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Greenwich Village

Come in, come in! Enter into the spectral shadows of St. John’s Sanctuary which has sat quietly for 190 years in the heart of historical Greenwich Village. But, now…lit by flickering candlelight, bathed in ghostly mist, the players at the award-winning, critically-acclaimed Radiotheatre hope to chill the marrow in your bones as they celebrate the High Holy Days of HALLOWEEN with its 9th Annual H.P. LOVECRAFT FESTIVAL…teeming with very special denizens of its own, 
so rich in bloodcurdling variety that the heart thuds loudly, sweat breaks and the cringing mind searches shudderingly 
for the next ghastly manifestation in this terrifying feast of fiendish delights! All live, onstage complete with our fabulous cast, original orchestral scores and a plethora of sound FX 
in our ongoing tribute to the Grandmaster of 20th Century American Horror himself, H.P. LOVECRAFT(1890-1937.) 
St. John’s Sanctuary    81 Christopher St.  NYC  
Off 7th Ave.  #1 train Sheridan Sq.  All W4th St Trains
THE STORIES

HERBERT WEST, REANIMATOR – A Lovecraft classic!  A mad doctor’s assistant recalls their efforts to resurrect the dead!

THE SHADOW OVER INNSMOUTH – A young man visits the seedy New England seaport of Innsmouth where he finds a strange breed of inhabitants. 

THE HORROR AT RED HOOK – A NYC cop uncovers a terrible cult alive in Brooklyn, but no one believes him!

THE EVIL CLERGYMAN – A man finds himself in an eerie attic with a Satanic past.

THE THING ON THE DOORSTEP – A man marries a weird woman whom he claims has possessed him body and soul!

HYPNOS – A female sculptor spends years with her mate sharing drug induced dreams where they travel to a place called Hypnos.

DAGON – A shipwrecked man discovers an island of strange beings who worship ancient gods.  After he is rescued, they pursue him. 

THE TRANSITION OF JUAN ROMERO – A gold mine explodes leaving a fathomless abyss into which a miner and his Mexican friend enter! 

THE STATEMENT OF RANDOLPH CARTER – Two scientists explore the frightening world beneath an old cemetery!


CALENDAR OF SHOWS   ALL SHOWS @  8 PM

10/19-  REANIMATOR; EVIL CLERGYMAN

10/20 – THING ON DOORSTEP; HORROR AT RED HOOK

10/21 – SHADOW OVER INNSMOUTH; HYPNOS

10/25 – DAGON; STATEMENT; HYPNOS; EVIL CLERGYMAN

10/28 – REANIMATOR; EVIL CLERGYMAN

10/29 – INSMOUTH; HORROR AT RED HOOK

10/30 – REANIMATOR; TRANSITION

11/1 –   INNSMOUTH; HYPNOS

11/3 –   THING ON DOORSTEP; HORROR AT RED HOOK

11/4 –   REANIMATOR; EVIL CLERGYMAN 

11/5 –   DAGON; STATEMENT; EVIL CLERGYMAN; HYPNOS
SMARTTIX.COM  212 – 868-4444
WRITTEN/DIRECTED/MUSIC 
BY DAN BIANCHI
SOUND DESIGN- DAN BIANCHI/ WES SHIPPEE
CAST: FRANK ZILINYI; R.PATRICK ALBERTY; 
ALEJANDRO CARDOZO; CAITLIN BOYLE
“THE GREATEST PRACTIONER OF HORROR IN THE 20th CENTURY!”   STEPHEN KING

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Wednesday, July 8, 2015

MANHATTAN – 35 Cooper Square

Gone. 35 Cooper Square.  Was one of the oldest Federal-style houses on the Bowery.

In its day, the house, now known as 35 Cooper Square, was nestled among three similar dormer-roof structures. Today it resembles a pink mushroom, propped up against the towering glass and steel sequoia that is the Cooper Square Hotel.

