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NYC subway system

Join author and transit expert Oscar Israelowitz for a conversation about the quirks and historic significance of the 469 stations in the New York City subway system. Israelowitz will share highlights from his new book, Secrets of the New York City Subways, an illustrated guide to each station in the system including work from prominent artists like Roy Lichtenstein, Heins & Lafarge, the Guastavino brothers, and Squire Vickers. Book signing to follow. (Adult tickets $10 online.) At the New York City Transit Museum.…

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from the NYC MTA: MTA New York City Transit, NY Transit Museum Ring in Holidays with Vintage Buses, Subways

Vintage Train

MTA New York City Transit and the New York Transit Museum are putting extra magic on the tracks with the Metropolitan Transportation Authority’s annual holiday tradition of rides to the past via its vintage fleet of buses and subway trains – and the chance for transit fans to buy museum merchandise at a special station pop-up shop.

The holiday nostalgia fleet includes subway cars from the 1930s and buses from the late 1940s to the 1980s. The New York Transit Museum typically displays these vehicles during special events at the museum or around the city, but are offering these holiday nostalgia rides to the public for a limited time with the swipe of a MetroCard. Some vintage buses also will be on display at Union Square, Herald Square and at the Circle Line Terminal.

For four consecutive Sundays in December, subway customers can catch the “Shoppers Special,” a train consisting of eight cars from the 1930s that ran along the lettered lines until the late 1970s. The cars, which were ordered for the Independent Subway System (IND), were the first subway cars to be identified by their contract numbers, hence the R1/9 designations. R1/9 cars, known as ““City-Cars,” have rattan seats, ceiling fans, incandescent light bulbs, and roll signs for passenger information. Their design of more doors that were also wider and faster, plus increased standing capacity to accommodate crowds, served as the model of modern subway cars, and their dimensions are identical to the latest R160 cars. They were retired from service in 1977.

“For all intents and purposes, this was the first modern subway car and today’s subway fleets owe a lot to the design,” said Joe Leader, Senior Vice President of Subways. “They were basic, durable and offered the expected levels of customer comfort for decades after they were introduced into service. We continue to build upon this strong foundation with each new car design.”

The “Shoppers Special” will run from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on December 6, 13, 20, and 27, making local stops on the 6 Av Line from Queens Plaza to 2 Av. The first run of the day departs from 2 Av, where a special museum pop-up shop will be open every Sunday during the holiday nostalgia rides.

MTA NYC Transit is also putting a fleet of vintage buses on the M42 route for weekday daytime service between November 30 and December 18. The buses, which will operate between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., will only be available weather permitting. The vintage fleet will not operate in rainy, snowy or icy conditions.

This year’s holiday nostalgia buses were manufactured by General Motors, Mack and Flexible, three major firms that no longer manufacture buses.

“Seeing these vintage buses in service again is always a nostalgic event for many New Yorkers. My father and I drove some of these buses, which makes this an especially personal event for me,” said Darryl Irick, President of MTA Bus Company and Senior Vice President New York City Transit Department of Buses.

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from Spoiled NYC: MTA Just Announced Vintage Subways and Buses Will Run Over the Holiday Season in NYC

Because it’s officially the holiday season in New York City, there’s news of this from the wonderful folks over at the MTA:

“For four consecutive Sundays in December, subway customers can catch the “Shoppers Special,” a train consisting of eight cars from the 1930s that ran along the lettered lines until the late 1970s.

The cars, which were ordered for the Independent Subway System (IND), were the first subway cars to be identified by their contract numbers, hence the R1/9 designations.

R1/9 cars, known as ““City-Cars,” have rattan seats, ceiling fans, incandescent light bulbs, and roll signs for passenger information.

Their design of more doors that were also wider and faster, plus increased standing capacity to accommodate crowds, served as the model of modern subway cars, and their dimensions are identical to the latest R160 cars. They were retired from service in 1977.”

“For all intents and purposes, this was the first modern subway car and today’s subway fleets owe a lot to the design,” said Joe Leader, Senior Vice President of Subways.

“They were basic, durable and offered the expected levels of customer comfort for decades after they were introduced into service. We continue to build upon this strong foundation with each new car design.”

Is it just us or do these holiday trains actually make the price of subway ride less… painful on our minds (and wallets)?…

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 From New York Adventure Club:

November 15, 2015

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Corey William Schneider

South Bronx neighborhood Mott Haven, named after iron works owner Jordan Mott, who purchased the land in 1849, has been home to a range of industries throughout the 19th and 20th centuries including metal works, stone yards, and even pianos. While these manufacturing buildings and facilities are no longer in operation, many historic buildings and infrastructure projects still exist if you know where to look:

#1 – The Mott Haven East Historic District

Located on East 139th and East 140th between Willis and Brooks Avenues, these sets of William O’Gorman & William rowhouses date back to 1877, making them one of the oldest rowhouse developments in the Bronx. Many of the houses have a range of architectural styles including Dutch/Flemish pediments.

