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photographic documentation

The page, http://www.vintag.es/2015/11/rarely-seen-autochrome-photos-of-new.html , claims to display

Rarely Seen Autochrome Photos of New York in the Early 20th Century .

The images themselves span 18 years, from the earliest one dated with the year 1900, to the last, a photo of buildings with banners and signs exhorting the public to buy war bonds, with the date given as 1918. Not all of them are from New York City, several are attributed to places in Upstate New York. Though they are lovely to look at, and a few provide a glimpse of what everyday life for everyday people looked like in the thick of NYC, some people who have written into the comments section have revealed that the provenance of the images is not in all cases what the site represented them to be: some are not genuine Autochrome images at all, but colorized photos or lantern slides, and the one of two men playing chess was reportedly taken in Germany, not New York. Here are the comments, correcting some of the attributions of the images:

Some of these are not original autochromes but colorised black and white photos, e.g. the couple in Saratoga Springs, which is a detail from a colorisation by Sanna Dullaway: http://sannadullaway.com/0r…

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A number of critical errors. Image #1 (from the top down) is not an autochrome. Images #2 & 3 are autochromes by Charles Zoller (Rochester, NY). Image #4 is not an autochrome. Image #5 ( Foolish House) is an autochrome by Zoller. Images 6, 7, 8, & 9 are not autochromes. Image #10 (rooftops) is an autochrome in the collection of Wm. B. Becker and should be credited to him. Images 11, 12, 13, & 14 are by Zoller. All the Zoller autochromes are owned by the George Eastman Museum and should be credited to them. Image # 15 (chess players) is probably by Alfred Stieglitz or possibly by Edward Steichen and was taken in Germany. The last image (war bond rally) is an autochrome by J. D. Willis from the collection of Mark Jacobs.
Nearly all the non-autochrome images identified in this post are actually black & white lantern slides that have been digitally colored

 

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    Right! 6-7-8-9 are not color photographs at all, but Photochrom prints made from black and white negatives. You can see the originals online at the Library of Congress — the process is explained here: http://www.loc.gov/pictures…

    And if you’re interested in real Autochromes, including the rare New York rooftops image (#10 above), see the original postings online at the American Museum of Photography: http://photographymuseum.co…

 

 

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 From Afar:

See Old New York Through a Traveling Photographer’s Lens

Photographer Todd Webb’s poignant portrait of postwar NYC is now on exhibit at the Museum of the City of New York.

Like so many of us do today, Todd Webb learned about a new city through the viewfinder of his camera—although back in 1945, his camera was hardly pocket-sized. Freshly discharged from the U.S. Navy following World War II, Webb landed in New York and, shouldering his heavy photography equipment, began to explore both the city and a fledgling career as a professional photographer.

In September of 1946, the Museum of the City of New York featured Webb’s intimate and curious shots of New York at a solo exhibition, I See A City. Now, 71 years later, the museum’s new retrospective revisits Webb’s postwar years. A City Seen: Todd Webb’s Postwar New York 1945-1960 is a chronicle of the city’s growth and humanity told through glimpses of everyday moments. In a press release for the first exhibition in 1946, museum curator Beaumont Newhall wrote, “Above all Todd Webb’s portrait of the city is dignified. It is revealing, it is not always pleasant, but it is a portrait which all New Yorkers will respect and appreciate.” The same holds true for Webb’s work in the years that ensued

From Empire State Building, New York (Looking Southeast), 1946+

Webb fell in love with photography in 1940, after taking a master class with renowned nature photographer Ansel Adams. But while Adams was known for his stately pictures of the United States’ National Parks, Webb was more drawn to urban cityscapes and the people who brought them to life.

[Lexington Avenue, Near 110th Street, Harlem], 1946+
Fulton Fish Market Wharf, 1946+

Born in Detroit, Webb lived many lives before his time in New York. He was a successful stockbroker in Detroit until the stock market crash of 1929, then a less-successful prospector in California, a forest ranger, and, finally,  a Navy photographer in the South Pacific theater during World War II.

The Battery, New York (Peanut Peddler), 1945+

“He did an amazing job capturing the beauty and dignity of everyday life in a tumultuous period,” said Sean Corcoran, museum curator of prints and photography at the Museum of the City of New York. “At the same time, there is something timeless about his use of photography as a means of familiarizing himself with new surroundings, as a way to explore different neighborhoods and see what makes the city tick.”

125th Street, Harlem, New York, 1946+

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from MCNY.com, “Welcome To Fear City” screening of short films from the 1970s-80s in NYC

…”Savor this 16mm snapshot of the period, featuring four rarely-screened short films from the period. The films will be introduced by Will Hermes, senior critic for Rolling Stone, frequent contributor to NPR’s “All Things Considered,” and author of Love Goes to Buildings on Fire: Five Years in New York That Changed Music Forever, who is currently writing a biography of Lou Reed.

Sodom and Gomorrah, New York, 10036
Rudy Burckhardt, 1976, 6.25 min 
At the age of 62, in the year of Travis Bickle, one of New York’s great photographic chroniclers, turned his slyly responsive camera-eye on the city’s booming sex industry at 8th avenue and 42nd street. The result, like all Burckhardt’s work, is a lyrical impression of a time and place.

A Sense of Pride: Hamilton Heights
Monica J. Freeman, 1977, 15 min
Monica J. Freeman’s serene portrait of Hamilton Heights at the peak of its brownstone revival is a testament to the cohesion and spirit of an African-American middle class fighting hard for its place in a depressed city, and, in the process, returning a grand old neighborhood to its rightful splendor.