The New York Times

Link – #35 Cooper Square

I didn’t get lazy.  I just discovered that someone had a better blog entry than the one I was working on.  🙂  In Mr. Moss’ blog, a man is said to have hanged himself in the attic, however I can find only anecdotal information about this “man.”  Could he be the unknown man who died at this address in 1903 with $0.42 to his name?

#35 (AKA #391 Bowery) is no longer standing, but the energy may well be there.

35 Cooper Square is now a 13-story dormitory building.

Known Residents
1815 — Samuel WIGTON
Longworth’s American Almanack, New-York Register, and City Directory, 1815.

1825-1827 — Built by Nicholas William STUYVESANT, great-grandson of Peter Stuyvesant. 

c. 1825 — John and Mary WOOD. 
www.nytimes.com/2011/02/19/nyregion/19metjournal.html?ref=nyregion&_r=0 

1837 — William D. DISBROW, sexton of St. Mark’s Church in the Bowery, 1825-1848.  Undertaker.  Offered horses and coaches to let.  Lived at #386, worked at #391 Bowery.
Longworth’s American Almanac, New-York Register, and City Directory, 1837, p. 206.
Documents of the Board of Aldermen of the City of New York, Volume IV, 1838, p. 478.
Memorial of St. Mark’s Church in the Bowery, Vestry, 1899. 

1839-1847 — James M. SWEENY, prominent teacher in the New York Public School system, professor of Latin and Greek languages; born 1796 in Ireland, died June 23, 1879 at his residence #264 Jay Street, Brooklyn.  At the time of his death, he was the principal of Primary School No. 24 on Elm Street.
Longworth’s American Almanac, New-York Register, and City Directory, 1839, p. 632 
Doggett’s New-York City Directory For 1846 and 1847, p. 379. 
The Evening Post, July 21, 1848, p. 2.
The Brooklyn Daily Eagle, June 26, 1879, p. 4. 

1846-1847 — George S. DREW, plumber.
Doggett’s New-York City Directory For 1846 and 1847, p. 121. 

1850-1867 — Henry MARSHALL, liquors.  “Porterhouse.”  Clerk of Tompkins’ Market.
The New York Mercantile Union Business Directory, 1850-1851, p. 327.  
Manual of the Corporation of the City of New York, 1861, p. 111. 
The New York State Business Directory and Gazetteer, 1867, p. 206. 

1877 — Charles BURGHART, beer. 
Goulding’s New York City Directory, 1877 to 1878, p. 182. 

1889 — Henry KOHLMEYER. 
Phillips’ Business Directory of New York City, Volume 19, p. 936. 

1898 — (Herman) Georg(e) SIEGEL, liquor.
New York State Department of Excise Directory of liquor tax certificate holders, p. 328. 

c. 1940-1957 J. Forest VEY (art student at Cooper Union) and wife Marguerite.  Actor Joel GREY rented from them, and Claude BROWN, author of “Manchild in the Promised Land,” lived there during that time as well.

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https://www.facebook.com/TheLostVillage2017/

I came by this information in a paper insert that was in my program for the opening reception of “Storefronts: Oral History & Photo Exhibition”:
“The Lost Village” is a stunning indictment of the corporate take-over of Greenwich Village…made possible by complicit…politicians…the bohemian, artistic world which gave the area its colorful, distinctive flavor has fled…former mom and pop shops closed. The Village is a microcosm of what is happening across the United States where the disparity of income between rich and poor is now higher than at any time in our history. This extraordinary documentary raises the alarm and…offers a way to counter such take-overs through citizen activism…A must see.” James Cass Rogers
Two upcoming Screenings-in what’s left of the Village:
SEP 7
Thu 7 PM · Jefferson Market Library · New York
SEP 10
Sun 7 PM · Judson Memorial Church – New York City · New York
Film

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Howl Happening Opening Night Sept. 10th

