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New York City in the 1980s

Thursday Oct 19, 2017
7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

POWERHOUSE @ the Archway
28 Adams Street (Corner of Adams & Water Street @ the Archway)
Brooklyn , NY 11201

powerHouse Book Launch: STREET: New York City – 70s, 80s, 90s by Carrie Boretz — in conversation w/ Mark Bussell

 

RSVP appreciated:

Please fill out the “Bookings” form at the bottom of this page.

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PLEASE NOTE: Submitting an RSVP for this event DOES NOT guarantee entrance. This is a free-access event — entrance will be on a first-come, first-served basis.


 

About the Book:

The photographs in Street were taken by Carrie Boretz in New York City from the mid 1970s through the 1990s. It is common knowledge that the city was on rocky ground for many of those years but these are not pictures filled with drama or strife. Instead Boretz was always more interested in the subtle and familiar moments of everyday life in the various neighborhoods where she lived, before much of the graffiti was scrubbed away and the city sanitized and reborn to what it has since become.

For so many living in and visiting New York today, it is forgotten or altogether not known how different so many parts of the city were during that time. Many of these pictures show the reality of the streets then, where every day workers, the homeless, the affluent, and tourists all shared the common space, providing examples of how one of the greatest cities in the world was one often filled with contradictions. But there is also a timeless element to these images as children still play in the parks, streets, and schoolyards, commuters still face the elements daily as they wait, there are still regular demonstrations and parades, and the whole spectrum of the joys and pitfalls of humanity are still visible most anywhere a person looks.

For Boretz nothing was scripted, it all played out right before her. As Patti Smith said, “You need no rationale, no schooling. It’s love at first sight. You see something and you have to capture it. Instinctive, bang, you feel one with it.” Indeed, Boretz doesn’t have a philosophy about shooting other than trusting her instinct: she saw, she shot, she moved on, always looking for moments that made her heart beat faster. It was the continual rush of knowing that at any time she could come upon something real and beautiful. That is why and how she shot and why and how her Street is so special.

 

About the Photographer:

After graduating in 1975 from Washington University in St. Louis Carrie Boretz began her life as a New York City photographer a week later, landing an internship at the Village Voice. Over the next decade she photographed for The New York Times MagazineNew YorkSports Illustrated, People, Fortune, and Life. By the 1990s she was shooting almost daily for the New York Times‘s “Day” beat, one picture that revealed a slice of the city on that particular day.…

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From huck magazine:

The photographer who defined old-school cool

Street symphony

Posted
Text by Alex King
Photography © Jamal Shabazz

Jamel Shabazz has spent his life documenting the city that never sleeps. But while his shots of urban street style have become iconic, the bigger picture – a world of police and prostitutes, drifters and dancers – reveals something much deeper: a commitment to community.

It’s early morning in Rikers Island jail and a young corrections officer named Jamel Shabazz has just begun his first inspection. The residential wing is so hot that the stench of stale cigarettes and dead rodents hangs heavily.

There is a line of 30 units on both sides of the corridor, each one of them holding a juvenile inmate who may have trashed his cell, retreated to a corner or hung himself with a bed sheet.

“To make a physical count, you have to make sure a body is in each cell,” Jamel explains. And there is an abundance of bodies.

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It’s the mid-1980s and a crack epidemic is sweeping through New York City, generating a wave of violence that’s carrying thousands of young black men into the city’s prisons and morgues.

“It felt like being in a lifeboat watching a sinking ship and you can only help so many people,” says Jamel, thinking back to that time.

“But it didn’t stop me from going to work every single day looking for someone to connect with and provide direction to.”

Working in prison made Jamel’s mission clear to him: he became determined to steer young men away from ruining their lives, feeding a vicious cycle of regret. And it didn’t take long for him to realise how he’d do that.

Jamel_Shabazz_Little_Big_Man
Think of old-school hip hop and, chances are, you will conjure up one of Jamel Shabazz’s unforgettable portraits. Jamel came of age during the birth of rap in mid-70s New York. He remembers block parties in Coffey Park, Brooklyn, where a group of DJs and MCs would “hot-wire” the electricity supply of a lamppost to keep the party going long into the night.

