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Those Quirky Victorians
Learn About Those Quirky Victorians At A Free Public Lecture At Sotheby’s
570 Lexington Avenue 6th floor |
Tuesday, November 28th, 2017
7:00PM – 8:30PM

Sotheby’s Institute of Art Speaker Series Presents

Those Quirky Victorians: Re-purposed Traditions Through 21st Century Art,

 

Design and Science

 

The Victorian era was a time fertile in essential technological inventions, means of communication and artistic design. In the name of science, discovery,  amusement and financial gain Victorians collected profusely.  Parallel to the idea of progress was the reality of quirky hobbies, impractical contraptions and obsessive interests.

This panel aims to shed a light on a selection of impactful Victorian developments, namely the marriage of science and art in the reproduction of historical artifacts, the expansion of  landscape gardens as a reflection of urban necessity and the compulsion to craft individual identities through pictorial representation.

Panelists:

  • John D. Ward, Senior Vice President, Head of Silver Department, Sotheby’s
  • Barbara Frelinghuysen Israel, Owner, Barbara Israel Garden Antiques
  • Tim Hamilton, Generalist Appraiser, Gurr Johns

 

Moderator: Ann-Marie Richard, Director, MA Fine and Decorative Art and Design, Sotheby’s Institute of Art-NY

John D. Ward, Senior Vice President, Head of Silver Department, Sotheby’s

“The Department of Science and Art: Elkington reproductions of Silver Treasures”

John D. Ward joined Sotheby’s in 1997 and has presided over the strong slate of single-owner and various-owners Silver sales the company has offered in New York.Mr Ward presided over the Charles L Poor sale of Early English Silver, the Jaime Ortiz-Patiño sales of Lamerie and English Chinoiserie Silver, The Jeffords Collection of Early American Silver, The Bluhdorn Collection of Important English Silver and Silver-gilt, and the Thyssen Meissonnier Tureen, the second-highest price ever paid for Silver at auction. He also catalogued the English Silver of the Royal House of Hanover when that was offered in Germany in 2005. Mr Ward has placed works with the Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Gilbert Collection, Winterthur and other major institutions in Boston, Chicago, St Louis, Dallas, Houston, Baltimore, Los Angeles County and the British National Trust.  Mr Ward has a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Chicago and a Master’s degree in the History of Decorative Arts from the Bard Graduate Center for Studies in the Decorative Arts, New York.

 

Barbara Frelinghuysen Israel, Owner, Barbara Israel Garden Antiques

“Victorian Taste: Cemeteries, Botanicals and Overcrowded Gardens”

Barbara Frelinghuysen Israel founded Barbara Israel Garden Antiques in 1985, after a serendipitous purchase of a large collection of estate statuary lead her down the garden antiques path. Now in her 32st year in business, Barbara is recognized as an authority on the subject. Barbara’s exhaustively researched book, Antique Garden Ornament: Two Centuries of American Taste (1999), is the definitive work in the field. She is also the author of A Guide to Buying Antique Garden Ornament (2012), a user-friendly handbook packed with tips on conservation, identification and more.

As a dealer, Barbara collects the finest examples of garden ornament, guided by her appreciation for classical forms and her love of unusual, once-in-a-lifetime finds.

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Thursday Oct 19, 2017
7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

POWERHOUSE @ the Archway
28 Adams Street (Corner of Adams & Water Street @ the Archway)
Brooklyn , NY 11201

powerHouse Book Launch: STREET: New York City – 70s, 80s, 90s by Carrie Boretz — in conversation w/ Mark Bussell

 

RSVP appreciated:

Please fill out the “Bookings” form at the bottom of this page.

-or-

Send the name of the event and number of attendees to our RSVP email.
*Disregard the notification that will appear after Booking.*

PLEASE NOTE: Submitting an RSVP for this event DOES NOT guarantee entrance. This is a free-access event — entrance will be on a first-come, first-served basis.


 

About the Book:

The photographs in Street were taken by Carrie Boretz in New York City from the mid 1970s through the 1990s. It is common knowledge that the city was on rocky ground for many of those years but these are not pictures filled with drama or strife. Instead Boretz was always more interested in the subtle and familiar moments of everyday life in the various neighborhoods where she lived, before much of the graffiti was scrubbed away and the city sanitized and reborn to what it has since become.

For so many living in and visiting New York today, it is forgotten or altogether not known how different so many parts of the city were during that time. Many of these pictures show the reality of the streets then, where every day workers, the homeless, the affluent, and tourists all shared the common space, providing examples of how one of the greatest cities in the world was one often filled with contradictions. But there is also a timeless element to these images as children still play in the parks, streets, and schoolyards, commuters still face the elements daily as they wait, there are still regular demonstrations and parades, and the whole spectrum of the joys and pitfalls of humanity are still visible most anywhere a person looks.

For Boretz nothing was scripted, it all played out right before her. As Patti Smith said, “You need no rationale, no schooling. It’s love at first sight. You see something and you have to capture it. Instinctive, bang, you feel one with it.” Indeed, Boretz doesn’t have a philosophy about shooting other than trusting her instinct: she saw, she shot, she moved on, always looking for moments that made her heart beat faster. It was the continual rush of knowing that at any time she could come upon something real and beautiful. That is why and how she shot and why and how her Street is so special.