Sep. 10 – Oct. 06, 2017
56 Bleecker Gallery and Late 80s New York
Presented by Some Serious Business
and Howl! Happening: An Arturo Vega Project

Lust of glory pricked their hearts up, dread of shame
Struck them tame;
And that glory and that shame alike, the gold
Bought and sold.
-Robert Browning, Love Among The Ruins

Let’s also say that change is neither good or bad. It simply is. It can be greeted with terror or joy. A tantrum that says, ‘I want it the way it was’ or a dance that says, ‘Look, it’s something new.’
–Don Draper, Mad Men (AMC)

Some Serious Business and Howl! Happening are pleased to present Love Among The Ruins, co-curated by Susan Martin, founding director of Some Serious Business; Bill Stelling, 56 Bleecker gallery director and founder of the groundbreaking FUN Gallery with Patti Astor; and artist Maynard Monrow. All three curators were close friends of Dean Rolston, co-owner of 56 Bleecker who serves as inspiration for the exhibition.

Artists in this retrospective include:
Austė, Suzanne Anker, Donald Baechler, Sylvie Ball, Jean-Michel Basquiat, Julian Beck, Bill Beckley, Mike Berg, John Bowman, Jeff Carpenter, Stefano Castronovo, George Condo, Arch Connelly, Bruce Conner, Scott Covert, Ingrid Dinter, Arnold Fern, Vincent Gallo, Graham Gillmore, Allen Ginsberg, Nan Goldin, Eric Goode, Robert Hawkins, Roberto Juarez, Scott Kilgour, Ruth Kligman, Norman Korpi, Joyce Kozloff, Tseng Kwong Chi, David LaChapelle, Greer Lankton, Claire Lieberman, Daniel Mahoney, Frank Majore, Fidel Márquez, Sylvia Martins, McDermott & McGough, Taylor Mead, Nicholas Mouffarrege, David Nelson, Felix Pène du Bois, Jeff Perrone, Elizabeth Peyton, William Rand, Elaine Reicheck, Rene Ricard, Bill Rice, Alexis Rockman, Nicolas Rule, Vittorio Scarpati, Bruno Schmidt, Jo Shane, Mark Sink, Stephen Sprouse, Ken Tisa, Noel Vietor, William Wegman, Dondi White, Martin Wong, Thomas Woodruff, and Jimmy Wright.

56 Bleecker Gallery held a unique position in the late 80’s art world. Part serious gallery, part happening, the space was a scene that reflected the explosive intersection of art, performance, music, fashion and the incredible nightlife culture of that era.

Featuring many of the most cutting edge artists of the time, such as Stephen Sprouse and David LaChapelle, it also presented rigorously serious shows of artists like Bruce Conner and Elaine Reichek. The space was a forum for nightclub impresario Eric Goode to produce an installation that was a window into his future endeavors. Taylor Mead directed the gallery’s historic performance of Jackie Curtis’ Glamour, Glory and Gold featuring legendary actors Ondine, John Heys, Penny Arcade, Harry Koutoukas and Margot Howard-Howard.

56 Bleecker was a ‘scene’ as much as a venue for art. Openings featured guests as diverse as Stavros Niarchos, Richard Gere, Lauren Hutton, Fab 5 Freddy and Henry Geldzahler. Rene Ricard held court in the famous ‘Tin Room,’ anointing those in favor and banishing his enemies to NoHo Star.

While it was a time of enormous creativity, it was also one of deep sorrow. The exhibition will touch upon the impact of AIDS on our community.

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Thu 08 2017 , by

Bygone Stables

From The New York Post:

The fascinating history behind NYC’s stables-turned-real estate

Washington Mews, a little alley north of Washington Square Park, is an urban gem. Still paved with Belgian block and lined with quaint cottages, it’s a Greenwich Village street that might as well be in Europe. In fact, cities like London and Paris are filled with these tiny picturesque thoroughfares, whose cute little homes once stabled horses, carriages and sleighs.

