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Manhattan

From The Museum of The City of New York: Gilded New York exhibit info

Explore the visual culture of elite New York in the late-19th and early- 20th centuries.

Inaugurating the Museum’s Tiffany & Co. Foundation Gallery, Gilded New York explores the city’s visual culture at the end of the 19th century, when its elite class flaunted their money as never before. In New York, this era was marked by the sudden rise of industrial and corporate wealth, amassed by such titans as Cornelius Vanderbilt and Jay Gould, who expressed their high status through extravagant fashions, architecture, and interior design. The exhibition presents a lavish display of some 100 works, including costumes, jewelry, portraits, and decorative objects, all created between the mid-1870s and the early 20th century. The dazzling works in the exhibition will illuminate an era when members of the new American aristocracy often displayed their wealth in storied balls in Fifth Avenue mansions and hotels. It was a time when New York became the nation’s corporate headquarters and a popular Ladies’ Mile of luxury retail establishments and cultural institutions helped launch the city to global prominence.


Continue the Gilded New York experience outside the Museum by taking a walk through Gilded-Era New York with actress Grace Gummer as your guide. Download the Gilded NY App on your iPhone or Android device today!

1220 Fifth Ave at 103rd St.
Open Daily 10am–6pm

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A discussion about Photography In New York In the 1970s with Philip Trager and Ken Scheles:

Authors of NEW YORK IN THE 1970’S AND INVISIBLE CITY

At: Rizzoli Bookstore 1133 Broadway, at 26th Street.

Event held on 3/28/2017 from 6-8pm…

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from Pulsd.com:

Flappers and sporting gents alike take a trip back to pre-prohibition New York City at The Fourth Annual NYC Craft Distillers Festival, a speakeasy-style extravaganza taking place at The Bowery Hotel’s spectacular, private, indoor/outdoor events space on Saturday March 25, 2017.

Sample over 60 artisanal spirits from more than 20 of the industry’s premiere craft distilleries with your $59 GA Ticket to Session 1 from 1:00pm until 4:00pm (a $102 value), or $69 GA Ticket to Session 2 from 7:00pm until 10:00pm (a $107 value).

Participating distilleries serving up signature cocktails or neat tastings include Blue Nectar Spirits (Tequila Silver, Tequila Añejo), Springbrook Hollow Farm Distillery (Two Sisters Vodka, Sly Fox Gin, Howl at the Moonshine Apple Pie),Harvest Spirits (Core Vodka, Rare Pear Brandy), Riviera Imports (Kind of Blue Scotch Whisky) and many others!

Joining the inventive spirits brands will be ariel swing dancers, burlesque performers and a 1920’s jazz band!

Given how incredible both the event and venue are, you may wish to consider going VIP. Your $89 Session 1 VIP Ticket gets you in at 12:00pm for Session 1 and your $99 Session 2 VIP Ticket gets you in at 6:00pm for Session 2.

During this extra VIP only hour, you’ll have more time to chat with your favorite distillers and they’ll have more time to make you the perfect drink…

LOCATION
Bowery Hotel
335 Bowery
(212) 505-9100

Use two fingers to move the map

MERCHANT

On Saturday March 25, 2017 the Roaring Twenties come to life once again at The Fourth Annual NYC Craft Distillers Festival, taking place on the second floor ballroom of the stylish Bowery Hotel.

Inspired by the decade of speakeasies, bathtub gin and jazz, the event will showcase artisanal, small-batch spirits from top distilleries like Industry The Manhattan Moonshine Company (Manhattan Moonshine), Philadelphia Distilling (Bluecoat American Dry Gin, Vieux Carre Absinthe), Widow Jane (Widow Jane Bourbon, Applewood Rye Mash) and more.

Chat with the distillers themselves as you sample more than 60 premium spirits, from pear brandy to white blossom vodka to citrus gin.

Two 1920s-style jazz bands will be on hand to provide live music, making for a truly spirited evening.

A list of presenting distillers, and the spirits they will be serving, may be found here.

