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Jefferson Market Library

19th Century Parlorcraft Circle: Paper Flowers, Cookie Swap,
and Yuletide Social

Saturday, December 23, 2017
2:30 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.
Jefferson Market Library
Third Floor
425 Avenue of the Americas
New York, NY 10011

Join the New York Nineteenth Century Society Parlorcraft Circle as we explore the art and craft of paper flowers. The history of artificial flowers dates back many thousands of years; they are mentioned in the Old Testament. Among the poor of the 19th century, constructing paper flowers was a common means of earning money. Entire families would make paper flowers to sell on the street. The 1891 census reported 4,011 flower-makers in London. It was also a genteel activity for more affluent ladies. Many period magazines and journals include instruction and templates for flower-making. Artificial flowers were used to trim ladies’ hats, gowns, corsages, and accessories, and paper flowers were used for festive decorations and commemorations such as Remembrance Day.

We’ll provide materials and instruction to make seasonal paper poinsettias, holly, Christmas roses, and other blooms. If time permits, we’ll even show you how to assemble them into garlands and wreaths.

In addition to our amazing paper flower tutorials, it’s also time for our annual NYNCS Cookie Swap and Yuletide Social! Non-crafters are welcome to attend this event. Please bring one dozen homemade cookies if you would like to participate in the swap. No cookies, no problem! We always have extra. Stop by to say hello and enjoy seasonal treats, hot chocolate, spiced cider, and/or other surprise comestibles!

No need to RSVP; just bring yourselves and if you wish, one dozen cookies to swap! All who bring cookies will go home with an assortment of leftovers.

If you have a special craft or skill from history that you would like to share, please let us know: letters@nyncs.org

Please leave your laptops and modern sewing/craft projects at home for this event – we’re all about the historic hand work!

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https://www.facebook.com/TheLostVillage2017/

I came by this information in a paper insert that was in my program for the opening reception of “Storefronts: Oral History & Photo Exhibition”:
“The Lost Village” is a stunning indictment of the corporate take-over of Greenwich Village…made possible by complicit…politicians…the bohemian, artistic world which gave the area its colorful, distinctive flavor has fled…former mom and pop shops closed. The Village is a microcosm of what is happening across the United States where the disparity of income between rich and poor is now higher than at any time in our history. This extraordinary documentary raises the alarm and…offers a way to counter such take-overs through citizen activism…A must see.” James Cass Rogers
Two upcoming Screenings-in what’s left of the Village:
SEP 7
Thu 7 PM · Jefferson Market Library · New York
SEP 10
Sun 7 PM · Judson Memorial Church – New York City · New York
Film

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Details

Join the New York Nineteenth Century Society Parlorcraft Circle as we explore cravats, jabots, and ties! From sailors to schoolgirls, gentlemen of leisure to “New Women,” neckties were an essential part of the 19th-century wardrobe. Since the 17th-century French king Louis XIII made them fashionable, neckties have been de rigeur in Western society. From the voluminous white Regency stock to Navy officer’s black neck-cloth, the loose working-man’s kerchief to the thin four-tingered ties worn in the American West, no 19th-century man’s wardrobe was complete without one. Neckwear was also part of women’s attire. Lacy jabots and collars allowed them to change the look of a limited wardrobe. Sailor collars and narrow ties were often part of school uniforms for girls, and the “New Woman” made famous by Charles Dana Gibson frequently sported a tie along with her shirtwaist and walking skirt.Materials, supplies, and instruction will be provided to make a 1907 jabot, a bow tie, and an ascot or cravat. You are welcome to bring your own fabrics. Cotton works well for bow ties – heavier for bow ties, light cotton batiste or lawn for the jabot. Ascots and cravats can be of any material but we find cotton to be most comfortable around the neck. Old sheets and pillowcases are ideal for these projects.Tea and light refreshments will be served but you may bring your own treats to share if you wish. Please leave your laptops and modern sewing/craft projects
at home for this event – we’re all about the historic hand work!Moderated by Rachel Klingberg and Morgana Toglia, we heartily invite you to craft and design to your hearts content!

If you have a special craft or skill from history that you would like to share, please let us know: letters@nyncs

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  • Join the New York Nineteenth Century Society Parlorcraft Circle as we explore wallets and reticules! Small carrying cases for personal items date back to the earliest civilizations, but social changes in the 18th and 19th centuries led to their evolution into the types of bags we still carry today. Pouches for coins, commonly worn at the belt to prevent theft, were replaced by wallets, pocket-books, envelope purses, and reticules. Though men relied upon their jacket and trouser pockets, and the working classes would have not carried more than a few coins, gentlemen of the upper classes carried letters, tobacco, paper money, and other sundries in wallets and small cases. Hunters, fishermen, and outdoorsmen carried small pouches for ammunition or fishing flies. Soldiers carried sewing tools and toiletries in rolled-up bags called “housewifes.” Sailors carried their possessions in sea-bags, often highly decorated, and carpet bags were popular for travellers. Women carried market-bags for shopping and knitted “misers’s purses” for money. The narrow, high-waisted silhoutte of Regency fashions made belt purses and removable pockets of earlier eras impractical. Small, dainty evening bags called reticules were worn by fashionable ladies to carry handkerchiefs, fans, dance cards, scent, smelling salts, and other necessities.LOCATION:Jefferson Market Library, Third Floor
    425 Avenue of the Americas
    New York, NY 10011

    Materials, supplies, and instruction will be provided to make an an 1862 wallet, an 1864 “housewife,” or an 1831 reticule. Equivalent modern patterns will also be available for simplified projects. You are welcome to bring your own fabrics (sturdier fabrics work best for the wallet, lighter fabrics for the reticule, and cotton is suitable for the “housewife.”)

    Tea and light refreshments will be served but you may bring your own treats to share if you wish. Please leave your laptops and modern sewing/craft projects at home for this event – we’re all about the historic hand work!

    Materials for this event also supplied by the generosity of Materials for the Arts.

    Moderated by Rachel Klingberg and Morgana Toglia, we heartily invite you to craft and design to your hearts content!

    If you have a special craft or skill from history that you would like to share, please let us know: letters@nyncs.org.

 …

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Onstage Outlaws: Mae West & Texas Guinan Jefferson Market Library; 6:30pm
Visit the courtroom where infamous writer/starlet Mae West was tried for indecency in 1927; see rare photos of the speakeasies and night spots frequented by West and writer/producer Texas Guinan; and hear West’s jailhouse poetry in this immersive look at the lives of the Prohibition era’s most fabulous broads.…

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