 

About the Photographer:

After graduating in 1975 from Washington University in St. Louis Carrie Boretz began her life as a New York City photographer a week later, landing an internship at the Village Voice. Over the next decade she photographed for The New York Times MagazineNew YorkSports Illustrated, People, Fortune, and Life. By the 1990s she was shooting almost daily for the New York Times‘s “Day” beat, one picture that revealed a slice of the city on that particular day.…

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Sat, October 14th, 2017 |

11:00 am to 4:00 pm

Free with Museum Admission
Recommended for all ages

On October 14, 1781, Lieutenant Colonel Alexander Hamilton made his famous charge to capture Redoubt Ten in the Battle of Yorktown. Come to the Museum ready with your questions for Hamilton! Portrayed by a Living Historian, Lt. Col. Hamilton tells you how he helped win the climactic campaign of the Revolutionary War. Don’t miss your chance to learn a military drill from the War for Independence under the instruction of Hamilton himself!

We’re celebrating Hamilton’s military career with Living History all weekend. Join us on Sunday to meet the New York City militia that Hamilton joined while he was still in school!


Living History Days at N-YHS
Living History: Hamilton’s Militia, Now Recruiting!
Sunday, October 15th, 2017 | 11:00 am – 4:00 pm

Free with Museum Admission
Recommended for all ages

Immerse yourself in the independent militia company that started Hamilton’s military career! Meet the Hearts of Oak, a troop of Living Historians who portray the group of young volunteers that came together in colonial New-York on the eve of the American Revolution in 1775. Some members of the militia, like Hamilton, were students at King’s College—known today as Columbia University! Take a close look at their distinctive green coats, listen to fife and drum music, and experience a military drill.

We’re celebrating Hamilton’s military career with Living History all weekend. On Saturdaymeet Lieutenant Colonel Alexander Hamilton and learn about his victory at the Battle of Yorktown that happened on this weekend in 1781!

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Howl Happening Opening Night Sept. 10th

Sep. 10 – Oct. 06, 2017
56 Bleecker Gallery and Late 80s New York
Presented by Some Serious Business
and Howl! Happening: An Arturo Vega Project

Lust of glory pricked their hearts up, dread of shame
Struck them tame;
And that glory and that shame alike, the gold
Bought and sold.
-Robert Browning, Love Among The Ruins

Let’s also say that change is neither good or bad. It simply is. It can be greeted with terror or joy. A tantrum that says, ‘I want it the way it was’ or a dance that says, ‘Look, it’s something new.’
–Don Draper, Mad Men (AMC)

Some Serious Business and Howl! Happening are pleased to present Love Among The Ruins, co-curated by Susan Martin, founding director of Some Serious Business; Bill Stelling, 56 Bleecker gallery director and founder of the groundbreaking FUN Gallery with Patti Astor; and artist Maynard Monrow. All three curators were close friends of Dean Rolston, co-owner of 56 Bleecker who serves as inspiration for the exhibition.

Artists in this retrospective include:
Austė, Suzanne Anker, Donald Baechler, Sylvie Ball, Jean-Michel Basquiat, Julian Beck, Bill Beckley, Mike Berg, John Bowman, Jeff Carpenter, Stefano Castronovo, George Condo, Arch Connelly, Bruce Conner, Scott Covert, Ingrid Dinter, Arnold Fern, Vincent Gallo, Graham Gillmore, Allen Ginsberg, Nan Goldin, Eric Goode, Robert Hawkins, Roberto Juarez, Scott Kilgour, Ruth Kligman, Norman Korpi, Joyce Kozloff, Tseng Kwong Chi, David LaChapelle, Greer Lankton, Claire Lieberman, Daniel Mahoney, Frank Majore, Fidel Márquez, Sylvia Martins, McDermott & McGough, Taylor Mead, Nicholas Mouffarrege, David Nelson, Felix Pène du Bois, Jeff Perrone, Elizabeth Peyton, William Rand, Elaine Reicheck, Rene Ricard, Bill Rice, Alexis Rockman, Nicolas Rule, Vittorio Scarpati, Bruno Schmidt, Jo Shane, Mark Sink, Stephen Sprouse, Ken Tisa, Noel Vietor, William Wegman, Dondi White, Martin Wong, Thomas Woodruff, and Jimmy Wright.

56 Bleecker Gallery held a unique position in the late 80’s art world. Part serious gallery, part happening, the space was a scene that reflected the explosive intersection of art, performance, music, fashion and the incredible nightlife culture of that era.

Featuring many of the most cutting edge artists of the time, such as Stephen Sprouse and David LaChapelle, it also presented rigorously serious shows of artists like Bruce Conner and Elaine Reichek. The space was a forum for nightclub impresario Eric Goode to produce an installation that was a window into his future endeavors. Taylor Mead directed the gallery’s historic performance of Jackie Curtis’ Glamour, Glory and Gold featuring legendary actors Ondine, John Heys, Penny Arcade, Harry Koutoukas and Margot Howard-Howard.

