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If time travel were possible, someone visiting New York City during late November through December 100 years ago would find familiar scenes: these 17 photos show how those living in New York City between 1900 and 1915 shopped and stocked up for the holiday season. Despite the pervasiveness of online shopping in modern times, New Yorkers still crowd sidewalks and public places, and do their share of in-person shopping before the holidays. Special, temporary “holiday markets” have become increasingly popular, despite the great improvements made to online shopping in recent years. While those photos from the previous century seem to show that commercialism wasn’t as rampant as it is today, the late 19th century saw the trappings we now associate with Christmas start to spread to all levels of society, although with less thoroughness than in our times. There were some cultural differences, though. Apparently, Christmas postcards were big.

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A Description of the New York Central Park, with Maureen Meister, art historian, professor, and author.

Thursday, June 15, 2017, 6:30 p.m.

Program Locations:

Fully accessible to wheelchairs
First come, first served

This illustrated lecture reintroduces readers to A Description of the New York Central Park, published in 1869 and widely considered the most important book about the park to appear during its early years.

Events at The New York Public Library may be photographed or recorded. By attending these events, you consent to the use of your image and voice by the Library for all purposes.

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from Eater New York:

Le Perigord Shutters After 53 Years to De-Unionize

Owner Georges Briguet plans to reopen it as a new restaurant later this year

Update: Local 100 organizer Mike Feld tells Eater that he’s been negotiating with Briguet since last year, and the owner’s been clear that he’s not happy with the increases.…

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Annual New York Antiquarian Book Fair

Friday Through Sunday, March 9th-March 12th.

Over 200 American and International Exhibitors.

Preview

Thur March 9  5-9pm

Open Hours

Fri March 10    noon-8pm

Sat March 11    noon-7pm

Sun March 12  noon-5pm

Discovery Day, Sunday, 1pm-3pm

Bring a treasure to be evaluated by our experts! Free with paid admission to the Fair.

Ticket Prices

Preview Pass

$50 (includes one daily re-admission)

Daily Admission $25

Students $10 (with valid ID)

Student tickets only available at the door

Run of Show: $40

Park Avenue Armory
643 Park Avenue, New York
Between 66/67 Streets

 The Armory’s 55,000 square foot drill hall, reminiscent of the original Grand Central Depot and the great train sheds of Europe, remains one of the largest unobstructed spaces of its kind in New York. A marvel of engineering in its time, it was designed by Regiment veteran and architect Charles W. Clinton, later a partner of Clinton & Russell, architects of the Apthorp Apartments and the famed, now demolished, Astor Hotel.

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from MCNY.com, “Welcome To Fear City” screening of short films from the 1970s-80s in NYC

…”Savor this 16mm snapshot of the period, featuring four rarely-screened short films from the period. The films will be introduced by Will Hermes, senior critic for Rolling Stone, frequent contributor to NPR’s “All Things Considered,” and author of Love Goes to Buildings on Fire: Five Years in New York That Changed Music Forever, who is currently writing a biography of Lou Reed.

Sodom and Gomorrah, New York, 10036
Rudy Burckhardt, 1976, 6.25 min 
At the age of 62, in the year of Travis Bickle, one of New York’s great photographic chroniclers, turned his slyly responsive camera-eye on the city’s booming sex industry at 8th avenue and 42nd street. The result, like all Burckhardt’s work, is a lyrical impression of a time and place.

A Sense of Pride: Hamilton Heights
Monica J. Freeman, 1977, 15 min
Monica J. Freeman’s serene portrait of Hamilton Heights at the peak of its brownstone revival is a testament to the cohesion and spirit of an African-American middle class fighting hard for its place in a depressed city, and, in the process, returning a grand old neighborhood to its rightful splendor.

Punking Out
Maggi Carson, Juliusz Kossakowski & Ric Shore, 1978, 23 min
In 1977, three NYU film students ventured into the bowels of CBGB, returning with this snapshot of the venue in full flower. Intercutting brief glimpses of the Ramones, Dead Boys, and the Voidoids doing their worst, and disarmingly raw, unguarded interviews with band members and patrons alike, this may be the definitive punk document.

Electric Boogie
Tana Ross & Freke Vuijst, 1983, 34 min
Centered around a group of four black and Puerto Rican youths dubbed the Electric Boogie Boys, this short documentary from a pair of European filmmakers is a seminal portrait of the South Bronx break dancing scene.

Includes Museum admission and complimentary beer provided by Sixpoint Brewery.

Smile, It’s Your Close Up, our nonfiction film series co-programmed with Jessica Green and Edo Choi of the Maysles Documentary Center, zooms in on key moments, individuals, and communities to pose the question: “What makes New York New York?” Each program includes an introduction or conversation with filmmakers or other notable guests.

$15 for adults | $12 for seniors, students & educators (with ID) | $10 for Museum and Maysles Documentary Center members.

 

Attention, Members, to receive your discount, click on the “Buy Tickets” button above, then sign in to your account on the ticketing page.

Groups of 10 or more get discounts and priority seating, email or call us at programs@mcny.org or 917-492-3395.

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Sun 12 2016 , by

Jim’s Shoe Repair

Old-School Charm at Jim’s Shoe Repair

from The New York Times: On a recent Thursday afternoon, Jim’s Shoe Repair, at 50 East 59th Street between Park and Madison, was packed. Customers — surrounded by old-school shoeshine chairs with brass pedestals and other objects from bygone eras like an oversize gold register from the 1940s — waited to speak with Joe Rocco, 58, or his son Andrew Rocco, 27. Interactions were unhurried and convivial.

