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public lectures

Officially releasing on July 15th, the book Secret Brooklyn: An Unusual Guide is written and photographed by Untapped Cities founder Michelle Young and co-founder Augustin Pasquet. To celebrate, we’ll be hosting a launch party for the book on Thursday, July 13th at the Brooklyn Superhero Supply Co., one of the 100+ amazing places in this book.

The party is produced in partnership with the website Brokelyn and will feature a presentation by Michelle and Augustin about their favorite spots and the process of making this book. Refreshments will be served and there will be opportunity to purchase books, get them autographed and meet the authors.

Entry is free, but RSVP is required:

Book Now

Can’t make the event? Purchase the book on Amazon here: http://amzn.to/2tVS4r9

Here’s a little preview of what’s inside:

Discover secret museums, go on an urban safari for wild parrots, locate a landmarked tree, enter the oldest building in New York City, watch a performance of robots in a church, stand tall next to hobbit doors on an otherwise normal residential street, learn how to breathe fire, swallow swords, hammer a nail into your skull and charm a snake, touch the oldest subway tunnel in the world and the world’s smallest Torah, forage for food in Prospect Park, taste wine atop the world’s first commercial rooftop vineyard, step inside a grocery store frozen in 1939, take in a basketball game inside a historic movie theater.

Brooklyn offers countless opportunities to step off the beaten path and is home to any number of well-hidden treasures that are revealed only to residents and travelers who are ready to explore. Secret Brooklyn An Unusual Guide is an indispensable guide for those who think they already know Brooklyn or would like to discover its hidden places, taking you far from the crowds and the usual clichés.

 Brooklyn Superhero Supply Co., Secret Brooklyn: An Unusual Guid

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Movie Series Dealing With Life in Brooklyn at the Metrograph

Making Rent in Bed-Stuy

June 9 to June 12

On the occasion of the release of Brandon Harris’s first book, Making Rent in Bed-Stuy: A Memoir of Trying to Make it in New York City, called “a rebuke, in a form newly discovered, to the people James Baldwin once called ‘our morally dishonest and desperately dishonest countrymen,” by N+1 founder Keith Gessen, Metrograph is pleased to present six films that speak to the neighborhood and surrounding area’s rich cultural and political legacy as a black space, the lives of some of its most famous scions and as a bulwark, increasingly imperiled, for Brooklyn’s black population.

Brandon Harris to introduce Crooklyn on June 9. Following the screening, Harris will be signing copies of his book, Making Rent in Bed-Stuy.

A Q&A with Sebastián Silva and Brandon Harris to follow the screening of Nasty Baby.

Program notes by Brandon Harris

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from The West Side Rag:

ENJOY A WEEKEND OF INTERDISCIPLINARY PROGRAMMING WITH THE BARD GRADUATE CENTER FOCUS FESTIVAL

SPONSORED

Focus Festival

Bard Graduate Center’s inaugural Focus Festival, April 8-9, 2017, brings thinkers and artists together for a weekend of interdisciplinary programming that draws inspiration from the key themes of our two spring Focus Project exhibitions: Design by the Book: Chinese Ritual Objects and the Sanli tu and  New York Crystal Palace 1853.

Claudia Rankine, 2016 MacArthur Fellow, poet, and essayist, will join Garnette Cadogan, essayist, in the keynote conversation “Ways of Seeing the City” on April 8 at 7 pm. Additional programs include a talk by Michael Puett, author of the New York Times bestseller The Path (April 9, 5 pm); walking tours of the Seneca Village site in Central Park with archaeologist Cynthia Copeland (April 8, 3 pm) and “Branding Fifth Avenue & the Other NY” with Jack Tchen, co-founder of the Museum of Chinese in America (April 9, 12 pm); and performances of Aaron Landsman’s critically acclaimed Love Story, a theatrical piece about a disappearing city, two people navigating it, and a fidgety, obsessive follower (April 8, 5:30 pm and April 9, 3:30 pm). Curators will offer spotlight tours of the exhibitions (April 8 and 9, 12 pm). Family-friendly workshops will be a special treat for kids (April 8 and 9, 1 pm).

For information, tickets, and the full schedule of events, click here.

Wendy’s Subway Reading Room
In conjunction Focus Project exhibitions, Brooklyn-based literary organization Wendy’s Subway has curated a Reading Room in the ground floor of the Gallery at 18 West 86 Street.