His photobook Back in the Days immortalises the b-boys, boomboxes and big hair of 1980s New York City in one cornerstone document. But the purpose behind these images has often gone overlooked.

“I don’t get caught up on the fashion,” he says. “My photographs have always been about the personal connections I make in my attempt to communicate what’s going on in the streets.”

Rush-Hour-2
Jamel’s new book, Sights in the City, aims to redress that balance by showcasing his street photography in one place for the first time. It spans the duration of his career and illuminates the complex city that has defined his life.

Growing up in the Red Hook area of Brooklyn, Jamel discovered photography through his father, a naval combat photographer who taught him to carry a loaded camera at all times.

Initially borrowing his mother’s cheap Kodak, the 15-year-old began directing groups of his friends into poses and developing a signature style.

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Date

Sep 6, 2017 • 7:00 PM – 9:00 PM

Cost

FREE and OPEN TO THE PUBLIC!

Location

Gallery at BRIC House

647 Fulton Street
(Enter on Rockwell Place)
Brooklyn, NY 11217

United States
Get Directions

Sergio Purtell, courtesy of the artist and Art 3 Gallery, Brooklyn

JOIN US FOR THE OPENING RECEPTION!

EXHIBITION ON VIEW: September 7 – October 29, 2017

CURATED BY: Elizabeth Ferrer

 

Brooklyn Photographs brings together the work of 11 photographers who have turned their lens on the Brooklyn experience from the late 1960s to the present.  Each of these photographers will present a body of work on a specific theme – childhood in Williamsburg in the 1960s, Halloween in the 1970s, or Bushwick street life in the 1980s, to name a few.  More recent work from the last decade will explore such subjects as the rapidly gentrifying post-industrial landscape, Brooklyn artists, and the microcosm of street life visible near BRIC’s facility at the intersection of Fulton and Flatbush.  In sum, the exhibition will illuminate the important role that photography has had in preserving aspects of Brooklyn’s neighborhoods and traditions, and in documenting the extraordinary cultural and social diversity that is a hallmark of the borough.  It will also reflect the borough as a site of continual change. Neighborhoods transform and new populations emerge, while the essence of Brooklyn’s humanity remains. The exhibition will be accompanied by a catalogue and by public programs.

Photographers include: Yolanda Andrade, Stefanie Apple, Nelson Bakerman, Leigh Davis, Max Kozloff, George Malave, Meryl Meisler, Patrick D. Pagnano, Sergio Purtell, Larry Racioppo, and Russell Frederick .

READ ABOUT THE EXHIBITION IN THE NEW YORK TIMES LENS BLOG >>

Special thanks to Duggal Visual Solutions, Griffin Editions, and Pranayama Art for their services in relation to this exhibition.

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Howl Happening Opening Night Sept. 10th

Sep. 10 – Oct. 06, 2017
56 Bleecker Gallery and Late 80s New York
Presented by Some Serious Business
and Howl! Happening: An Arturo Vega Project

Lust of glory pricked their hearts up, dread of shame
Struck them tame;
And that glory and that shame alike, the gold
Bought and sold.
-Robert Browning, Love Among The Ruins

Let’s also say that change is neither good or bad. It simply is. It can be greeted with terror or joy. A tantrum that says, ‘I want it the way it was’ or a dance that says, ‘Look, it’s something new.’
–Don Draper, Mad Men (AMC)

Some Serious Business and Howl! Happening are pleased to present Love Among The Ruins, co-curated by Susan Martin, founding director of Some Serious Business; Bill Stelling, 56 Bleecker gallery director and founder of the groundbreaking FUN Gallery with Patti Astor; and artist Maynard Monrow. All three curators were close friends of Dean Rolston, co-owner of 56 Bleecker who serves as inspiration for the exhibition.

