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From Bowery Boogie:

Breaking: ‘Cup & Saucer’ Ending Service on Monday After Decades on Canal Street

Posted on: July 12th, 2017 at 12:39 pm by

Say goodbye to that classic 1940s Coca-Cola sign at the corner of Eldridge and Canal Streets. Word on the block is that the fabled luncheonette, Cup & Saucer, is hanging it up. It’s closing shop after decades serving the neighborhood, thanks to a steep rent hike.

And there’s no time for you to process this information, either, as the last day of business is Monday.

Every few years, rumors surface detailing a demise that was continuously eluded. Especially after the building reportedly sold several years ago, creating much uncertainty whether the business would actually survive. Co-owner John Vasilopoulos told Metro in 2015 that he hoped the new owner would maintain the 5-year lease arrangement of the predecessor to keep afloat. Then there was the recent upstairs fire back in January, which no doubt threatened the operation. This time, however, it appears the talk is true. A tipster who frequents the establishment daily was informed by staff of the closure. Apparently, they started telling all the regular customers today.

We don’t really know what to say. The Cup & Saucer is a no-frills Lower East Side treasure that serves all strata of the community. “Giving the people of New York quality food, fast delivery, and great customer service,” as its website prominently touts. On any given morning, you find construction workers, commuters, travelers, and locals mingling at the countertop.

It’s been under the same ownership for nearly thirty years. Partners Nick Castanos (also a cook) and John Vasilopoulos took over the business in 1988, yet local lore suggests the corner kitchen dates back some 77 years. The duo also owns a diner in Ridgewood, Queens.

Our tipster surmises that the luncheonette also fell victim to the effects of failed development (i.e. the Canal Tower) and the encroaching Chinatown Bus situation that’s multiplying along Canal Street between Forsyth and Allen.


Visual Documentation of the distinguishing interior features of the now-bygone The Cup & Saucer Luncheonette (from Untapped Cities.com)

Iconic NYC Diner “The Cup & Saucer” Closing Down After Nearly 70 Years

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Movie Series Dealing With Life in Brooklyn at the Metrograph

Making Rent in Bed-Stuy

June 9 to June 12

On the occasion of the release of Brandon Harris’s first book, Making Rent in Bed-Stuy: A Memoir of Trying to Make it in New York City, called “a rebuke, in a form newly discovered, to the people James Baldwin once called ‘our morally dishonest and desperately dishonest countrymen,” by N+1 founder Keith Gessen, Metrograph is pleased to present six films that speak to the neighborhood and surrounding area’s rich cultural and political legacy as a black space, the lives of some of its most famous scions and as a bulwark, increasingly imperiled, for Brooklyn’s black population.

Brandon Harris to introduce Crooklyn on June 9. Following the screening, Harris will be signing copies of his book, Making Rent in Bed-Stuy.

A Q&A with Sebastián Silva and Brandon Harris to follow the screening of Nasty Baby.

Program notes by Brandon Harris

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I saw this story posted on facebook, with a number of cynical comments gathering underneath about how it wouldn’t be long before the fire would be used as a rationale to demolish the building, and put an unaffordable condo complex in its place.

Bowery Boogie reports the following concerning the situation:

“The Lower East Side is covered in smoke right now. Several readers are telling us that the historic synagogue on Norfolk Street – Beth Hamedrash Hagadol – is currently up in flames. The FDNY labeled it a 3-alarm fire. One eyewitness riding his bike along Delancey told us that he heard a “big explosion” followed quickly by the plume. We have yet to confirm this detail.

A smaller fire reportedly broke out in the building on May 7, but was extinguished.

UPDATE: the 3-alarm fire is under control as of 7:50pm. Thankfully, there were no injuries reported in the incident.

More as it develops. Drop us a line if you know what’s happening.”

The fears of it being destroyed are not groundless: Bowery Boogie had previously reported:

“Beth Hamedrash Hagadol congregation in 1885 for $45,000 (about $1.2 million today). The New York City Landmarks Commission found that “Beth Hamedrash Hagadol Synagogue has a special character, special historical and aesthetic interest, and value as part of the development, heritage and cultural characteristics of New York City.”

This historic, religious edifice has been making headlines for some time now, mostly with regard to its preservation. The upkeep became too expensive for congregants. Moreover, even though it’s been protected since 1967, Rabbi Mendel Greenbaum had, at one point, petitioned the LPC to de-landmark the structure so that condominiums could be built instead. As a trade, a small synagogue would be built on the ground floor for the floundering congregation.”