Wendy’s Subway Reading Room at Bard Graduate Center promotes engagement with artists’ books, periodicals, and other publications selected for their relationship to the spring exhibitions and public programming. A series of readings and writing workshops that gather together some of the boldest voices from poetry, literature, and performance will accompany the installation. Over the course of the installation, visitors are invited to drop off books they would like included in the Reading Room. Admission to the reading room is free, as is the wifi. It will be open during all public hours. Book suggestions may also be offered via a feedback box in the Gallery.

Wendy’s Subway launches the first of its monthly Reading Series on April 26 with an evening reading of works by Layli Longsoldier, Julian Talamantez Brolaski, and Wendy Xu. Read more.

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Wednesday, September 28, 6:30 p.m.
Illustrated Lecture: Edith Wharton and the Food and Dining of Old New York
Descended from the city’s oldest Dutch and English families, Edith Wharton had intimate knowledge of the fading social customs of the early 19th century, Old New York, which she skillfully captured in numerous novels, stories, and her unforgettable characters. Her narrative details, of fashion, décor, etiquette – and food – are telling of the period and, more importantly, the social world of her characters. Using examples from Wharton’s fiction and non-fiction, combined with details of culinary history, food historian and professionally trained chef Carl Raymond will present a unique portrait of food and dining in 1840s to 1860s New York told through the lens of one of America’s greatest writers. Reception follows the lecture.
$25, Members $15. Click here for tickets.

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From The New York Adventure Club e-newsletter:

Crime In NYC: A History Of Vice And Murder (Sat)
Corrupt politicians. Crooked cops. Gangsters so terrifying that they’re known only as “Murder, Incorporated.” These are the men and women that have made New York City’s underworld the stuff of legend. But there is so much more to this legend than you’ve ever heard.
$15-25. Corner of Centre & Chambers Sts . Ticketed event through the New York Adventure Club.…

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Corrupt politicians. Crooked cops. Gangsters so terrifying that they’re known only as “Murder, Incorporated.”

These are the men and women that have made New York City’s underworld the stuff of legend. But there is so much more to this legend than you’ve ever heard. Why is it that New York had such a violent past? What drove these people to a life of crime? This is the story of a broken and corrupt system and the clever individuals smart enough to exploit it.

On this walking tour, we’ll explore Lower Manhattan where we’ll discuss the evolution of orphan street gangs into the mafia, con men and bank robbers so rich they rubbed elbows with the Vanderbilts, gun fights that would make the Wild West blush and the politicians that encouraged it. We’ll visit the old Five Points District, Chinatown, the Bowery and of course the Lower East Side. Let us show you how New York’s crime history began.

ticketed event: Sat Aug. 13th 11am-1pm ticket prices: $15.00-$25.00

Corner of Centre & Chambers Sts

Centre Street and Chambers Street
New York, NY

Electronic ticketing though Big Maven

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Greenwich Village Neon Evening Walking Tour

Where: Location TBA
When: 7:30 p.m.

Thomas Rinaldi, author of the book “New York Neon,” will lead a walking tour, organized by Untapped Cities, of the Village’s multitude of neon signage, on businesses like Bigelow Drugs, which dates back to 1838. Tickets are $30 plus fees on Untapped Cities.…

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Talk at the Tenement Museum

Wednesday, May 25 6:30 PM

New York Times food critic and cookbook author Melissa Clark helps us untangle a century-old gastronomic mystery. In 1901, an enterprising Lower East Side restaurant keeper named Hinde Amchanitzky published America’s first Yiddish language cookbook. Mysteriously, eight years after Hinde’s death, a “new and augmented edition” of her cookbook, a departure from the original in both tone and content, appeared in neighborhood bookstores. From schmaltz-laden noodle puddings and stuffed breast of veal to “hygienic” bread and celery cutlets, the two cookbooks could hardly be written by the same woman. Or were they?  Jane Ziegelman, author of 97 Orchard and the Tenement Museum’s Annie Polland present the culinary clues–translations of the recipes, newspaper ads, and food samples from the cookbooks as we try to solve the mystery, and at the very least, learn more about immigrant women and cooking.

 

This event is free and seating is first-come, first-served. Doors will open at 6 p.m.

 

If you have questions, contact Laura Lee at llee@tenement.org or 646.518.3032.

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