Michael Kahn, a substitute teacher who lives on the West Side of Manhattan, was there to collect his too-tight black sandals he had taken in for stretching. He saw Joe, smiled, and asked, “How’re you doing Joe?” Handing Mr. Kahn his sandals, Joe said, “All good here, and always good to see you.”

Mr. Kahn went to try them on in an individual waiting booth, one of six vintage seating areas, each with a padded chair and a half-door. The booths, lined up against the wall, were part of the original store, which used to be just across the street. Vito Rocco, Joe’s grandfather and an Italian immigrant, opened it in 1932, and it has remained a family business.

The sandals were still lightly snug, and more stretching was needed. But a return trip didn’t seem to bother Mr. Kahn. “I’ve been coming in since 1970,” he said, “and I come for the company as much as I do for the craftsmanship.” …

It was in 2014 when the adjoining Duane Reade was set to expand into the shop. A longtime customer and lawyer, Bill Brewer, organized an effort to save the place. In early 2015, Joe signed a new eight-year lease. “Shutting the store would mean saying goodbye to my grandfather’s dream,” Joe said.

That dream — owning a cobbler shop with the highest quality repairs — came to fruition for Vito Rocco over 80 years ago. He called it Jim’s, thinking an American name would bring in more business than a shop named Vito’s. It moved to its current location in 1940 and now handles a few thousand pairs of shoes at a time, with the help of 10 craftsmen.

Joe’s father, also named Joe, now 86, works part time attending to customers while his aunt Cordelia, 82, handles the register. Meanwhile, the next generation is training to take over: Andrew’s two younger brothers, Thomas, 20, and Joey, 19, come in on school breaks and some Saturdays.

A few days later, Giovanna Federico-Becker, a jeweler from TriBeCa who discovered Jim’s six months ago, waited patiently in a line that extended to the door. “This is a genuine place that’s not trying to be fancy, and my shoes come out of here looking like I just bought them,” she said. “I’m new here, but I consider myself a regular.”

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from NYPL:

The Landmarks of New York: An Illustrated, Comprehensive Record of New York City’s Historic Buildings, with Barbaralee Diamonstein-Spielvogel, chairwoman of New York State Council on the Arts and author of 23 books.

Tuesday, December 6, 2016, 6:30 p.m.

Program Locations:

Fully accessible to wheelchairs
First come, first served

This illustrated lecture showcases New York City’s architectural history and richness, surveying a broad range of styles and building types: colonial farmhouses, Gilded Age mansions, churches, schools, libraries, museums, and the great twentieth-century skyscrapers that are recognized throughout the world.

Events at The New York Public Library may be photographed or recorded. By attending these events, you consent to the use of your image and voice by the Library for all purposes.

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from The NY Post:

Carnegie Deli will close at end of 2016

The Carnegie Deli, a New York institution since 1937, will soon serve its last “Woody Allen.”

The iconic home to gigantic Jewish-style sandwiches — like the 4-inch-high, pastrami-and-corned beef “Woody” on rye — will close its doors forever on Dec. 31, The Post has learned.

Restaurant owner Marian Harper Levine tearfully broke the news to 60 heartbroken employees on Friday morning.

Levine, 65, said, “At this stage of my life, the early mornings to late nights have taken a toll, along with my sleepless nights and grueling hours that come with operating a restaurant business.”

“I’m very sad to close the Carnegie Deli but I’ve reached the time of my life when I need to take a step back,” Levine said. Her family has owned the Carnegie since 1976.

The news will sadden New Yorkers who loved Carnegie Deli’s belt-popping sandwiches and kitschy confines, which boast hundreds of photos of mostly forgotten celebrities — and nostalgia to spare.

In a New York Post essay in December 2015, when the place was temporarily closed following a gas leak, Ted Merwin, author of “Pastrami on Rye: An Overstuffed History of the Jewish Deli,” wrote:

“Since 1937, the Carnegie’s skyscraper sandwiches and obnoxious waiters encapsulated the very ethos of excess that characterized New York as a whole.”

Merwin said it would be “tragic” for the city if the Carnegie didn’t reopen.

Unlike at some other famous restaurants that recently closed, Levine had no landlord to blame — she owns the six-story building at 854 Seventh Ave. between West 54th and 55th streets.

But the Carnegie, and Marian, were long under strain.

The dining room shrank when Levine lost her lease on annex space in a building next door a few years ago.

She went through a bitter divorce from ex-husband “Sandy” Levine, who carried on a long-term affair with a former waitress and allegedly stole Carnegie’s pastrami and cheesecake recipes. The recipes were allegedly then used in the girlfriend’s family’s restaurant in Bangkok, Thailand.

Two years ago, the restaurant was ordered by a federal court to fork over $2.6 million in back wages to employees who were cheated out of proper pay — which Marian blamed on her ex-husband, whom she accused of embezzlement.

Then, in April 2015, the city shut the Carnegie Deli down for nine months over an illegal gas hookup — which Marian also blamed on Sandy.

The divorce was settled out of court. Terms were not revealed.

Carnegie Deli reopened last February with sidewalk hawkers dressed as pickles. It drew lines around the block and Mayor Bill de Blasio tweeted a celebratory photo of a pastrami sandwich.

But now the matzo ball soup’s run dry.

Levine will continue to license Carnegie Deli outposts in Las Vegas and Bethlehem, Pa., as well as at some sports venues.

“Moving forward, Marian Harper hopes to keep her father’s legacy alive by focusing on licensing the iconic Carnegie Deli brand and selling their world-famous products for wholesale distribution,” said her spokesperson, Cristyne Nicholas.

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