Tags:

exhibitions

At Museum of the City of New York

1220 Fifth Ave at 103rd St., Open Daily 10am–6pm

Back to Exhibitions

From frozen ponds to Madison Square Garden, ice-skating has become a quintessentially New York pastime, woven into the city’s urban fabric in ways large and small.

New York on Ice: Skating in the City invites visitors to explore how ice-skating evolved in the city from its colonial Dutch and British origins to become a 19th-century craze, and later an opportunity for elaborate spectacle, commercialized leisure, and competitive sport in the 20th century and beyond. Along the way, skating has left its mark on New York’s urban landscape, from the design of Central Park, to intimate hotel rinks and extravagant arenas, to a plethora of skating facilities that today define and transform parks and other public spaces across the city.

The story of New York on Ice will be told through vintage photographs, posters, lithographs, paintings, and costumes. Together they reveal the evolution of the sport and art of ice-skating in the city both as a window into a passion and pastime of generations of New Yorkers, and as an unexpected ingredient of urban place-making.

Continue reading

By LUCAS MAUTNER
The Joyce B. Cowin Women’s History Gallery
opened recently with an event to honor Cowin’s
contribution to the New York Historical Society.
Louise Mirrer, President, opened with a few
remarks. “I’m really delighted to see so many
of you at this wonderful celebration…and I am
also delighted to welcome you to the Saving
Washington exhibition,” she said.
The Saving Washington exhibition allows
visitors to look at the early days of the United
States through the eyes of the women of
the period. Books, letters, clothing, and other
important artifacts will be on display to the
public, part of a collection of over 150 objects.
“Saving Washington upends the familiar
narrative of our American founding as a power
struggle among men, offering the story of Dolly
Madison, and women of the early republic
more generally, as an example of how women’s
critical but often behind-the-scenes work gave
rise to the nation’s capital as a beacon for the
world,” Mirrer said.
Cowin, addressing the crowd with audible
emotion and pride, said, “In the end, after seeing
all these exceptional persons of our country—
who propelled us ahead—I strongly believe it is
we the people who try to help each other if we
can. We go forward—we build buildings—cre-
ate schools—support hospitals—we the people
go forward. Each of us will have a major trag-
edy in our lives. We mourn, we remember, and
we go forward. We follow the rules, and some
of us make the rules in the end. But it is we the
people that are the driving force of this great
country; we the people go forward.”
Saving Washington is housed in the new
Joyce B. Cowin Women’s History Gallery, in
the newly renovated fourth floor. Its doors will
open fully to the public in late April, where it
will host several programs, from conferences to
writing workshops to panel discussions. Some
of the upcoming events include an unveiling
of the personal archives of Billie Jean King
and a discussion about “Women and the White
House” moderated by 60 Minutes correspon-
dent Lesley Stahl. #
Joyce B. Cowin, an alumna of Teachers
College, Columbia University, is a philan-
thropist and founder of the Cowin Financial
Literacy Project, which aims to improve finan-
cial literacy among students.…

Continue reading

-Event Passed-

from CityLimits.org:

April 29 @ 11:00 am5:00 pm

South Street Seaport Museum celebrates its 50th Anniversary

The South Street Seaport Museum, situated in the original port that built New York into the city it is today, will celebrate fifty years this year! The Seaport Museum invites the city to join in the celebration of this important milestone, which will be recognized over an entire year (April 2017-April 2018) of special programming and exhibitions. …

April 2017 marks fifty years since the Museum received its charter from the New York State Department of Education Board of Regents. Over that fifty years the Museum has grown dramatically, collecting artifacts and works of art documenting the rise of New York as a port city.; developing and implementing innovative and award-winning programming; mounting exhibitions; and preserving a fleet of historic ships on the East River. Despite three massive setbacks: the 9/11 attacks, the Great Recession of 2008, and the floodwaters of hurricane Sandy, the museum is growing once again. With support from New York City and a dedicated group of staff, volunteers, members and friends, the Seaport Museum remains an educational and cultural gem in lower Manhattan.

The Seaport Museum’s 50th anniversary will be marked throughout the year with the opening of new exhibitions, including Millions: Migrants and Millionaires aboard the Great Liners, 1900-1914 (opening June 2017), artistic and musical performances, lectures and book talks, walking tours, and a formal 50th anniversary cocktail reception aboard the 1885 ship Wavertree in September.