56 Bleecker was a ‘scene’ as much as a venue for art. Openings featured guests as diverse as Stavros Niarchos, Richard Gere, Lauren Hutton, Fab 5 Freddy and Henry Geldzahler. Rene Ricard held court in the famous ‘Tin Room,’ anointing those in favor and banishing his enemies to NoHo Star.

While it was a time of enormous creativity, it was also one of deep sorrow. The exhibition will touch upon the impact of AIDS on our community.

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In their special section “Summer Fun in Staten Island,” published on June 28, 2017, the New York Daily News said that our monthly Sea Shanty Sessions, led by the Folk Music Society of New York, offer “…a great opportunity to experience authentic, time-honored maritime songs in an appropriately historic setting.” The next session is this Sunday, August 20, from 2 to 5 PM. This even is family friendly and free, but we always appreciate your donations. #NYCulture

Image may contain: 8 people, people smiling

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Capturing the Lower East Side’s Disappearing Mom-and-Pop Storefronts, a photography and oral history exhibition, opens tonight, 6pm, at Theater For The New City Gallery, 155 1st Ave [10th]. It’s curated by James and Karla Murray, the husband-and-wife photography team that have documented so many mom-and pop-storefronts, compiled in their books Store Front: The Disappearing Face of New York and its followup.

The show is intended to raise awareness of the essential NYC character that these businesses embody, threatened by skyrocketing rents. You’ll see the work of 30 photographers who participated in two workshops in April and June with the Murrays focusing on neighborhood stores. Since the workshops took place, two of the stores photographed by participants have closed.

The event is free and there will be complimentary wine and beer, as well as small bites, provided by local indie merchants, of course.…

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Uptown Bounce: Icons of the ’80s
Wednesday, August 2, 6:00 pmCelebrate the decade when hair was big, fashion was bold, and pop superstars reigned in this tribute to late great musical legends Whitney Houston, David Bowie, and George Michael. Enjoy cocktails* and dancing out on the Terrace, and tour the Museum’s exhibitions after hours.This event is free and open to the public but pre-registration is required. Includes Museum admission.
Sign Up

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sat 5pm: take in the view of the manhattan skyline as participants (maybe
you?) sound their own barbaric yawp during the 13th annual marathon
reading of walt whitman’s ‘song of myself.’ brooklyn bridge park’s granite
prospect, free.

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In the history of the hot dog and its Coney Island connection, Feltman’s preceded Nathan’s, and in a surprise turn of events, modern-day entrepreneurs have revived the brand after 63 years of dormancy, brought back a restaurant location to Surf Avenue (not sure if it is on or just near the original location), and have recreated a type of hot dog similar to what was served by Feltman’s back in the day.

From The Coney Island Blog:

…Feltman’s of Coney Island officially returns to it’s original location after 63 years by giving away 150 free hot dogs!  150 represents the years since German immigrant Charles Feltman invented the hot dog at Coney Island, NY.

A press conference will be taking place outside Luna Park at 11:45am. At 12pm the first 150 people on line will receive one free original hot dog courtesy of Feltman’s of Coney Island. By Memorial Day the Surf Ave location will be adorned with new signage inside and out. The new Surf Ave. location will be operating during the same hours as Luna Park. Valerio Ferrari President of C.A.I. and Luna Park says” we are thrilled to bring a part of Coney Island history to Luna Park as it’s the perfect fit.”

In 1867 Charles Feltman invented the hot dog at Coney Island. By the 1870’s Feltman’s Oceanside Pavilion was the largest restaurant in the world! In 1915 Nathan Handwerker was a bun slicer at Feltman’s Restaurant before opening his own hot dog spot down the block selling a tasty but smaller knockoff of Feltman’s original at half the price. Now you have the opportunity to enjoy the mother of all hot dogs! The original! Feltman’s of Coney Island hot dogs are all natural with an “Old World” German spice blend and no nitrates added in lamb casing. They have an incredible snap!

 

 

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Hot Dog inventor Charles Feltman

Feltman’s has a location at 80 St. Mark’s Place in the East Village. Feltman’s hot dogs are sold in Brooklyn at Brenman’s Meat Market and the Beach Deli both on Gerritsen Ave. In Queens at Deirdre Maeve’s Market in Breezy Point. Feltman’s hot dogs may be shipped across the country via the online store FeltmansofConeyIsland.com.

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@NY Post

Just last week Feltman’s hot dogs were added to the menu at Mc Sorley’s Old Ale House in Manhattan. The first time the historic tavern has altered the menu in over 50 years! Mikey’s Burgers on Ludlow St. on the Lower East Side also carries the iconic franks.

Feltman’s biggest fan is most likely eating Champ Kobayashi who can occasionally be found at Feltman’s Kitchen (East Village) at 80 St. Mark’s Place in the East Village scarfing down a Feltman’s original or an Al Capone Hot Dog named after the famous mobster who would frequently fill his belly at Feltman’s. Kobayashi said eating Feltman’s hot dogs is “as good as eating steak!”

So come celebrate Feltman’s long awaited return with a free hot dog as well as the 90th anniversary of the Cyclone Rollercoaster on Memorial Day.

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