Due to quirks in New York’s history and design, these mews are exceedingly rare in the city, making carriage-house living both scarce and coveted. Often disguised behind modest, original facades, many converted carriage homes contain architectural wonders hidden from view.

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Washington Mews: One of Manhattan’s rare alleys lined with former stables, this stretch was designed to service a row of 1830s homes along Washington Square Park.Annie Wermiel/NY Post

Take investor David Aldea’s home at 23 Cornelia St., which Taylor Swift rented in 2016. The 5,500-square-foot West Village pad was asking $40,000/month then, and is on the market with Corcoran for $24.5 million. Walking down the street, the home’s massive, arched wooden doors hint at its 1912 carriage house origins, but the unprepossessing facade might not stop passersby in their tracks.

Upon entering, however, it’s clear this is no ordinary stable: today, the garden level is graced by a 25-foot swimming pool, while an ornate Murano glass chandelier hangs from double-height ceilings. But, as Aldea notes, despite these modern touches, original details abound, particularly in the living room, where there are “24-inch square windows that would have been for the horses to stick their heads out for ventilation.”

Considering the fact that New York was a horse-and-carriage town for so many centuries, it’s surprising that there aren’t more such conversions. That’s in part because most remnants of the city’s colonial days are long gone. Also, Manhattan’s populated areas used to be far more compact; their borders barely extended north of today’s City Hall until the 1820s. The majority of New Yorkers, it seems, walked almost everywhere nearly two centuries ago.

A new street layout in the first decades of the 19th century helped the city expand, and travel by private carriage became more common — but only for the city’s elite. So few New Yorkers could afford to maintain a horse that when a commission laid out the city’s famous grid in 1811, the plan purposely excluded rear alleys for stables. Even by the Civil War, a mere 3 percent of NYC residents owned their own horses and carriages.

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Annie Wermiel/NY Post

A few early mews still exist. Take Washington Mews, which was erected behind the stately homes of “The Row,” one of New York’s first planned “terraces” of homes — a clear sign that the 1832-built Washington Square townhouses were only for the well-heeled.

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In: 19th Century , Architecture , Art and Music , Civil War , Colonial Period , Native American , Transit , Visual Documentation , World War I | Tags:  , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

From “off the Grid”, website of the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation:

The Glittering and Gritty History of 24 Bond

If you happen to look up while strolling down Bond or Lafayette Streets, you might come upon a curious sight – dozens of small, golden statues dancing along the wrought iron and brick of a traditional NoHo facade. Celebratory and airy, they’re a delightful addition to the heavy, industrial look of the rest of the area. Who do we have to thank for this artistic juxtaposition? Artist and 24 Bond resident Bruce Williams.

Williams and his wife have lived in the building for over twenty years, and he first began adorning his building’s facade in 1998. At the time, the NoHo neighborhood was much more off the beaten path than now, a small enclave for artists working in a variety of mediums. Since then, the neighborhood has gained quite a bit more distinction, glamour, and recognition. In 2008, 24 Bond Street was included in the NoHo Historic District Extension, officially recognizing the architectural significance of this 19th-century building. To celebrate, Williams added additional golden sculptures climbing up the side of his now-landmarked building. He did this, as he had always done, without asking for approval, but the new landmark status of his building required that he confer with the LPC. Despite a small ado requiring an official hearing on the outdoor art, the spritely statues were permitted to stay.

But those sculptures aren’t the only piece of artistic legacy at 24 Bond. Robert Mapplethorpe occupied a studio on the fifth floor of 24 Bond from the 1970s until his death in 1989. In this cavernous space, Mapplethorpe would invite his subjects to “do drugs, have sex, and then be photographed.” 24 Bond was infamous – Edward Mapplethorpe, Robert’s brother, said it was “so sexually charged that you needed to be pretty certain of who you were to be around it on a day-to-day basis.” Mapplethorpe photographed legions of downtown superstars in his NoHo loft, including frequent collaborator Patti Smith. It was here that they filmed 1978’s “Still Moving” which appeared at the Stephen Miller Gallery and was Smith and Mapplethorpe’s only joint exhibition.