If the worst happens, these photos below might be the only way people have to see this beautiful house of worship.

From Bowery Boogie:

Inside the Decaying Beth Hamedrash Hagadol Synagogue on Norfolk Street [PHOTOS]

Posted on: February 20th, 2014 at 11:06 am by

Sanctuary of Beth Hamedrash Hagadol in ruins, Photo: Landmarks Conservancy

Sanctuary of Beth Hamedrash Hagadol in ruins, Photo: Landmarks Conservancy

“SAVE the FIRST Eastern European [Russian] Synagogue in the Americas,” reads the inactive Facebook page dedicated to Beth Hamedrash Hagadol.

The historic Gothic Revival synagogue was built in 1850 as a Baptist church and purchased by the Beth Hamedrash Hagadol congregation in 1885 for $45,000 (about $1.2 million today). The New York City Landmarks Commission found that “Beth Hamedrash Hagadol Synagogue has a special character, special historical and aesthetic interest, and value as part of the development, heritage and cultural characteristics of New York City.”

This historic, religious edifice has been making headlines for some time now, mostly with regard to its preservation. The upkeep became too expensive for congregants. Moreover, even though it’s been protected since 1967, Rabbi Mendel Greenbaum had, at one point, petitioned the LPC to de-landmark the structure so that condominiums could be built instead. As a trade, a small synagogue would be built on the ground floor for the floundering congregation.

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from the Lo-Down:

Masaryk Towers Closes Rivington Street Gates

masaryk gate closed

There have been some tense moments outside the Masaryk Towers apartment complex this afternoon. The cooperative today carried out a long-expected and controversial plan — closing gates on a de-mapped section of Rivington Street, between Columbia and Pitt streets. The closure cuts off a main passageway used by the neighborhood-at-large to travel throughout the community.

We’re told by people in the area, including District Leader Paul Newell, that the decision is already prompting a big reaction. Newell says the feedback from Masaryk residents is mixed, while sentiment from the larger community is resoundingly negative.

Months ago, Grand Street Settlement expressed serious concerns about the closure. The entrance of the non-profit organization’s senior center is located just beyond the gates, near Pitt Street. Executive Director Robert Cordero was promised by the co-op’s leadership that the community would be advised of the changes well in advance of the closure. There was almost no warning before the gates were shut today. Here’s part of a petition Grand Street Settlement is circulating:

This closure places undo burden on the 4,000+ children, youth, families, and seniors who visit our center (including those who reside in Masaryk Towers). We are especially worried about our seniors who live in Baruch Houses on the East River and have limited mobility. On May 4th, Grand St. Settlement received the following notice that the gates will be closed from Bernice McCallum, Chair of Masaryk Board of Directors: “This is an update regarding the closing of the gates.  The Board of Masaryk Towers decided to close the gates.  The gate closure is one of the many measures Masaryk has taken to ensure the safety and security of its residents; and while it will take some time getting used to, we trust that our neighbors will understand Masaryk’s decision.  Thanks. “  Unfortunately, this is all of the information we have. We do not know when the gates will close. Grand St. Settlement’s Executive Director has been promised multiple times that Masaryk leadership will provide clear communication and coordination regarding the gates, and we are very disappointed that this was not the case.

The petition asks Masaryk Towers to provide access to seniors and children and to fully communicate with the community about its plans.

We have a call into Masaryk Towers’ management office. We’ll let you know when the co-op responds. In late 2015, Masaryk Board President Bernice McCallum told us that, when the gates close, “the walkway will be available to the surrounding residents at designed times.” The board, she said, decided to close the gates because there have been, “a considerable amount of trips and falls.” This, she indicated, put the cooperative “at risk for not getting insurance or paying at a higher rate.” McCallum added, “we would like to continue to be good neighbors and assist wherever possible.”

 …

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From the e-mail newsletter of Live-In Theater Interactive Experiences New York:

April is here, and we have a gift for you. Not only will you get three different murder mystery adventures, each with an open bar, but you’ll get a 20% discount. At checkout, just enter the promo code 20SPRING after you enter your name and email address.
Go get ’em, detective.
Some of their productions:
Two siblings dead, and the air rife with foul play. Travel back to the seedy underbelly of Five Points and seek out justice in this Live In Theater classic.

