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pizza parlors

from Spoiled NYC: #Blessed: After 50 Years of Service, Di Fara Pizza Now Delivers

Di Fara Pizza has been serving up their unbeatable pizza for half a century.

When you visit Di Fara, you know two things– you won’t leave hungry but yeah, you better get ready for the wait, which can sometimes be up to 90 minutes during peak hours.

However, the pizza gods must be smiling down on us, because Di Fara just added delivery from 12 p.m. to 5 p.m. through UberEats.

The delivery extends to anyone living between Ditmas Park to Bay Ridge right now and they’re still working out the kinks.

As reported by Eater, Di Fara’s WiFi is a little whack, but now, Uber lets patrons know when their order doesn’t go through.

Also, a writer for The Daily Meal tried out the delivery service last Friday and received her pizza in less than an hour (!) but the slices were in individual boxes.

A representative also explained that for now, they’re using bicycle messengers, but plan to have Uber cars delivering whole pies.

Going to Di Fara to wait for your pizza, and watching Dom Dimarco snip basil like it’s the lord’s work, is a right of passage itself but seriously, a whole Di Fara pizza in less than an hour without leaving our couches?…

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from DNAinfo:

Mimi’s Pizza Priced Out of the Upper East Side After 51 Years, Owners Say

By Shaye Weaver | June 30, 2016 10:45am

 Mimi's Pizza, which was a favorite of people like Sir Paul McCartney, Bruce Springsteen and others, closed on Sunday.

Mimi’s Pizza is closed due to too high costs, the Vanacore family says. View Full Caption

UPPER EAST SIDE — The Vanacore family watched as the final remnants of Mimi’s Pizza were taken away after a public auction on Tuesday.

The longtime pizzeria — which over the 51 years it’s been on the Upper East Side was frequented by big names like Paul McCartney, Bruce Springsteen and Bobby Flay — served its last slice on Sunday after the family and the landlord couldn’t agree on terms for a new lease, they said.

“It seems like the Upper East Side is no longer a place for a family business,” said Lisa Vanacore, who owns the shop with her husband, Stephen. “It’s very difficult.”

The couple and their 19-year-old daughter Christina Perrotta were gathered at the restaurant on the corner of East 84th Street and Lexington Avenue to hand off the remains of their kitchen equipment and furniture on Wednesday afternoon.

They compared losing the restaurant to mourning a family member. From 2000 to 2003, Stephen Vanacore lost his mother, brother and his father, Dominic, who went by Mimi and whom the eatery was named after.

“It is like losing them all over again,” said Perrotta, adding that she had worked at Mimi’s Pizza with her parents since she was 2 years old. “I feel bad for my step-dad. His heart and soul was in this business.”

“This was the last piece of us,” Lisa Vanacore added, tearing up.

The family said they could not negotiate an affordable rent with their landlord, and will have to be out of the space by Friday. They declined to say how much they were being asked to pay. The landlord did not respond to request for comment.

Lexington Avenue was all mom-and-pop shops when Stephen Vanacore was growing up and working at Mimi’s, he said. There was a candy store, a butcher shop, an independent drug store and a print shop, Yorkville Copy, around the corner that was priced out two months ago, Vanacore said.

“We had a cleaners here that had to close and the pet store closed. The demographics are changing,” Lisa Vanacore said. “All we see now is Starbucks, drugstores and banks. We’re priced out of the neighborhood and I think it’s hard for a pizzeria to make these kind of rents no matter what kind of history we have up here.”

The Vanacores live in New Jersey now but used to live right across the street so they could see the bread being delivered every morning, they said.

Upper East Side resident James Tang, 32, was a regular at the pizzeria, having gone there since the time he was a child.

“When I had chicken pox when I was 4, it was the only thing I wanted,” he told DNAinfo New York on Wednesday. “It’s really sad and actually a travesty.

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“44 Amazing NYC Places That Actually Still Exist” (Buzzfeed).

Most are bars and restaurants.

A lot of classic New York City spots might be disappearing, but you can still go to these distinctive shops, bars, and restaurants. For now, anyway.

1. Russ & Daughters, 179 East Houston St. (East Village)

Russ & Daughters, 179 East Houston St. (East Village)

Jeffrey Bary / Via Flickr: 70118259@N00

Russ & Daughters, a family-operated “appetizing store” focused on selling traditional Jewish fish and dairy products, has been a fixture of the Lower East Side since 1914. It’s one of the only existing stores in the entire country dedicated to appetizing.

2. Eddie’s Sweet Shop, 105-29 Metropolitan Ave. #1 (Forest Hills)

Eddie's Sweet Shop, 105-29 Metropolitan Ave. #1 (Forest Hills)

Joe Shlabotnik / Via Flickr: joeshlabotnik

Eddie’s Sweet Shop is an old school ice cream parlor and soda fountain that has served the neighborhood of Forest Hills, Queens, for over a century. It’s not too hard to find ice cream shops that aspire to capturing the vibe of an old-timey soda fountain, but this is the real deal.

3. Strand Book Store, 828 Broadway (East Village)

Strand Book Store, 828 Broadway (East Village)

Postdlf / Via commons.wikimedia.org

Strand may be the single most beloved and iconic used book store in the entire city, and has been a destination for bibliophiles around the world for nearly a century. The store contains a staggering amount of books and truly lives up to its hype.

4. Di Fara Pizza, 1424 Avenue J (Midwood)

Di Fara Pizza, 1424 Avenue J (Midwood)

apasciuto / Via Flickr: apasciuto

Di Fara has been around since the mid-’60s but made the shift from local treasure to a destination spot for world class pizza sometime in the past decade or so. The pizza is so good that people are willing to travel from all over the city and wait for up to three hours to get a pie handcrafted by restaurant founder and pizza auteur Dom DeMarco.

5. Generation Records, 210 Thompson St. (Greenwich Village)

Generation Records, 210 Thompson St. (Greenwich Village)

Daniel Lobo / Via Flickr: daquellamanera

Greenwich Village was once a major destination for record collectors, but this large punk and metal-centric shop is one of the few stores that’s managed to stay open over the years.

6. St. Mark’s Comics, 11 St. Mark’s Place (East Village)

St. Mark's Comics, 11 St. Mark's Place (East Village)

St. Mark’s Place has been heavily gentrified over the past 20 years, but this stalwart comics shop has stuck around despite so many seedy punk and counterculture shops getting replaced with chains like Chipotle and Supercuts. (And yes, this is the comic book store from that one episode of Sex and the City.)

7. Caffe Reggio, 119 Macdougal St. (Greenwich Village)

Caffe Reggio, 119 Macdougal St. (Greenwich Village)

Scott Beale / Via Flickr: laughingsquid

Caffe Reggio has a crucial role in the development of coffee culture in the United States — it was the first establishment to sell cappuccino in America back in the 1920s. The cafe still has its original espresso machine, which dates back to 1902, and was purchased by founder Domenico Parisi when he opened the place in 1927.

8. Old Town Bar on 45 East 18th St.

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