Artists in this retrospective include:
Austė, Suzanne Anker, Donald Baechler, Sylvie Ball, Jean-Michel Basquiat, Julian Beck, Bill Beckley, Mike Berg, John Bowman, Jeff Carpenter, Stefano Castronovo, George Condo, Arch Connelly, Bruce Conner, Scott Covert, Ingrid Dinter, Arnold Fern, Vincent Gallo, Graham Gillmore, Allen Ginsberg, Nan Goldin, Eric Goode, Robert Hawkins, Roberto Juarez, Scott Kilgour, Ruth Kligman, Norman Korpi, Joyce Kozloff, Tseng Kwong Chi, David LaChapelle, Greer Lankton, Claire Lieberman, Daniel Mahoney, Frank Majore, Fidel Márquez, Sylvia Martins, McDermott & McGough, Taylor Mead, Nicholas Mouffarrege, David Nelson, Felix Pène du Bois, Jeff Perrone, Elizabeth Peyton, William Rand, Elaine Reicheck, Rene Ricard, Bill Rice, Alexis Rockman, Nicolas Rule, Vittorio Scarpati, Bruno Schmidt, Jo Shane, Mark Sink, Stephen Sprouse, Ken Tisa, Noel Vietor, William Wegman, Dondi White, Martin Wong, Thomas Woodruff, and Jimmy Wright.

56 Bleecker Gallery held a unique position in the late 80’s art world. Part serious gallery, part happening, the space was a scene that reflected the explosive intersection of art, performance, music, fashion and the incredible nightlife culture of that era.

Featuring many of the most cutting edge artists of the time, such as Stephen Sprouse and David LaChapelle, it also presented rigorously serious shows of artists like Bruce Conner and Elaine Reichek. The space was a forum for nightclub impresario Eric Goode to produce an installation that was a window into his future endeavors. Taylor Mead directed the gallery’s historic performance of Jackie Curtis’ Glamour, Glory and Gold featuring legendary actors Ondine, John Heys, Penny Arcade, Harry Koutoukas and Margot Howard-Howard.

56 Bleecker was a ‘scene’ as much as a venue for art. Openings featured guests as diverse as Stavros Niarchos, Richard Gere, Lauren Hutton, Fab 5 Freddy and Henry Geldzahler. Rene Ricard held court in the famous ‘Tin Room,’ anointing those in favor and banishing his enemies to NoHo Star.

While it was a time of enormous creativity, it was also one of deep sorrow. The exhibition will touch upon the impact of AIDS on our community.

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From silive.com:

Developer files plans to build on site of 90-year-old Staten Island church

This 1983 photo from the Advance archives shows the original Holy Rosary R.C. Church and adjacent rectory on Sand Lane in South Beach. A developer has filed plans to demolish the church and rectory and build eight semi- attached homes on the property. (Staten Island Advance)
This 1983 photo from the Advance archives shows the original Holy Rosary R.C. Church and adjacent rectory on Sand Lane in South Beach. A developer has filed plans to demolish the church and rectory and build eight semi- attached homes on the property. (Staten Island Advance)
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STATEN ISLAND, N.Y. — A Staten Island developer has filed plans to build eight semi-attached homes on the site of the original Holy Rosary R.C. Church in South Beach.

According to Building Department records, Mitchell Pacifico, a principal of Mp Realty Holding Corp., Travis, who is listed as owner, plans to build eight semi-attached homes over four 45 x 100 lots on Sand Lane.

The lots would be sub-divided from the original parcel at 207 Sand Lane, and the church and adjacent rectory on the site demolished.

Pacifico said he bid on the property after seeing it for sale on the Multiple Listing Service (MLS). He would not disclose the amount, but public records indicate the property sold for $1.5 million.

The new construction would be marketed as Sand Lane Estates. Peter Calvanico, of Calvanico Associates, Willowbrook, is listed as the architect for the project.

Pacifico described the project as “high end” three-bedroom semi-attached homes, with full basements, each with a living room, dining room and eat-in-kitchen. He said construction could begin by early spring.

The 90-year-old stucco and wood-frame church, built by hand by Italian immigrants, is located two blocks from the Franklin Delano Roosevelt Boardwalk in South Beach. It served as a neighborhood mobilization center during Hurricane Sandy in 2012, but has not been used for mass since 2015, according to the Rev. Michael Martine, pastor of Holy Rosary.

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According to the pastor, the church suffered heavy water damage in March 2016 when the original pipes burst, causing water to damage the ceiling and walls. The building was deemed irreparable.

Father Martine said the proceeds from the sale “will greatly improve the financial position of our parish.” He said the money would go toward retiring the debt the parish incurred with the building of the new Holy Rosary Church, at 120 Jerome Ave., in the early 1990s, as well as the Father Dominic Epifano Parish Center across the street, that was built a few years later, in early 2000s. A new boiler will also be purchased for the adjacent Holy Rosary School, which was built in the 1950s.