The Lombardi Case: 1975

A high profile murder in a drug riddled squat in the Lower East Side. Watch out for your friends as you navigate a world of sex, drugs, and violence.

Fierce & Deadly: 1988

Inspired by actual events. A party, a memorial, and a mystery. Guests will join a marginalized community as they celebrate the life of one of their fallen sisters.

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from Pulsd.com:

Flappers and sporting gents alike take a trip back to pre-prohibition New York City at The Fourth Annual NYC Craft Distillers Festival, a speakeasy-style extravaganza taking place at The Bowery Hotel’s spectacular, private, indoor/outdoor events space on Saturday March 25, 2017.

Sample over 60 artisanal spirits from more than 20 of the industry’s premiere craft distilleries with your $59 GA Ticket to Session 1 from 1:00pm until 4:00pm (a $102 value), or $69 GA Ticket to Session 2 from 7:00pm until 10:00pm (a $107 value).

Participating distilleries serving up signature cocktails or neat tastings include Blue Nectar Spirits (Tequila Silver, Tequila Añejo), Springbrook Hollow Farm Distillery (Two Sisters Vodka, Sly Fox Gin, Howl at the Moonshine Apple Pie),Harvest Spirits (Core Vodka, Rare Pear Brandy), Riviera Imports (Kind of Blue Scotch Whisky) and many others!

Joining the inventive spirits brands will be ariel swing dancers, burlesque performers and a 1920’s jazz band!

Given how incredible both the event and venue are, you may wish to consider going VIP. Your $89 Session 1 VIP Ticket gets you in at 12:00pm for Session 1 and your $99 Session 2 VIP Ticket gets you in at 6:00pm for Session 2.

During this extra VIP only hour, you’ll have more time to chat with your favorite distillers and they’ll have more time to make you the perfect drink…

LOCATION
Bowery Hotel
335 Bowery
(212) 505-9100

Use two fingers to move the map

MERCHANT

On Saturday March 25, 2017 the Roaring Twenties come to life once again at The Fourth Annual NYC Craft Distillers Festival, taking place on the second floor ballroom of the stylish Bowery Hotel.

Inspired by the decade of speakeasies, bathtub gin and jazz, the event will showcase artisanal, small-batch spirits from top distilleries like Industry The Manhattan Moonshine Company (Manhattan Moonshine), Philadelphia Distilling (Bluecoat American Dry Gin, Vieux Carre Absinthe), Widow Jane (Widow Jane Bourbon, Applewood Rye Mash) and more.

Chat with the distillers themselves as you sample more than 60 premium spirits, from pear brandy to white blossom vodka to citrus gin.

Two 1920s-style jazz bands will be on hand to provide live music, making for a truly spirited evening.

A list of presenting distillers, and the spirits they will be serving, may be found here.

Your GA Ticket Includes:

  • General Admission to The Fourth Annual NYC Craft Distillers Festival.
  • Take your pick from Session 1 GA (1:00pm until 4:00pm) or Session 2 GA (7:00pm until 10:00pm).
  • Experience over 20 of the industry’s premiere craft distilleries, serving more than 60 premium spirits.

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from Bowery Boogie:

In Historic Move, Bari Restaurant Equipment is Relocating its Manufacturing off the Bowery

Posted on: February 7th, 2017 at 5:00 am by

bari-bowery-lease

Another big change is happening on the Bowery. And it’s indicative of the overall trend taking hold.

Bari Restaurant Equipment, the eight-decade-old restaurant supplier on the Bowery, is shifting some of its resources away from the thoroughfare. The Bari family is reportedly moving the manufacturing arm of its business from the headquarters building, instead relocating across the Hudson to New Jersey. As it stands, this function encompasses both 234 Bowery and 5 Prince Street, the two buildings it purchased last summer for a combined $12.3 million. Its famed pizza equipment is assembled and maintained in these connected storefronts.

Evidence of this shift appeared late last week in the form of a subtle leasing sign.

“The real estate market does not warrant manufacturing in NYC,” owner Frank Bari told us in an email. “We were/are probably one of the last [commercial manufacturers] to do so. But Bari will be around [the Lower East Side] for a while.”

The goal is to get pretty much any kind of tenant except food. Retail or gallery is the likely choice. No restaurants.