Capt. Jonathan Boulware, Executive Director of the Museum, spoke enthusiastically about the anniversary. “It’s a great privilege to celebrate the five-decade life of this vital institution. We’re here in the original fabric of old New York, the ships, the piers, the 19th-century buildings. It’s the history of New York, but the topics we cover are still highly relevant today. The original values that made New York what it is, the Dutch values of trade and tolerance, the New York values of immigration, of multiculturalism, and of ambition, these all touch on urgent issues of New York and America today. Indeed, as we celebrate this important anniversary, we’re also celebrating the very best of New York values, past, present, and future.”

A brief history of the Seaport Museum:
The Museum proper is housed several buildings known collectively as Schermerhorn Row, but when completed in 1812, Schermerhorn Row was, in many respects, the city’s first world trade center. The Row housed a series of counting houses where merchants bought and sold coffee, tea, cotton, molasses, and countless other trade goods from around the world. South Street was nicknamed ‘the Street of Ships’ for the countless sailing ships that docked there, linking the city with some of the most important centers of trade in Europe, the Caribbean, South America, California, and China. The commercial activity along South Street had by the mid-nineteenth century transformed New York from a former British colonial outpost, into the largest city in the United States that controlled half the country’s trade.

Continue reading

On View April 7–August 20, 2017

The first major museum exhibition to focus on American taste during the creative explosion of the 1920s,The Jazz Age will be a multi-media experience of more than 400  examples of interior design, industrial design, decorative art, jewelry, fashion, architecture, music, and film. Giving full expression to the decade’s diversity and dynamism, The Jazz Age will define the American spirit of the period. Find out more.

The Jazz Age: American Style in the 1920s is co-organized by Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum and the Cleveland Museum of Art.

Supporters

The Jazz Age: American Style in the 1920s is made possible by the generous support of Madeleine K. Rudin and Grant S. Johnson in memory of Jack Rudin.

Additional major support is provided by Amita and Purnendu Chatterjee, Robert and Helen Appel, Helen and Edward Hintz, and the Secretary of the Smithsonian and the Smithsonian National Board. Funding is also provided by the August Heckscher Exhibition Fund, The Masinter Family Foundation, Shelby and Frederick Gans, Marlene Nathan Meyerson Family Foundation, Ehrenkranz Fund, Esme Usdan Exhibition Endowment Fund, Siegelson, New York, Cooper Hewitt Master’s Program Fund, Karen and Joe Levine, and The Felicia Fund.

Jeweled Splendors of the art deco era: the prince and princess sadruddin aga khan collection

PantherVanityCase

On view April 7–August 27, 2017

Over 100 extraordinary examples of cigarette and vanity cases, compacts, clocks and timepieces, and other luxury objects will be installed in the Teak Room, including exquisite works from the premier jewelry houses of Europe and America. Personal gifts from Prince Sadruddin Aga Khan (1933–2003) to his wife, Catherine (b. 1938), the collection was amassed over three decades and displays the excitement, innovation and creativity of the art deco era at its most luxurious.

Opening Party

Celebrate the opening of The Jazz Age and be the first to see the exhibition! Become a member today.

Featured Image: Egyptian Bracelet, ca. 1925; Produced by Lacloche Frères (Paris, France); Diamonds, turquoise, sapphires, mother-of-pearl, onyx, black pearls, smoky quartz, tourmaline, gold, platinum; 17.9 x 4 cm (7 1/16 x 1 9/16 in.); Private Collection; Photo Credit: Matt Flynn

Continue reading

from The West Side Rag:

ENJOY A WEEKEND OF INTERDISCIPLINARY PROGRAMMING WITH THE BARD GRADUATE CENTER FOCUS FESTIVAL

SPONSORED

Focus Festival

Bard Graduate Center’s inaugural Focus Festival, April 8-9, 2017, brings thinkers and artists together for a weekend of interdisciplinary programming that draws inspiration from the key themes of our two spring Focus Project exhibitions: Design by the Book: Chinese Ritual Objects and the Sanli tu and  New York Crystal Palace 1853.

