:00 pm
Central Library, Brooklyn Collection

Where

10 Grand Army Plaza
Brooklyn, NY 11238
718.230.2100
Fully accessible
Get directions from Google.

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from The New York Times:

World-Class Photojournalism, at Home in the South Bronx

By JAMES ESTRIN

When Eugene Richards opens his next exhibit, it will not be at a Chelsea gallery or a major Midtown museum. It will be at a location that he much prefers: the Bronx Documentary Center.

It is a fitting location for an exhibition of images of poverty in America from the 1980s. If the show were in downtown Manhattan, he said, the audience “might not be that interested and see it as ‘urban archaeology’,” he said. But at the B.D.C., poverty is not an abstract concept, since it is in Melrose, a South Bronx neighborhood that has been among the country’s poorest urban communities.

“The audience in the Bronx will come in and have a different read to the pictures and many will have a closer relation to them,” Mr. Richards, 72, said.

His exhibit, “Below the Line: Living Poor in America by Eugene Richards,” (slides 1 – 4) on view Oct. 1st through Nov. 6th, marks the fifth anniversary of the B.D.C., an unlikely institution that combines exhibitions of famous and emerging photographers, film screenings, community-based educational programs and free photography workshops intended to create the next generation of documentarians from diverse racial, ethnic and economic backgrounds.

Mr. Richards may be one of the best-known photographers, but he is a fairly solitary figure who is not a member of a collective, or a photo agency. He tends to keep to himself and his family when he is not exhibiting his long-term projects or teaching workshops.

But the B.D.C., where he often speaks with students, is where he finds a much-needed sense of community that reflects the city’s diversity.

“It’s the total opposite of the usual photographic experience,” he said. “It’s like getting into a room full of friends. It’s important to me because it’s the only place I can go in New York that is diverse and where we’re all there to talk about photography and issues. It feels like a homecoming.”

The B.D.C. was born out of long conversations between two close friends, Michael Kamber and Tim Hetherington, both of whom were experienced conflict photographers. They yearned to create a space that would feature the kind of serious, long-term, issue-oriented photography that was anathema to galleries in SoHo and Chelsea, while also educating new visual storytellers.

Mr. Kamber saved money from his many years of covering the Iraq war for The New York Times and purchased a renovated 19th century landmark brick building on 151st Street and Courtlandt Avenue in the Bronx in 2010. Mr. Hetherington, who was also an Oscar-nominated filmmaker, was killed while photographing in Libya four months later.

Mr. Kamber was devastated, but continued to work on the B.D.C., maxing out five credit cards to buy supplies as he and a group of volunteers laid down floors, built walls and installed wiring. Danielle Jackson, who had been in charge of exhibitions at Magnum Photos in New York, helped found the B.D.C.

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The Subway Map: The Last 50 Years, The Next 50 Years

Tuesday, October 27, 2015, 6:00pm – 9:30pm at Cooper Union

Timed to the 111th anniversary of the opening of the New York City subway on October 27, 1904, a group of historians and designers gather for a public symposium focusing on the past and future evolution of one of New York City’s most key graphic works: the subway map. Admission is free, but reservations are requested.

During its first half-century, maps of the subway were based on the three original operating companies (IRT, BMT, IMD). Although the subway was unified in 1940, it was not until 1964 that a new basic design was put forward by R. Raleigh D’Adamo that dispensed with the historical operating companies and introduced the modern nomenclature and color-coding of subway routes. Fifty years ago, in the fall of 1965, the Transit Authority adopted D’Adamo’s design concept. The highlight of the history section of this evening will be the launch of the first digital reconstruction of Raleigh D’Adamo’s highly influential hand-drawn map of 1964, which had been lost until last year. …
Program

  • Introduction by Peter B. Lloyd: Why is the transit map an ‘ínformation design’ problem?
  • Presentation by R. Raleigh D’Adamo on how he created his 1964 map.
  • Presentation by Peter B Lloyd on how the map evolved after 1964.
  • Presentation by John Tauranac: who will show how to make today’s MTA subway map into the MTA subway map of tomorrow
  • Presentation by Eddie Jabbour on present and future transit mapping for mobile devices.
  • Panel discussion on how the subway map should evolve in the future.