Bari’s supply business was established in the 1940s by Nicola Bari, a radio repairman and purveyor of cheese graters. In the ensuing years, the focus became restaurant supplies of all sorts, albeit with a focus on pizza ovens and refrigeration units. Their block-spanning flagship is a veritable gold mine, and gave the community a scare some eight years ago when the building – about 67,000 square-feet of buildable real estate – was placed on the open market.

 

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After 180 Years on the Block, 201 East Broadway is Eradicated for Modular Housing

Posted on: February 1st, 2017 at 5:18 am by

201eastbroadway-gone

Bye Bye, 201 East Broadway.

There it sat, for nearly two centuries (b. 1837), eventually acting as headquarters for the United Hebrew Community. Now, the recent property sale has prompted demolition of the Greek Revival buildings, and subsequent plans for modular housing, the first of its kind on the Lower East Side.

Just like that, 180 years dismantled and tossed into the back of a truck. This is a sentiment often repeated across the Lower East Side, yet seemingly with more frequency these days. Indeed, just up the block, a two-century-old Federal row house was equally pulverized.

In the meantime, Boogie reader Mitch Weinstein sends along this photo showing an aerial view of the carnage. He notes, “ghosts being demolished at 201-203 East Broadway.”

201eastbroadway-gone-2

As previously reported, owner-developer Daniel Wise (aka 201 EB Development III, LLC) purchased the side-by-side properties in 2015 for $8.5 million, and intends to combine the tax lots for the new mixed-use development. Plans were first submited to the Department of Buildings in September 2015, which call for seven stories stacked with ten modular apartments. Each pre-fab condo unit will carry approximately 1,487 square-feet, some with private terraces. The ground floor and basement spaces will offer 3,617 square-feet of commercial and 1,968 square-feet of medical office space respectively.

Think Architecture and Design is the architect of record on the new project.

201-203 East Broadway, September 2015

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from The New York Times:
Sy Kattelson’s View of Postwar Street Life in New York
By JOHN LELAND JAN. 27, 2017
Sy Kattelson started taking photographs before World War II, using a camera so big and unwieldy it took two people to operate. His subjects were models for catalogs or magazines, and his images were often used as source material for illustrations. When Mr. Kattelson, who will turn 94 next month, returned from the war, it was with a more portable camera and a sharper eye. He joined the left-leaning Photo League and began documenting the street life of lower-middle-class New Yorkers.
“Most people doing that type of work were doing poverty-stricken people, like on the Lower East Side,” said Mr. Kattelson, who grew up in the Bronx and Queens, the son of an electrician and a shop owner. “I started to think, ‘What about people like me, who were not in poverty?’ So I tried to show people what they were living like.” Often overshadowed by better-known members of the Photo League, such as Sid Grossman or Lisette Model, Mr. Kattelson continued to evolve after the League dissolved in 1951, under suspicion of being a Communist organization. “I didn’t want to keep making the same pictures all over again,” he said from his home in Saugerties in the Hudson Valley. By the 1980s, he said, “I got interested in double exposures and putting pictures together” in collages. He added, “I wanted to get more information in pictures.”
Those later works are on exhibit for the first time at the Howard Greenberg Gallery in Manhattan, along with older images, in his first solo exhibition in nearly 20 years. “I remember people arguing about whether photography was a serious art form,” he said. “The Photo League talked about it the way I thought about it, as a serious art form showing ordinary people’s lives.” The group’s political leanings, he said, were never his concern. “I was just trying to show the world what it was.”

A version of this article appears in print on January 29, 2017, on Page MB8 of the New York edition with the headline: Ordinary People.…

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from pulsd:
Join LES’s Most Famous Bars & Essex Street Market For A Discussion, Along With Tastings
13 followers
120 Essex Street |
Today
6:30PM – 8:00PM
DETAILS

The Lower East Side has undergone so much change in the last decade, and is arguably the only neighborhood in Manhattan where Jewish fabric stores and mom-and-pop shops stand next to trendy boutiques, hair salons, and hotel bars. Join Essex Street Market and proprietors of the neighborhood’s most famous bars and clubs, such as Max Fish, Lucky Jack’s and Hair of the Dog, for a discussion of the changing retail landscape. The discussion starts at 7pm, but come early for the reception at 6:30pm with complimentary tastings and drinks.

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