Your GA Ticket Includes:

  • General Admission to The Fourth Annual NYC Craft Distillers Festival.
  • Take your pick from Session 1 GA (1:00pm until 4:00pm) or Session 2 GA (7:00pm until 10:00pm).
  • Experience over 20 of the industry’s premiere craft distilleries, serving more than 60 premium spirits.

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from Eater New York:

Le Perigord Shutters After 53 Years to De-Unionize

Owner Georges Briguet plans to reopen it as a new restaurant later this year

Update: Local 100 organizer Mike Feld tells Eater that he’s been negotiating with Briguet since last year, and the owner’s been clear that he’s not happy with the increases.…

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Annual New York Antiquarian Book Fair

Friday Through Sunday, March 9th-March 12th.

Over 200 American and International Exhibitors.

Preview

Thur March 9  5-9pm

Open Hours

Fri March 10    noon-8pm

Sat March 11    noon-7pm

Sun March 12  noon-5pm

Discovery Day, Sunday, 1pm-3pm

Bring a treasure to be evaluated by our experts! Free with paid admission to the Fair.

Ticket Prices

Preview Pass

$50 (includes one daily re-admission)

Daily Admission $25

Students $10 (with valid ID)

Student tickets only available at the door

Run of Show: $40

Park Avenue Armory
643 Park Avenue, New York
Between 66/67 Streets

 The Armory’s 55,000 square foot drill hall, reminiscent of the original Grand Central Depot and the great train sheds of Europe, remains one of the largest unobstructed spaces of its kind in New York. A marvel of engineering in its time, it was designed by Regiment veteran and architect Charles W. Clinton, later a partner of Clinton & Russell, architects of the Apthorp Apartments and the famed, now demolished, Astor Hotel.

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From Knickerbocker Village Blog: “A House Of Refuge With Stories To Tell

An excerpt from a June 6, 2008 Streetscapes’ column by Christopher Gray

ON a street of intensely varied architecture, the busy red brick structure at 307 East 12th Street still attracts confused curiosity. Tenement? Club? Institution? It is hard to tell. The building, one of Manhattan’s newest landmarks, has elements of all three. Built in 1892 as the Elizabeth Home for Girls, it housed several dozen young women rescued from abusive homes, offering them safe lodging, job training and healthy communal activities. The Elizabeth Home was built by the Children’s Aid Society, founded in 1853 by the Rev. Charles Loring Brace, part of a great wave of reform that swept over New York in the mid-19th century. Mr. Brace was concerned about the thousands of children, some orphans, some simply on their own, who made their way as best they could selling newspapers or matches, or surviving in gangs or through other activities. In 1863, he established a refuge for girls in an older building on St. Marks Place, and beginning in 1879 built a variety of entirely new structures for boys. The girls did not get their new building until 13 years later, when the Elizabeth Home opened as the last of 11 projects in Manhattan for the society. All were designed by Calvert Vaux of Vaux & Radford. .. Mr. Vaux’s building design in such cases usually conformed to a type: four stories high, fiery red brick, bearing a picturesque roof line and sited at midblock. (Another notable example, the Mott Street Industrial School, survives on Mott south of Houston Street.) The girls’ home, named after Elizabeth Davenport Wheeler and paid for by her children, had dormitories, classrooms, a lounge and six private rooms with names like Daisy, Pansy and Forget-Me-Not; there were 58 beds in all. It also had a washing and drying room: laundry was an important trade taught to the girls, along with typing and dressmaking. ……Some idea of the home’s residents can be gleaned from an article in The New York Times in 1887 — while they were still installed in their St. Marks Place building. Annie Brown, 28, was described as having been left on the streets by her parents as an infant. Although adopted, she was said to have run away three times and become obsessed with discovering her biological parents, constantly searching through municipal records. Finally, according to the article, she had a breakdown, shrieking in the dormitory on St. Marks until she could be restrained. The society’s annual report of 1893 mentioned one girl in particular, Bertie, who “sings softly about the house, and has a mania for cleaning up closets and corners.” In that year, the home took in 401 girls, who laundered 77,721 pieces of clothing.