Punking Out
Maggi Carson, Juliusz Kossakowski & Ric Shore, 1978, 23 min
In 1977, three NYU film students ventured into the bowels of CBGB, returning with this snapshot of the venue in full flower. Intercutting brief glimpses of the Ramones, Dead Boys, and the Voidoids doing their worst, and disarmingly raw, unguarded interviews with band members and patrons alike, this may be the definitive punk document.

Electric Boogie
Tana Ross & Freke Vuijst, 1983, 34 min
Centered around a group of four black and Puerto Rican youths dubbed the Electric Boogie Boys, this short documentary from a pair of European filmmakers is a seminal portrait of the South Bronx break dancing scene.

Includes Museum admission and complimentary beer provided by Sixpoint Brewery.

Smile, It’s Your Close Up, our nonfiction film series co-programmed with Jessica Green and Edo Choi of the Maysles Documentary Center, zooms in on key moments, individuals, and communities to pose the question: “What makes New York New York?” Each program includes an introduction or conversation with filmmakers or other notable guests.

$15 for adults | $12 for seniors, students & educators (with ID) | $10 for Museum and Maysles Documentary Center members.

 

Attention, Members, to receive your discount, click on the “Buy Tickets” button above, then sign in to your account on the ticketing page.

Groups of 10 or more get discounts and priority seating, email or call us at programs@mcny.org or 917-492-3395.

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Book Launch party at Moscot Gallery & Music Space

FREE! Store Front II slideshow, dim sum generously provided by Nom Wah Tea Parlor, and wine at The MOSCOT Gallery & Music Space this Wednesday September 14, 2016
7:00 – 9:00 pm!

The MOSCOT Gallery & Music Space
108 Orchard Street New York, NY 10002
FREE
For more information, call (212) 477-3796

The evening will feature Store Front II photography, with a focus on the Lower East Side, and a Q&A session, followed by a book signing and reception.

MOSCOT is one of the many LES businesses featured in STORE FRONT II: A History Preserved. Nom Wah Tea Parlor is featured in our books STORE FRONT: The Disappearing Face of New York & NEW YORK NIGHTS.

James & Karla Murray Photography have produced a number of books containing photographic documentation of many shops and restaurants which became bygone within a few years after having their pictures taken.

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from Creative Boom: Photographs of everyday life in 1950s New York City discovered in an attic 45 years later

“The vintage photographs you’re about to see have an interesting history. They all came from a cardboard box filled with negatives that was unopened and virtually forgotten for over 45 years. When undiscovered photographer Frank Larson passed away in 1964, his wife Eleanora boxed up all of their possessions and moved out of their retirement home in Lakeville, Connecticut. The box of negatives was one of these items, and it has remained with the family ever since, tucked away in storage.

That was until, Carole Larson – the widow of Frank’s youngest son David – and her son Soren were sorting though old boxes in their attic and found the negatives.

Soren said: “I had seen a few examples of my grandfather’s photography over the years and always admired them – our old family photo albums have a few small prints of his work in them. My father also used to speak with admiration about his father’s love of photography and his weekend trips with his Rolleiflex into the city to film places like the Bowery, Chinatown and Times Square.

“But when I opened the box and began to explore what was inside I was truly shocked at the quality and range of the images, as well as the effort, dedication and love he brought to the task. When Frank died in 1964, I was only three years old, and too young to remember this gentle, careful man.”

Inside the box were over 100 envelopes filled with mostly medium-format, 2 1/4″ x 2 1/4″ negatives. The packets were marked by date and location, carefully sealed and left exactly as he packed them 50 years ago. Soren added: “As I began unsealing each packet and holding the negatives up to the light, it was like a trip back in time, back to the New York of the early ’50s.”

Following the discovering, Soren built a website in dedication to his grandfather, sharing the negatives-turned-photographs with the rest of the world. You can view more of Frank Larson’s amazing photography at www.franklarsonphotos.com. “…

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Artist Anthony Zito shared this snapshot of an old-style painted sign with the words “Russian Souvenirs” above a crammed-with-goods little shop “Remnants of A Different New York” on his Instagram account. With antiques, everything has a story….it’s got to be even more true for NYC buildings and storefronts which clearly have some age on them. It’s at 227 E. 14th St. Forgotten NY in “Mad About 14th” has some some more pictures and a conversation with the owner-operator. Unfortunately, when I last passed by, the shop was dark, and a “For Rent” sign was in the center of the front window.…

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from the NYPL: http://www.nypl.org/events/programs/2015/07/09/beneath-streets-hidden-relics-new-york-citys-subway-system-matt-litwack

Author @ the Library:
Beneath the Streets: The Hidden Relics of New York City’s Subway System, with Matt Litwack, American Photographer and Graffiti Artist
Thursday, July 9, 2015, 6:30 p.m. at Mid-Manhattan Library (fully accessible to wheelchairs)
Only a handful of transit workers, daring explorers and graffiti writers have experienced the full scope of the New York subway system. Beneath the Streets reveals this world for the first time with fantastic photographs captured from throughout the tunnels and byways of the subway. Although it provides service to over 5 million riders every day, the subway is for most a sealed system. Very few of its patrons are aware of the extent of this vast underground infrastructure. The authors of Beneath the Streets first discovered this hidden world in the process of photographing graffiti found below ground in the subway system. Now their riveting documentary work opens up this subterranean maze, including 600 miles of active track as well as abandoned sections and disused stations, for all to experience.…

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