Holy Rosary has preserved and restored an original hand-carved wooden crucifix as well as a fresco painting that was displayed over the altar in the Sand Lane church. Both are now in the daily mass chapel of the Jerome Avenue church.

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From “off the Grid”, website of the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation:

The Glittering and Gritty History of 24 Bond

If you happen to look up while strolling down Bond or Lafayette Streets, you might come upon a curious sight – dozens of small, golden statues dancing along the wrought iron and brick of a traditional NoHo facade. Celebratory and airy, they’re a delightful addition to the heavy, industrial look of the rest of the area. Who do we have to thank for this artistic juxtaposition? Artist and 24 Bond resident Bruce Williams.

Williams and his wife have lived in the building for over twenty years, and he first began adorning his building’s facade in 1998. At the time, the NoHo neighborhood was much more off the beaten path than now, a small enclave for artists working in a variety of mediums. Since then, the neighborhood has gained quite a bit more distinction, glamour, and recognition. In 2008, 24 Bond Street was included in the NoHo Historic District Extension, officially recognizing the architectural significance of this 19th-century building. To celebrate, Williams added additional golden sculptures climbing up the side of his now-landmarked building. He did this, as he had always done, without asking for approval, but the new landmark status of his building required that he confer with the LPC. Despite a small ado requiring an official hearing on the outdoor art, the spritely statues were permitted to stay.

But those sculptures aren’t the only piece of artistic legacy at 24 Bond. Robert Mapplethorpe occupied a studio on the fifth floor of 24 Bond from the 1970s until his death in 1989. In this cavernous space, Mapplethorpe would invite his subjects to “do drugs, have sex, and then be photographed.” 24 Bond was infamous – Edward Mapplethorpe, Robert’s brother, said it was “so sexually charged that you needed to be pretty certain of who you were to be around it on a day-to-day basis.” Mapplethorpe photographed legions of downtown superstars in his NoHo loft, including frequent collaborator Patti Smith. It was here that they filmed 1978’s “Still Moving” which appeared at the Stephen Miller Gallery and was Smith and Mapplethorpe’s only joint exhibition.

Patti Smith, taken by Robert Mapplethorpe. It is believed that this photo is taken on Mapplethorpe’s 5th floor studio at 24 Bond.

The same year that Mapplethorpe died, the Gene Frankel Theatre moved into the ground floor of the Bond Street building. Already a well-regarded theater with serious Village bonafides, once at 24 Bond the theater nurtured the careers of burgeoning actors and exhibited bold and progressive works. Although Frankel himself died in 2005, the theater still operates out of the ground floor space, advancing its mission to nurture living playwrights and artists and to “revive NoHo as a cauldron of LGBTQI art and ideas by producing new works.”

Considering the building’s long legacy as an arts space, those gold dancers on the facade seem to fit right in.

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From Jeremiah’s Vanishing New York blog:

Monday, July 31, 2017

Before We Got Starfucked

Jen Fisher runs a well-loved book table on the sidewalk at St. Mark’s and Avenue A. Tomorrow, the table will become a memorial exhibit called “Before we got Starfucked: A Memorial for the Lower East Side before it became the East Village.”

Jen and the resident artist Ana Marton describe it as:

“A personal archive of a LES resident from the late 80s to early 90s of photographs, newspaper cuts, flyers and B&W Xerox books will be displayed on Tuesday, August 1st, 2017 from 530-8PM outside, on the corner of Ave A and St. Mark’s Place, where the bookstall usually is.

The archive is based on 80s and 90s events such as The Tent City in Tompkins Square Park, the annual Stations of the Cross, Father George Kuhn, and the fight against gentrification as it was recorded and put together by a resident of the Lower East Side. Seen in the light of today’s ongoing destruction of our neighborhood, we believe that this archive has acquired historical relevance as a record of the Lower East Side and the life it once contained.”