#2 – 404–450 East 142nd Street

Located on the south side of East 142nd between Willis and Brooks Avenues, these 42 neo-Grec rowhouses designed by William O’Gorman date back to 1897. While they were originally built of brick with stone ornaments, many are now an array of bright and bold colors.

#3 – United Methodist Church

Located on the corner of 141st Street and Willis Avenue, United Methodist Church, originally called Willis Avenue Methodist Episcopal Church, was built in 1900 by George W. Kramer. This 100+ year old Gothic Revial church still boasts impressive colored stained glass, so don’t forget to look up!

#4 – St. Ann’s Church

Located at 295 St. Ann’s Avenue, St. Ann’s Church and Graveyard was constructed in 1840 by Gouverneur Morris, Jr. as a family memorial on his rural estate (before Jordan Haven purchased the land in 1849). As the oldest church still standing in the Bronx, it contains many of the Morris family members including Gouverneur Morris, Sr., Judge Lewis Morris (first Governor of New Jersey), and Major General Lewis Morris (member of the Continental Congress and signer of the Declaration of Independence).

#5 – Abandoned South Bronx Rail Line

Located from East 163rd Street to East 141st Street by the waterfront (picture taken from Southern Blvd near 142nd Street), the abandoned South Bronx Rail Line’s next life is a current topic of debate, with Bronx Borough President Ruben Diaz Jr. arguing that the site should be turned into a new “lowline” park. Since this strip of vacant land won’t be redeveloped anytime soon, you’ll have plenty of time to visit this 20 block stretch filled with fantastic graffiti, and not so fantastic trash.

Bonus – Mott Haven Substation

Located at 380 Southern Blvd (and boardered by Brucker Avenue and 144th Street), the Mott Haven Substation, operated by Con Edison, is easily mistaken as a gated townhouse community by locals and passersby alike. The aesthetically pleasing concealment of this enormous four story, 125,000 square foot facility, earned it the “Best Manufacturing Facility” title by the Precast / Prestressed Concrete Institute Northeast Covering New England and New York.

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mott haven

bronx

things to see

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Just like our talks we thought we’d keep this snappy:

  • A simple and relaxed evening that’s open to anyone interested in the quirkier side of life
  • Four curated speakers have ten minutes to give insightful, informative and informal presentations
  • Each month is as random as it comes, there are no set themes or topics for the evening.

Since launching in London in May 2013 over 75 speakers have taken to The Greenwich Series stage. We have heard about the possibility of parallel universes from an astronomer, we’ve myth busted the Freemasons and then had a pirate spook us with local ghost stories. Oh and this was all on one night!

 

Next Event

27th October

6.30pm Doors, 7pm Show

Jimmy’s No 43, 43 E 7th St

$5 on the door

*One of this month’s speakers deals with the design revolution of the mid-1960s as it was applied to the NYC subway system.


Jesse Reed

Exploring the hectic tangle of New York’s subway system was once an even more overwhelming task. A mess of signage and designs that varied station to station.

 

Then in the mid 1960’s a design revolution occurred that changed the very look of the Subway itself.

 

Jesse Reed will talk us through the process of designing how the subway’s signage looks and the successful Kickstarter project to bring that design guide back to life.

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The Subway Map: The Last 50 Years, The Next 50 Years

Tuesday, October 27, 2015, 6:00pm – 9:30pm at Cooper Union

Timed to the 111th anniversary of the opening of the New York City subway on October 27, 1904, a group of historians and designers gather for a public symposium focusing on the past and future evolution of one of New York City’s most key graphic works: the subway map. Admission is free, but reservations are requested.

During its first half-century, maps of the subway were based on the three original operating companies (IRT, BMT, IMD). Although the subway was unified in 1940, it was not until 1964 that a new basic design was put forward by R. Raleigh D’Adamo that dispensed with the historical operating companies and introduced the modern nomenclature and color-coding of subway routes. Fifty years ago, in the fall of 1965, the Transit Authority adopted D’Adamo’s design concept. The highlight of the history section of this evening will be the launch of the first digital reconstruction of Raleigh D’Adamo’s highly influential hand-drawn map of 1964, which had been lost until last year. …
Program

  • Introduction by Peter B. Lloyd: Why is the transit map an ‘ínformation design’ problem?
  • Presentation by R. Raleigh D’Adamo on how he created his 1964 map.
  • Presentation by Peter B Lloyd on how the map evolved after 1964.
  • Presentation by John Tauranac: who will show how to make today’s MTA subway map into the MTA subway map of tomorrow
  • Presentation by Eddie Jabbour on present and future transit mapping for mobile devices.
  • Panel discussion on how the subway map should evolve in the future.

RSVP

The event is free but please RSVP. Attendees who RSVP will be rewarded with a postcard print of part of Raleigh D’Adamo’s subway map (the downtown segment). This is a Limited print run of 855, available only to attendees who RSVP on Eventbrite.