The girls listed in the 1900 census were mostly 14 to 21 years old and native to New York. These included Lillian Hadden, 16; Christiana Christian, 18; and Barbara Huff, 20.

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After 180 Years on the Block, 201 East Broadway is Eradicated for Modular Housing

Posted on: February 1st, 2017 at 5:18 am by

201eastbroadway-gone

Bye Bye, 201 East Broadway.

There it sat, for nearly two centuries (b. 1837), eventually acting as headquarters for the United Hebrew Community. Now, the recent property sale has prompted demolition of the Greek Revival buildings, and subsequent plans for modular housing, the first of its kind on the Lower East Side.

Just like that, 180 years dismantled and tossed into the back of a truck. This is a sentiment often repeated across the Lower East Side, yet seemingly with more frequency these days. Indeed, just up the block, a two-century-old Federal row house was equally pulverized.

In the meantime, Boogie reader Mitch Weinstein sends along this photo showing an aerial view of the carnage. He notes, “ghosts being demolished at 201-203 East Broadway.”

201eastbroadway-gone-2

As previously reported, owner-developer Daniel Wise (aka 201 EB Development III, LLC) purchased the side-by-side properties in 2015 for $8.5 million, and intends to combine the tax lots for the new mixed-use development. Plans were first submited to the Department of Buildings in September 2015, which call for seven stories stacked with ten modular apartments. Each pre-fab condo unit will carry approximately 1,487 square-feet, some with private terraces. The ground floor and basement spaces will offer 3,617 square-feet of commercial and 1,968 square-feet of medical office space respectively.

Think Architecture and Design is the architect of record on the new project.

201-203 East Broadway, September 2015

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from The New York Times:
Sy Kattelson’s View of Postwar Street Life in New York
By JOHN LELAND JAN. 27, 2017
Sy Kattelson started taking photographs before World War II, using a camera so big and unwieldy it took two people to operate. His subjects were models for catalogs or magazines, and his images were often used as source material for illustrations. When Mr. Kattelson, who will turn 94 next month, returned from the war, it was with a more portable camera and a sharper eye. He joined the left-leaning Photo League and began documenting the street life of lower-middle-class New Yorkers.
“Most people doing that type of work were doing poverty-stricken people, like on the Lower East Side,” said Mr. Kattelson, who grew up in the Bronx and Queens, the son of an electrician and a shop owner. “I started to think, ‘What about people like me, who were not in poverty?’ So I tried to show people what they were living like.” Often overshadowed by better-known members of the Photo League, such as Sid Grossman or Lisette Model, Mr. Kattelson continued to evolve after the League dissolved in 1951, under suspicion of being a Communist organization. “I didn’t want to keep making the same pictures all over again,” he said from his home in Saugerties in the Hudson Valley. By the 1980s, he said, “I got interested in double exposures and putting pictures together” in collages. He added, “I wanted to get more information in pictures.”
Those later works are on exhibit for the first time at the Howard Greenberg Gallery in Manhattan, along with older images, in his first solo exhibition in nearly 20 years. “I remember people arguing about whether photography was a serious art form,” he said. “The Photo League talked about it the way I thought about it, as a serious art form showing ordinary people’s lives.” The group’s political leanings, he said, were never his concern. “I was just trying to show the world what it was.”

A version of this article appears in print on January 29, 2017, on Page MB8 of the New York edition with the headline: Ordinary People.…

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Friday, February 3rd, 1pm – 8pm
Saturday, February 4th, 11am – 6pm

Manhattan Vintage Clothing Show is New York City’s premier vintage clothing shopping event. An extraordinary vintage selection, from 70 top vintage clothing dealers, highlight this two day shopping extravaganza that draws designers, stylists, celebrities and the fashion-smart world wide!

Come shop the collection that 100 years of fashion design built.

#findyourownstyle @thevintageshow

located at
125 West 18th Street (Between 6th & 7th) New York, NY 10011

Subway at 18th Street & 7th Ave – 1 Train

Buy tickets now & save $5 off admission!

Or print out this VIP invitation and bring with you to save $5 off the regular admission price of $15 at the door.

Buy Discount Tickets Here!
—…

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