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From Gothamist:

A Look At 1980s NYC Through The Lens Of A Teenager

Through the magical and bittersweet filter of nostalgia, it’s possible to look back at photos of 1980s New York City—a decade that followed one of the toughest in the city’s history—and think: ah, the good ol’ days. Recent transplants will say it, speaking some pseudo-knowledge and pointing to the dearth of combination Chase Bank-Duane Reades on the streets back then. But those who lived it know exactly what they miss.

Native Ken Stein has just shared some of his old photos from the decade with us, taken from 1980 through 1989. Stein was a teenager when he took most of these, and tells us, “The city was different back then. I think it was quieter, the street lights were darker, there was more room to walk and more places to wander—often everything seemed new and the different areas of the city were just that; different.”

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1983. (Photo by Ken Stein)

Stein continued:

Most of those images were shot in 1982 and 83. I was 17 and 18 year old and was the staff photographer for a weekly community newspaper in The Bronx.These images are part of a larger collection that were shot on slide film—a rare luxury for me because it was far more expensive than the black & white I could get and develop for free. Hugh Bell, the famous jazz era and commercial photographer who died after Sandy knocked out the electricity in lower Manhattan, was a huge influence on me.

Taking pictures was always thrilling and I loved the way it made me feel. It felt at times I was the only one taking pictures—I think that’s why people let me take their photos. It was a rare occurrence and I was bold as fuck back then.

Click through for a look, and you can check out a few more on his Flickr page.

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from MCNY.com, “Welcome To Fear City” screening of short films from the 1970s-80s in NYC

…”Savor this 16mm snapshot of the period, featuring four rarely-screened short films from the period. The films will be introduced by Will Hermes, senior critic for Rolling Stone, frequent contributor to NPR’s “All Things Considered,” and author of Love Goes to Buildings on Fire: Five Years in New York That Changed Music Forever, who is currently writing a biography of Lou Reed.

Sodom and Gomorrah, New York, 10036
Rudy Burckhardt, 1976, 6.25 min 
At the age of 62, in the year of Travis Bickle, one of New York’s great photographic chroniclers, turned his slyly responsive camera-eye on the city’s booming sex industry at 8th avenue and 42nd street. The result, like all Burckhardt’s work, is a lyrical impression of a time and place.

A Sense of Pride: Hamilton Heights
Monica J. Freeman, 1977, 15 min
Monica J. Freeman’s serene portrait of Hamilton Heights at the peak of its brownstone revival is a testament to the cohesion and spirit of an African-American middle class fighting hard for its place in a depressed city, and, in the process, returning a grand old neighborhood to its rightful splendor.

Punking Out
Maggi Carson, Juliusz Kossakowski & Ric Shore, 1978, 23 min
In 1977, three NYU film students ventured into the bowels of CBGB, returning with this snapshot of the venue in full flower. Intercutting brief glimpses of the Ramones, Dead Boys, and the Voidoids doing their worst, and disarmingly raw, unguarded interviews with band members and patrons alike, this may be the definitive punk document.

Electric Boogie
Tana Ross & Freke Vuijst, 1983, 34 min
Centered around a group of four black and Puerto Rican youths dubbed the Electric Boogie Boys, this short documentary from a pair of European filmmakers is a seminal portrait of the South Bronx break dancing scene.

Includes Museum admission and complimentary beer provided by Sixpoint Brewery.

Smile, It’s Your Close Up, our nonfiction film series co-programmed with Jessica Green and Edo Choi of the Maysles Documentary Center, zooms in on key moments, individuals, and communities to pose the question: “What makes New York New York?” Each program includes an introduction or conversation with filmmakers or other notable guests.

$15 for adults | $12 for seniors, students & educators (with ID) | $10 for Museum and Maysles Documentary Center members.

 

Attention, Members, to receive your discount, click on the “Buy Tickets” button above, then sign in to your account on the ticketing page.

Groups of 10 or more get discounts and priority seating, email or call us at programs@mcny.org or 917-492-3395.

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From a facebook posting by Michael Cala:
“I’m very pleased, as a first-time applicant, to announce that I was just awarded a sizable grant from Staten Island Arts to mount an exhibition of my vintage Coney Island photographs (1970-1980). The exhibition will hopefully take place some time in mid-2017. Got some great people on board to help with printing and mounting. And the initial exhibit will be held at the Garibaldi-Meucci Museum.” …

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