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NYPL

Wednesday, December 20, 2017, 6:30 p.m.

Program Locations:

Fully accessible to wheelchairs
Program is free, but advance registration is recommended. Priority will be given to those who have registered in advance.
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The oldest building in New York City, the hobbit doors of Dennet Place, a hidden museum in a Williamsburg apartment—Brooklyn is filled with secrets.

Secret Brooklyn book coverAway from the crowds and standard attractions, Brooklyn offers countless offbeat experiences. Michelle Young and Augustin Pasquet, founders of the online magazine Untapped Cities, join us for a conversation their book Secret Brooklyn: An Usual Guide.

After presenting an overview of the borough’s hidden treasures, the authors will discuss their popular website and the power of urban discovery. A Q&A follows.

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A Description of the New York Central Park, with Maureen Meister, art historian, professor, and author.

Thursday, June 15, 2017, 6:30 p.m.

Program Locations:

Fully accessible to wheelchairs
First come, first served

This illustrated lecture reintroduces readers to A Description of the New York Central Park, published in 1869 and widely considered the most important book about the park to appear during its early years.

Events at The New York Public Library may be photographed or recorded. By attending these events, you consent to the use of your image and voice by the Library for all purposes.

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from NYPL:

The Landmarks of New York: An Illustrated, Comprehensive Record of New York City’s Historic Buildings, with Barbaralee Diamonstein-Spielvogel, chairwoman of New York State Council on the Arts and author of 23 books.

Tuesday, December 6, 2016, 6:30 p.m.

Program Locations:

Fully accessible to wheelchairs
First come, first served

This illustrated lecture showcases New York City’s architectural history and richness, surveying a broad range of styles and building types: colonial farmhouses, Gilded Age mansions, churches, schools, libraries, museums, and the great twentieth-century skyscrapers that are recognized throughout the world.

Events at The New York Public Library may be photographed or recorded. By attending these events, you consent to the use of your image and voice by the Library for all purposes.

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From “What To Catch At The New York Public Library This Fall

At The Schomburg Center…”When Sugar Hill Was Sweet (September 22), a look at some of the women of Upper Manhattan’s past who have been outshined by their famous husbands, including Shirley Graham DuBois and Eslanda Goode Robeson.”…

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From “What To Catch At The New York Public Library This Fall“:

“For more information on New York City and its specific history, head to the Mid-Manhattan library for events on such wide-ranging New York topics as Soho’s gentrification (September 22), New York in the Gilded Age (November 7), Ground Zero and the Remaking of Lower Manhattan (November 8), and a celebration of subway buskers (November 14). To learn more about what makes New York City (and other cities around the world) so essential, the Stephen A. Schwarzman Building will host the lecture What Makes a Great City? on September 21. On November 2, the Schwarzman Building will also host The Well-Tempered City, a discussion on how cities can adapt to the problems of the future, including climate change, income inequality, and migration.”

 …

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The Entire History Of Photography Is Now Accessible Through An Online Database

Searchable resource contains 110,000 photographers and others involved in photographic production

Marielle Castillo

The New York Public Magazine launched an incredibly useful photographic resource. The Photographers’ Identities Catalog (PIC) is an online collection of biographical data of around 110,000 photographers, studios, dealers and others involved in photography production.

The platform covers the entire world and history of the medium, including everything from early days daguerreotypes to present day images, making it a vast and growing resource for students, historians and photography lovers.

This project has been in the making for years. For David Lowe, Photography Specialist at the New York Public Library, PIC has been central to his work at NYPL. In 2003, he began surveying and rearranging their physical collection, noting locations of their cataloged material and storing all of a photographer’s work together, arranged alphabetically.

The beautiful interface was built by the NYPL Labs team, the Library’s digital innovation unit. The map is an experimental interface that makes use of CesiumJS, a JavaScript library for 3D maps. The information was sourced from original research by the NYPL Photography staff, as well as trusted biographical dictionaries, databases, websites published by photography scholars and catalogs, as well as Wikipedia and Wikidata.

The search and filtering options are pretty impressive. A quick search for any photographer yields a great amount of information, from basic stats like dates of birth and active years, but it can also reveal more specific details, including a map of where the photographer was active, the art collections that own the photographer’s work around the world, the photographic processes used, and more. Since the search engine is equipped with many filters, PIC is also great for exploring specific interests.

While PIC is the latest online resource for photographic information, it’s not the only one. Similar databases include Yale’s Photogrammar and the NYPL’s public domain visualization tool.

The Photographers’ Identities Catalog (PIC)

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Briefly Seen, New York Street Life, with Harvey Stein, a professional photographer, teacher, lecturer, and author based in New York City.

March 9, 2016

Program Locations:

 This illustrated lecture documents the iconic areas of Midtown and Downtown Manhattan in 172 beautiful black-and-white photographs taken over 41 years, from 1974 through 2014.

Events at The New York Public Library may be photographed or recorded. By attending these events, you consent to the use of your image and voice by the Library for all purposes.

From The Village Voice:

Harvey Stein‘s black-and-white photographs of midtown Manhattan are crowded affairs: people huddled in close proximity in densely packed spaces, shoulders and necks jutting in the foreground, out-of-focus commuters charging ahead, glimpsed only fleetingly from the torso to the nose. In his two other portrait-heavy collections of New York locales (one of Coney Island, the other of Harlem), Stein often isolates one or two subjects, capturing a moment of characteristic expression. In the all-bets-are-off rush of midtown, however, any hope of a controlled environment is gone, and Stein’s goal shifts to mining split-second gestures from people in states of hurry and haste. Stein has been photographing midtown for over forty years, but between his use of wide-angle lenses (which stuff the frames with exuberant detail) and a tight, up-close perspective, his work feels removed from time — sample shots of a mad-dash energy that, despite the rapidly changing city supplying it, has remained much the same over the decades. Here, Stein reflects on these nearly two hundred images, which were published in the recent collection Briefly Seen: New York Street Life.

Photo Credit: Harvey Stein, from the book Briefly Seen: New York Street Life, published by Schiffer Publishing.

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