Claudia Rankine, 2016 MacArthur Fellow, poet, and essayist, will join Garnette Cadogan, essayist, in the keynote conversation “Ways of Seeing the City” on April 8 at 7 pm. Additional programs include a talk by Michael Puett, author of the New York Times bestseller The Path (April 9, 5 pm); walking tours of the Seneca Village site in Central Park with archaeologist Cynthia Copeland (April 8, 3 pm) and “Branding Fifth Avenue & the Other NY” with Jack Tchen, co-founder of the Museum of Chinese in America (April 9, 12 pm); and performances of Aaron Landsman’s critically acclaimed Love Story, a theatrical piece about a disappearing city, two people navigating it, and a fidgety, obsessive follower (April 8, 5:30 pm and April 9, 3:30 pm). Curators will offer spotlight tours of the exhibitions (April 8 and 9, 12 pm). Family-friendly workshops will be a special treat for kids (April 8 and 9, 1 pm).

For information, tickets, and the full schedule of events, click here.

Wendy’s Subway Reading Room
In conjunction Focus Project exhibitions, Brooklyn-based literary organization Wendy’s Subway has curated a Reading Room in the ground floor of the Gallery at 18 West 86 Street.

Wendy’s Subway Reading Room at Bard Graduate Center promotes engagement with artists’ books, periodicals, and other publications selected for their relationship to the spring exhibitions and public programming. A series of readings and writing workshops that gather together some of the boldest voices from poetry, literature, and performance will accompany the installation. Over the course of the installation, visitors are invited to drop off books they would like included in the Reading Room. Admission to the reading room is free, as is the wifi. It will be open during all public hours. Book suggestions may also be offered via a feedback box in the Gallery.

Wendy’s Subway launches the first of its monthly Reading Series on April 26 with an evening reading of works by Layli Longsoldier, Julian Talamantez Brolaski, and Wendy Xu. Read more.

Continue reading

From a facebook posting by Michael Cala:
“I’m very pleased, as a first-time applicant, to announce that I was just awarded a sizable grant from Staten Island Arts to mount an exhibition of my vintage Coney Island photographs (1970-1980). The exhibition will hopefully take place some time in mid-2017. Got some great people on board to help with printing and mounting. And the initial exhibit will be held at the Garibaldi-Meucci Museum.” …

Continue reading

At The Merchant’s House Museum:

All exhibitions are included with regular admission.

OPENS Friday, November 25, through Monday, January 9
Exhibition –
Christmas Comes to Old New York: Holiday Traditions of the Tredwell Family

Scenes of holiday preparation recreated in the period rooms throughout the house show how many of our modern holiday traditions originated in mid-19th century New York. From table-top Christmas trees decorated with candles and handmade ornaments, to poinsettias and evergreens decking the halls, Christmas songs and carols, presents and stockings. And, of course, Santa Claus. On display, rarely exhibited Christmas presents from the Tredwell collection.

 …

Continue reading

from Bowery Boogie: “Windows on the Bowery”:

Posted on: July 5th, 2016 at 5:14 am by

windows-bowery-tattoo

It’s high time the Bowery receives its due and proper. Grassroots preservationists at the Bowery Alliance of Neighbors implore you to stop, observe, and appreciate the former Native American footpath and onetime boulevard of broken dreams. “Windows on the Bowery,” their new visual walking exhibit, premieres today.

The ambitious undertaking essentially serves as a portal to the rich cultural significance of the Bowery. It’s a creative effort some three years in the making that “highlights remarkable people, events, buildings, and achievements associated with particular addresses” along the Bowery. The ultimate goal is awareness that might help ebb the tide of destruction we’ve seen here in recent years. You see, the thoroughfare is not landmarked, even though it’s recognized on the National Register of Historic Places.

As previously reported, poster-sized placards rife with location-based information will reside in their respective Bowery windows, from Chatham to Cooper Square. Each one being a window into the past. (Get it?) In total, there are sixty-four panels (18×24 inches) containing histories penned by eighteen notable historians and researchers (Eric Ferrara, Joyce Mendelsohn, Dan Barry, Kerri Culhane, et al). Hundreds of historical images are also included.

But there’s more. In addition to the display at the Bowery locations, a full exhibition of all the posters is planned for the western windows of the Cooper Union building, as well as inside the landmark HSBC bank branch at 58 Bowery.

We’re told that the project should remain in place for several months, at least.