Patti Smith, taken by Robert Mapplethorpe. It is believed that this photo is taken on Mapplethorpe’s 5th floor studio at 24 Bond.

The same year that Mapplethorpe died, the Gene Frankel Theatre moved into the ground floor of the Bond Street building. Already a well-regarded theater with serious Village bonafides, once at 24 Bond the theater nurtured the careers of burgeoning actors and exhibited bold and progressive works. Although Frankel himself died in 2005, the theater still operates out of the ground floor space, advancing its mission to nurture living playwrights and artists and to “revive NoHo as a cauldron of LGBTQI art and ideas by producing new works.”

Considering the building’s long legacy as an arts space, those gold dancers on the facade seem to fit right in.

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Monday July 24

 

6:30 PM  –  8:00 PM

Nuyorican Poets Café, 236 E 3rd St

Since it opened in 1854, McSorley’s Old Ale House has been a New York institution. This is the landmark watering hole where Abraham Lincoln campaigned and Boss Tweed kicked back with the Tammany Hall machine; where a pair of Houdini’s handcuffs found their final resting place;and where soldiers left behind wishbones before departing for the First World War, never to return and collect them. Many of the bar’s traditions remain intact, from the newspaper-covered walls to the plates of cheese and raw onions, the sawdust-covered floors to the tall-tales told by its bartenders.

McSorley’s is also home to deep, personal stories – including that of Geoffrey “Bart” Bartholomew, a career bartender of 45 years, and his son Rafe who grew up helping his dad at the landmark bar. Join Rafe to talk about his new book on the topic, where he explores McSorley’s bizarre rituals, bawdy humor, and eccentric tasks, including protecting decades-old dust on treasured artifacts and defending a 150-year-old space against the worst of Hurricane Sandy.

Free. Reservations required.
[This event is not accessible.]

Free
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From Veranda Magazine:

Aaron Burr’s West Village Home Is for Sale

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Secret Speakeasy
One of My Favorite Things…and Yours!
Party in Soho
Sun Jan 22nd 2016
6pm – 10pm

A perfect date night or come meet someone new!
There will be refreshments

The Museum of Interesting Things
takes over a Soho loft for a special
Pick your piece themed party for the Museum.
16mm short movie fest & party!
Drinks, music & beautiful visuals!

Go on our website, see an item
email me dennydanielx@gmail.com
And I Will try to Bring It For You!
It is my B-day week so come enjoy!

SPECIAL BOWIE, Prince TRIBUTE
and other artists who left us 2016:
Hear Bowie and more on vintage vinyl,

In the spirit of a true Speakeasy
Anything can change so…
Please check this website before leaving.

All eras of history some over 100 years old!
See Old 16mm circus, Jazz, animations, vaudeville
and more

The Museum has a show featuring
Original Rare short 16mm films from the
1940’s, 1950’s and 1960’s
and you get to pick the films allll night!

and many more 16mm as well as a few 8mm films too!
Early 1900’s and some 1800’s
Stereoviews and Mutoscope cards!

See 16mm short films
Hear original vinyl records
Enjoy actual antiques you can handle and get demonstrated!

The Loft at Prince Street
177 Prince str NYC NY 10012
6th floor penthouse with rooftop garden
$10 to help the museum :
Between Thompson & Sullivan street
in Soho NYC 212 274 8757

Advance tickets

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/museum-of-interesting-things-secret-speakeasy-sun-jan-22nd-tickets-30803200201

This is a loungie place….so please let us know
I f you have special needs and require seating

You are part of a select few receiving this website.
Please only spread to people you know and love!
Yes, the rumors are true, we are shooting part of
a pilot for a possible show at the gig. smile 😉…

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