RSVP

The event is free but please RSVP. Attendees who RSVP will be rewarded with a postcard print of part of Raleigh D’Adamo’s subway map (the downtown segment). This is a Limited print run of 855, available only to attendees who RSVP on Eventbrite.

Located in The Great Hall, in the Foundation Building, 7 East 7th Street, between Third and Fourth Avenues

     

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From Gothamist: Photos: Revisit The 1929 Wall Street Crash, Which Began 86 Years Ago on 10/24

“On this day, investors traded a record 12,894,650 shares, following a precipitous market decline that kicked off in September. Panic seized Wall Street traders, with photographers capturing crowds gathering outside the New York Stock Exchange and the Sub-Treasury Building, which is now the Federal Hall National Memorial.

Though the stock exchange rallied a bit on Friday, it began crashing again on Monday, eventually leading to Black Tuesday’s total collapse. That collapse truly kicked off the Great Depression—stock market prices didn’t climb back up to pre-crash numbers until 1954. “

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From “New York’s Most Useful Citizen” E-Mail Newsletter from Museum of the City of New York:

Now on View

Jacob A. Riis: Revealing New York’s Other Half

His images still shock – and demand our attention. Through his pioneering photojournalism, Jacob A. Riis illuminated the squalid living conditions of New York City’s poor, from the cellars of Ludlow Street to the barracks of Mott Street at the turn of the 20th century.

Our Riis retrospective opened this week to critical acclaim, and serves as a precursor to Affordable New York: A Housing Legacy, with Riis as one of the city’s early champions of housing reform. His photos, articles, and illustrated lectures of the slums prompted fellow reformer Theodore Roosevelt to call Riis “New York’s most useful citizen.” They also provide a unique lens for viewing New York’s persistent, ongoing struggles with inequality.

This is the first major retrospective of Riis’s photographic work in the U.S. in more than six decades, and for the first time unites his photographs and his archive, which belongs to the Library of Congress and the New York Public Library. Plan your visit.

Riis Photo Collection

Our Jacob A. Riis Collection encompasses more than 1,000 photos and serves as the sole archive of Riis’s images. Browse the collection.

New Book Release
Jacob A. Riis: Revealing New York’s Other Half

The first comprehensive study and complete catalogue of Riis’s world-famous images, curator Bonnie Yochelson’s newly released book places him at the forefront of early-20th-century social reform photography. It is the culmination of more than two decades of research on Riis, assembling materials from five repositories (the Riis Collection at the Museum of the City of New York, the Library of Congress, the New-York Historical Society, the New York Public Library, and the Museum of South West Jutland, Denmark) as well as previously unpublished photographs and notes.Price: $65
Members save 20%

Upcoming Jacob A. Riis Public Programs

Examining Urban Poverty Today, A Century after Riis

Weds., Nov. 4, 6:30 pm

Join us for a panel exploring the legacy of Riis’s journalism and photography on the work of contemporary activists committed to raising public consciousness about urban poverty. Panelists include historian and Riis expert Daniel Czitrom leads a discussion with New York Times journalist Andrea Elliott, Mark Levitan, formerly of the Center for Economic Opportunity, Nancy Wackstein of United Neighborhood Houses, and historian Craig Steven Wilder.
Tickets: FREE for members, $12 & up for all others

Danish Modernity: Jacob Riis and Vilhelm Hammershøi in 1900

Mon., November 16, 6:30 pm

Join two art historians and experts on Riis and Hammershøi, Bonnie Yochelson (exhibition curator) and Thor Mednick, for an exploration of their work. After their presentations, Danish Ambassador Anne Dorte Riggelson will lead a conversation about Riis and Hammershoi’s contrasting lives and perspectives.
Tickets: FREE for members, $12 & up for all others

A Victorian Christmas Magic-Lantern Show with the American Magic-Lantern Theater

Sun., Dec. 6, 3:00 pm

Celebrate this holiday season with a magic lantern performance – a technique used by Jacob Riis – that features Hans Christian Anderson’s famous Christmas story, “The Little Match Girl,” and holiday carols like “O Holy Night.” Perfect for families with kids ages 6 and up.

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New York Transit Museum hosts an exhibition celebrating the Verrazano Bridge’s 50th anniversary. Attractions include a timeline of the bridge’s construction, documentation and first-person perspectives of the construction, and notes and sketches from Robert Moses’ office. 10 am–4 pm. Friday, June 19th.

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