Save

Save

Continue reading

Opens November 18, 2016

Peter Stuyvesant to Boss Tweed. Alexander Hamilton to Jackie Robinson. Fiorello LaGuardia to Emma Goldman. Jane Jacobs to Jay-Z. Among so many other big personalities, famous and not, the energies of New Yorkers like these have driven the city to become a subject of fascination the world over. They’re some of the many people you’ll encounter in New York at Its Core, an exhibition five years in the making, which will interpret and present the compelling story of our city’s rise from a thriving Dutch village to today’s post-WWII “Capital of the World.” In addition to exploring four centuries of New York’s history, the exhibition also delves into the challenges and opportunities the “city that never sleeps” faces in the future.

More than 400 objects, many from our rich collection, will complement state-of-the-art interactives in three galleries, occupying the Museum’s entire first floor. The stories presented within the galleries, entitled Port City, 1609–1898, World City, 1898–2012, and Future City Lab, are shaped by four themes – money, density, diversity and creativity. Taken together, these forces provide a lens for examining the character of the city throughout its history and into a changing world.

“An exhibit of this scope — three full galleries devoted to New York City’s past, present and future — doesn’t exist anywhere else in the city,” said Ronay Menschel Director Whitney W. Donhauser, in a feature just published in The New York Times. More details here.

Museum of the City of New York

1220 Fifth Ave

New York, NY 10029

Continue reading

The Andrew Freedman Home is pleased to announce its inaugural AFH Open House on Saturday, March 5th, 2016 from Noon to Midnight.

Join us for an amazing art and culture filled day with exhibitions, film screenings, open artist studios, special guests, live music, and performances that celebrate the vibrancy and diversity of The Andrew Freedman Home and its commitment to quality arts and culture events and programs in the Bronx.

Opening at Noon, The Andrew Freedman Home invites the public to view the various arts and culture programs that take place in this landmarked Grand Concourse mansion in the heart of the South Bronx.  During the day, The AFH Historical Tour lead by AFH staff and artists allows visitors to see the amazing architecture and grandeur of this 100,000 sq ft building that houses two exhibition spaces, 18 artist studios, including WAFH—our newly launched radio station—and a 100-seat theater and performance space.  Artists will be working on projects and works in progress throughout the day around the grounds of AFH and in their studios, all on view and all open to the public.

 

Evening brings a trio of film screenings Beginning at 4:30pm, The Great Gatsby (2013) directed by Baz Lurhmann will be screened in our Grand Ballroom followed by Nothing Happened & Middle Passage, two short films that address the perception of race and identity in the contemporary American consciousness.  Seating is limited and on a first come, first serve basis.

Beginning at 7pflyerfront air IIIm, AFH will host a reception for 4 exhibitions debuting that evening.

Apache Line:  III Annual Artists in Residence Exhibition curated by Walter Puryear features work that draws from the tradition of gang initiation during the 60’s and 70’s, to explore the economic hazing process of gentrification and how it impacts neighborhoods:  geographically, socially, financially and demographically.  Artists include Melissa Calderón, Xavier Figueroa, Gasa, Josué Guarionex, DJ Kool Herc, Valarie Irizarry, Aaron “SpazeCraft” Lazansky-Olivas, Jose “Dr. Drum” Ortiz, Andre Trenier, Natalie C. Wood and Meguru Yamaguchi.

The Bronx Speaks:  Our Home, an exhibition organized in conjunction with The Bronx Arts Alliance (BxAA) for NY Armory Week, is intended to function as a platform for artists to “speak,” amplifying multiple voices and perspectives.  It features the works of over 20 Bronx artists and is curated by Sarah Corona.

Undesign the Redline organized by designing the WE is a pop-up exhibition that exposes dtwimagethe history of Redlining, its lingering effect, and collective actions communities can take to build a new social and economic ecosystem that breaks its destructive bounds.  This exhibition will be on view throughout the 1st floor hallways of AFH.

Bronx Voyeurs, an exhibition featuring the work of artists projected from the windows of AFH, will focus on the work of Bronx artists addressing themes that are relevant to our borough.  13 artists will project their work from the 2nd and 3rd floor windows of AFH, presenting a collage of images and video to be viewed from the Lawn and Grand Concourse during the month of March.…

Continue reading

Copyright © 2011-2017 Bygone NYC - All Rights Reserved