Located in The Great Hall, in the Foundation Building, 7 East 7th Street, between Third and Fourth Avenues

     

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from the NYPL: http://www.nypl.org/events/programs/2015/07/09/beneath-streets-hidden-relics-new-york-citys-subway-system-matt-litwack

Author @ the Library:
Beneath the Streets: The Hidden Relics of New York City’s Subway System, with Matt Litwack, American Photographer and Graffiti Artist
Thursday, July 9, 2015, 6:30 p.m. at Mid-Manhattan Library (fully accessible to wheelchairs)
Only a handful of transit workers, daring explorers and graffiti writers have experienced the full scope of the New York subway system. Beneath the Streets reveals this world for the first time with fantastic photographs captured from throughout the tunnels and byways of the subway. Although it provides service to over 5 million riders every day, the subway is for most a sealed system. Very few of its patrons are aware of the extent of this vast underground infrastructure. The authors of Beneath the Streets first discovered this hidden world in the process of photographing graffiti found below ground in the subway system. Now their riveting documentary work opens up this subterranean maze, including 600 miles of active track as well as abandoned sections and disused stations, for all to experience.…

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From The NY Post: Confederate Flags Adorn This Times Square Subway Station

Tiny Confederate flags are right under the noses of millions of straphangers passing through the Times Square subway station every day.

The tile mosaics honor the late New York Times head Adolph S. Ochs, a Southerner with “strong ties to the Confederacy,” said Civil War historian Dr. David Jackowe.

The tiles were installed more than 90 years ago when stations were adorned with symbols to honor prominent figures — in this case, the Tennessee-raised Ochs, who was buried with a Confederate flag after his death in 1935.

But commuters are disgusted, especially after last week’s slaughter at a Charleston, South Carolina, church allegedly by Dylann Roof, a Confederate flag-waving racist.

“As a black man, it’s insulting, and it’s racist,” said Cain Steed, 38. “It hurts. It shouldn’t be represented here.”

Isjad Choudary, 20, also wanted them gone.

“Erase! Done!” the student said. “With what just happened, you can see it’s still influencing racist behavior. No way! Kaput!”

Erwin Minerve, 42, said: “Take it down! I want my son to be aware because it’s history, but I don’t want it to be blatantly plastered in our face in the subway like that.”

Although born in Ohio, Ochs had ties to the rebel cause, Jackowe wrote in Civil War Times in 2012.

His mom, Bertha Levi Ochs, was a charter member of the United Daughters of the Confederacy and helped smuggle spies and quinine during the war, Jackowe said.

Ochs would run editorials and pictorial editions devoted to Dixie, Jackowe wrote.

The MTA dismissed any similarity to the flag.

“It is a geometric pattern, not a flag design, and has no reference to anything beyond a pattern,” said spokesman Kevin Ortiz. “Similar patterns in other palettes of colors are found in various subway stations.”…

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A thank you to the New York Nineteenth Century Society for re-posting the following on Facebook:

Did you miss the nostalgia trains last December? You can ride them again this weekend! While they aren’t 19th-century trains (if only!), they are historic and lots of fun. Check them out on the Q and B lines between 12:00 p.m. and 4:00 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday.…

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A film noir spy thriller set in NYC during the era of anti-Communist paranoia, with many NYC themes, including the fact that the pivotal act of the film involves a pickpocketing in the NYC subway system.

from Film Forum’s webpage about their current screenings of Pickup On South Street:

(1953) “Are you waving the flag at me?,” sneers pickpocket Richard Widmark at cops and Feds on the trail of that microfilm he’s lifted on the subway from Jean Peters’ purse — after all, she was messengering it, albeit unwittingly, to the REDS! But then, in Widmark’s world, “Who cares? Your money’s as good as anybody else’s”; while professional snitch Thlema Ritter thoughtfully pulls out a price chart when called on for a fingering. (This was Ritter’s fourth straight Supporting Actress Oscar nomination —her sixth was for Birdman of Alcatraz; she never won.) Peters herself — soon to be Mrs. Howard Hughes in real life — is everybody’s patsy, blackmailed into the mule deal by sweaty ex-“boyfriend” Richard Kiley with promise of a clean final breakup, robbed twice, cold-cocked, hit with a beer-in-the-face wakeup call, and rag-dolled around an apartment; and shot. But finally, as Ritter says, “Even in our crummy line of business, you gotta draw the line somewhere.” Vintage Fuller hard-boiled pulp, with final chin-bouncing-on-each-step subway station showdown. (Released the year Stalin died, Pickup’s Cold War attitudes horrified Gallic Fuller fans; in the French dubbing, the whole thing was changed to a drug deal.) Approx. 80 min. DCP.

PICKUP ON SOUTH STREET

DAILY (except SUN)
12:402:204:005:407:209:00
SUN
2:003:405:207:008:4010:20

Friday, May 29 – Thursday, June 4

Buy Tickets
$7.50 Member$13.00 Regular

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